Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating onions, garlic, shallots and leeks.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 27, 2016   #1
Ozark
Tomatovillian™
 
Ozark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ozark, Mo.
Posts: 162
Default Dug my first Garlic yesterday

Grilling some sliced Cocozella di Napoli zucchini with olive oil yesterday, I didn't have enough supermarket garlic so dug up two home-grown bulbs from the garden. Never having had fresh garlic before, my wife and I are very pleased with it. The bulbs are large, about 2 1/2" in diameter, and the bulb I peeled had 13 cloves around the hardneck stem. The flavor is very good and a little goes a long ways - we only used five cloves on a whole grill-full of zucchini.

Turns out, this garlic has red/purple stripes on the outside of the bulbs. We know this hardneck variety has been growing on an Ozarks farm here since the 1890's or before. From what I've read and from pictures I've seen, I think it might be German Red. What do you think?

Whatever variety it is, we're real glad to have it and I'll keep growing it.

Ozark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 28, 2016   #2
Noreaster
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Northeast
Posts: 260
Default

Can't answer your question, but here in NJ it seems time for me to start digging
most up. (including German Red, etc).

First one was yesterday, named Uzbekistan.

My first time with garlic, but from all that I've read you are supposed to "cure" the harvest for 2-3 weeks before eating.

Supposedly, that really intensifies the flavor.
Noreaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 28, 2016   #3
Father'sDaughter
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MA/NH Border
Posts: 3,711
Default

That garlic looks great!

And proper curing is crucial for longer term storage. The garlic can be enjoyed at anytime.

Not sure what the variety might be, but the fact that it had 13 cloves might help identify it. Many hardnecks tend to have half as many or fewer. I grow German White and it averages about six or seven cloves. I grew German Red a few years ago and I remember it being similar to German White in terms of size and clove count.
Father'sDaughter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2016   #4
jhp
Tomatovillian™
 
jhp's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Danbury, CT
Posts: 442
Default

I am growing German Red for the second year in a row. Last year's harvest is all eaten up and this year's hasn't been pulled out yet. But as I recall, it did not have many cloves, definitely not 13. One of the downsides as I see it because I have to save a bunch for replanting in the fall instead of eating them. If it had more cloves, that would be less bulbs I would have to save. I'll try to remember to check when I pull it in the next few weeks.

Whatever you have, it sure is pretty. Don't forget to save some for replanting in the fall. I love growing garlic. I think it may be the most carefree thing you can grow, and delicious.

Jen
jhp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2016   #5
Noreaster
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Northeast
Posts: 260
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Father'sDaughter View Post
That garlic looks great!

And proper curing is crucial for longer term storage. The garlic can be enjoyed at anytime.
....

So, may I ask.....by curing, there is basically no improvement short term with regard to flavor ?

I just picked more today...thought I should wait to eat until all are cured, but apparently not ? This could be good news for meals this week, after 9 months of
waiting !!!!!!!
Noreaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2016   #6
PhilaGardener
Tomatovillian™
 
PhilaGardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 1,215
Default

Great looking garlic, Ozark! Glad you are helping keep that heirloom going!
PhilaGardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2016   #7
Father'sDaughter
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MA/NH Border
Posts: 3,711
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noreaster View Post
So, may I ask.....by curing, there is basically no improvement short term with regard to flavor ?

I just picked more today...thought I should wait to eat until all are cured, but apparently not ? This could be good news for meals this week, after 9 months of
waiting !!!!!!!


It's kind of impossible to do a side by side with fresh dug vs cured, but I have certainly enjoyed lots of freshly dug garlic over the years.
Father'sDaughter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2016   #8
pondgardener
Tomatovillian™
 
pondgardener's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 273
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noreaster View Post
So, may I ask.....by curing, there is basically no improvement short term with regard to flavor ?

I just picked more today...thought I should wait to eat until all are cured, but apparently not ? This could be good news for meals this week, after 9 months of
waiting !!!!!!!
According toThe Complete Book of Garlic, "the curing process actually begins in the ground, as growth slows and leaves wither. Harvest marks the second phase of the curing process. The object at this point is not only to dry the garlic but also foster a curing process that limits the risk of mold and other infections, conditions the bulb for lengthy storage and deepens the flavors that we enjoy. The process should be gradual but not so prolonged that the risk of disease is increased."

But I don't see a problem with eating some that is just picked while you are waiting for the rest to cure properly. Especially compared to what passes for garlic in the grocery store.

George
__________________
“Learn from the mistakes of others-you can never live long enough to make them all yourself.”
pondgardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29, 2016   #9
Ozark
Tomatovillian™
 
Ozark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ozark, Mo.
Posts: 162
Default

Noreaster, I'm new at this too but I think curing garlic is done to preserve it so it can be used later, not for flavor enhancement. Believe me, there was nothing wrong with the freshly-dug garlic we used the other day - it was excellent!

I'll cure the bulbs I'm setting aside for cloves to re-plant in October, but other than those I don't intend to dry and cure any of the garlic we're going to eat. Instead, I'm going to follow exactly what TomNJ posted here in another thread a week ago:

"I peel and chop the garlic and put it into one-quart freezer bags, press it flat to about 1/4" thick, zip and freeze. To use you just break off the amount you need (breaks easily) and re-zip the bag. The texture is softened and the flavor slightly less sharp, but just use more. The softer texture makes it ideal for mixing in sour cream to make a great chip dip!"

This method sounds real, real good to me. We've got electricity here in Missouri, and freezers too!
Ozark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 30, 2016   #10
Noreaster
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Northeast
Posts: 260
Default

Okay, thanks all !

When first trying new stuff in garden, I have a tendency to take literally info
provided by "experts" and suppliers.

Think I might give some freshly picked garlic a whirl while majority are drying
out !!!!!!!!!!
Noreaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 30, 2016   #11
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 719
Default

Dug a couple hundred cloves last weekend, Music , Purple Italian, and Bogatyr did very well, small crops of Califonia Late, California Early was a total flop.
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 30, 2016   #12
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 27,896
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
Dug a couple hundred cloves last weekend, Music , Purple Italian, and Bogatyr did very well, small crops of Califonia Late, California Early was a total flop.
Good to hear.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 30, 2016   #13
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 719
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Good to hear.

Worth
Do you want some Worth?
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 30, 2016   #14
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 27,896
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
Do you want some Worth?
Soon as you can get around to it.
If I have to pack the soil in ice everyday this winter I will do so.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 19, 2016   #15
Ozark
Tomatovillian™
 
Ozark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ozark, Mo.
Posts: 162
Default

After leaving the bulbs in a cool room to dry for a couple of weeks, I processed my garlic harvest today. Thanks to TomNJ for posting his method because that's exactly what I did and I'm real pleased with the way it turned out.

I put aside 40 of the largest cloves, unpeeled, to plant in October - those are the red ones in the bowl on the left. Then my wife and I peeled the cloves to be frozen, those in the bowl on the right.

The little electric chopper shown worked great for 'mincing' the peeled garlic cloves, that took less than a minute. The result, minced garlic in bulk, is seen in the bowl in the second picture. Then I put the minced garlic in quart zip-lock freezer bags, pressed it out about 1/4" thick, and laid the bags flat in the freezer. As TomNJ says, it will be easy to unzip a bag to break off the amount of garlic needed, then re-zip the bag. What a great method!





Ozark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:33 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★