Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating onions, garlic, shallots and leeks.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old May 30, 2016   #16
velikipop
Tomatovillian™
 
velikipop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Langley, BC
Posts: 679
Default

It depends on what you are looking for in garlic; taste, size, or longevity. Here in the PNW Russian Red grows best. My favorites are rocamboles because they have great taste, not really hot, but wonderful for roasting. German Hardy, Polish and Korean Red always produce really wonderful heads and keep well into January. If you can get Kettle River Giant it will last well into the spring and , of course, you have to grow Yugoslavian and Spanish Roja.

Check out some of the resources on the web to see what is available and what does well in your zone.

Alex
__________________
I'll plant and I'll harvest what the earth brings forth
The hammer's on the table, the pitchfork's on the shelf

Bob Dylan
velikipop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30, 2016   #17
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,152
Default

It looks like Germany Hardy, German Extra Hardy, and German White are the same.
http://www.rickertville.com/garlic-varieties.html
Note to Worth: this one mentions Florida and South Texas as hard places to grow certain vars.
Kettle River Giant is one of the artichoke types and can be grown further south according to:
https://www.mmmgarlic.com/types-of-g...-giant-garlic/
They look big!! Grow these and make us all jealous.
Our New York White btw is also a softneck and quite a decent garlic to grow, but not as big as the Kettle Creek!

Spanish Roja is the only rocambole I've tried yet... delicious and really nice. It did well at the farm, so I hope it's just a little later here.

There's another rocambole, recommended for northern situations called Italian Purple or Purple Italian - there's also a softneck by that name so wondering if PMCGrady has the rocambole or the softneck? Let us know how they do pmc.

My thought, as with tomatoes, is to try out as many as feasible, and find which ones can tolerate my situation. Thick with white frost this morning.... shockin.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30, 2016   #18
dustyrivergarden
Tomatovillian™
 
dustyrivergarden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Holbrook, Az zone 5
Posts: 157
Default

I grow Inchelium Red garlic its an artichoke variety and my favorite of the varieties that I have grown... I do grow a hard neck German Extra Hardy I grew about 15 varieties and picked the one that did the best and it happened to be the earliest as well so now my main crop is inchelium Red and I grow a few hard neck because people at the farmers market want to try a hard neck...
__________________
“The yield of a crop is LIMITED by the deficiency of any one element even though all of the other necessary elements are present in adequate amounts”. J. Von Liebig's law of the minimum.
dustyrivergarden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 30, 2016   #19
Father'sDaughter
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MA/NH Border
Posts: 4,190
Default

This article talks about a few others that do well in TX - http://www.texasgardener.com/pastiss...07/Garlic.html
Father'sDaughter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31, 2016   #20
Reign
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NY
Posts: 130
Default

I'm learning. Right now I have all hardnecks in the ground. Chesnok Red, German Red, Polish Jen, and Music. Chesnok Red will always stay. I love cooking with it. Amazing garlic soup. Of the other 3, I'm not sure which will stay. But, I have a list of more to try next planting. Interesting Creoles.
Reign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 31, 2016   #21
Jeannine Anne
Tomatovillian™
 
Jeannine Anne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,453
Default

A few years ago I ordered a great many varieties from Boundary , I grew them to find a favourite and we had a tasting at my community garden. They were all hardnecks, I seem to remember that the clear winner here was Red Russian and we had two distinct different types. The newly purchased one and my own one that started off as commercial Red Russian that has adapted over many years to my area. After all the different ones I decided I liked my own Red Russian the best and that is all I grow now.
Jeannine Anne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #22
salix
Tomatovillian™
 
salix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: north central B.C.
Posts: 2,127
Default

Starting off with a disclaimer - never met a garlic that I did NOT like. That said, I prefer the large bulbs/large cloves because of the ease of peeling (arthritic hands). Every year I still grow a few "new to me" varieties but always Fish Lake, Northern Quebec, Leningrad, Red Russian.

My grow-outs of rounds and bulbils are out of control - I had them too crowded (can't waste any now) in too small a space (all that was available) and then the darn crows/ravens pulled the labels out just for fun. I did have a map, of course, but now I cannot really distinguish the rows. Guess we will just go with what grows best and biggest and call it Prince George Special.

Am so glad when Henry pops in with advice as I get the new varieties from him. Nice to have a local mentor who is familiar with our climate and growing conditions.
__________________
"He who has a library and a garden wants for nothing." -Cicero
salix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #23
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,152
Default

I can jump onboard of that disclaimer too.
Funny about the ravens, I had some panic this spring when I found my garlic mulch (grass clippings this time) was being torn up by some animal, which turned out to be my black beauties. I thought they may have been digging for the bit of bone meal but it turned out there were lots of worms and carpenters under the mulch so they weren't meaning to dig. They did actually dig some of the horseradish I planted, but thankfully there are a good dozen little shoots still coming up.
When we got new stock for the farm a couple years ago we also tried Leningrad and Northern Quebec. The Leningrad didn't do well either here or at the farm so they stopped growing it, and the four I grew out last year from my one bulb were not worth replanting.
Northern Quebec is amazing! Beautiful big plant and hefty cloves. Still being grown at the farm, but there weren't any left over last fall for me to poach.
These were seed garlics bought from Nova Scotia, so perhaps Henry's strain of Leningrad is a better one. The Kostyn's Red Russian bulbils I got in the swap must have been from his stock originally. It'll be my first Red Russian type, so excited.
I'm hoping Henry will pop in at some point and tell us about his own favourites and/or the exciting new ones he has on trial.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #24
drew51
Tomatovillian™
 
drew51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Sterling Heights, MI Zone 6a/5b
Posts: 1,286
Default

I have not been growing garlic that long. Someone here, sorry I already forgot? Gave me some hardnecks from Wisconsin. He was growing them for 20 years. They are huge, stored well for hardnecks. I also grow Killarney Red. A Rocambole. In another spot I have softnecks and grow Idaho Silver. I like all three of these and continue to grow them. Here is the Wisconsin Heirloom. On the right are two Killarney Red. Shorter, more leaves, and fan like structure.
I have three small beds. Wish I had more room in my suburban postage stamp of a lot!
drew51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #25
Zeedman
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 226
Default

Ditto on the garlic disclaimer... provided that they are winter hardy in my climate & produce large bulbs.

Bogatyr and Ron's Single Center are two of the strongest flavored. Carpati was in that category also, but my stock was destroyed by aster yellows in 2012, and I have yet to replace it.

Vic's, Special Idaho, Old Homestead, German Extra Hardy, Jurjevich, Persian Star, and Pskem are some of the most dependable. They produce large bulbs and/or large cloves. I tried Music once, and it did poorly, so I gave up on it... but it was in a poorly drained location that year (I was still learning proper garlic culture) so I may need to give it another try.

35 varieties in the ground at present, and after several bad years, this may be the last try for some of them if they don't size up. Everything is a little behind this year due to weather (no scapes yet) but they all look healthy, so this should be a good year.

In the best years, artichoke varieties will out-perform the hardnecks; but their winter hardiness is "iffy" here, and they are much more sensitive to excess soil moisture. Last year was a very wet Spring, and some of the artichokes produced only rounds, or very small bulbs - with numerous stem cloves. I planted a lot of those cloves, in the hope that bulbs grown from them may leave behind any soil-borne diseases, and lead to larger bulbs.

Interesting about German Extra Hardy & German White being possibly the same; I grow both, so I'll be observing them closely for any differences.

Chances are, Drew, that the vigorous garlic from Wisconsin is Martin's Heirloom... he posts on this board, so you may get an answer from him.
Zeedman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #26
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,047
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
I wish I could grow real garlic here.
The creole is what I heard does the best of the hard necks.
I also read on line you couldn't grow good garlic from store bought cloves.
Hog wash I just did this year.
The trick is knowing when to pull it what size cloves to plant and when to plant it.
One 5 X1 2 bed is going to be devoted to garlic next year maybe two 5X12 beds.
Worth
Have you tried buying some stock from Yong Farms? They're in AZ and so the garlic is adapted to warm,southern environment. Although,they are at a slight altitude so cooler than you would expect.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #27
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,311
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
Have you tried buying some stock from Yong Farms? They're in AZ and so the garlic is adapted to warm,southern environment. Although,they are at a slight altitude so cooler than you would expect.
Now I haven't.
I have been all over Arizona many times.
And seen the goof balls from New Orleans I worked with not bring a coat to Flag Staff.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #28
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,152
Default

That Killarney Red is beautiful. I've read that it's a great variety for cool and wet situations. Guess that's us.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 1, 2016   #29
drew51
Tomatovillian™
 
drew51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Sterling Heights, MI Zone 6a/5b
Posts: 1,286
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bower View Post
That Killarney Red is beautiful. I've read that it's a great variety for cool and wet situations. Guess that's us.
Yes, and the Idaho Silver softneck does well here too. It's a big bulb for softneck, Has excellent shelf life too. I consume the hardneck first, since the soft lasts longer, here is a braid from last year's harvest of Idaho Silver.

Here is the Wisconsin heirloom cloves.


Thanks all for listing your favorites. I will definitely have to try some! The ones I have work well, all the same fun trying new ones. I never grew a porcelain, so I have to do that! Just a note, the photo of the plants is from saved seed. Such as what is pictured above. I planted those bad boys!
drew51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 2, 2016   #30
bjbebs
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: illinois
Posts: 152
Default

Drew
I was the source of your " Wisc." garlic. I live in central Illinois and have been growing it for 30 years. It is an unknown variety to me. A good fist sized bulb that stores well for many months with that good strong garlic taste.

One chef I sell to takes all the scapes the crop produces. What he does with them is beyond me. I dropped off a good 30 plus lbs. yesterday, with more to come. After a long drive the car still reeks with a strong garlic odor.

The longer you plant that variety the better it gets. It's virtually foolproof.
bjbebs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:35 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★