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A garden is only as good as the ground that it's planted in. Discussion forum for the many ways to improve the soil where we plant our gardens.

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Old August 30, 2016   #46
My Foot Smells
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JIM, will be calling be back, he is currently out on delivery.
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Old August 30, 2016   #47
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Let me chime in here with some general thoughts, then some more specific.
Really good analysis. Thanks.
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Old August 30, 2016   #48
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the results are in:

Attachment 65715


acidic soil, low N and K.

any help or suggestions would be appreciated. thanks
Your soil test bears out some info I posted on another thread about P. Most areas of the country have plenty of phosphorus in the soil. That means if your plants show signs of P deficiency that something else is going on. In your case, low N would prevent plants from taking up P, making it appear that your soil is deficient in P.

So for your needs you can follow their recommendations what to add at the bottom of the test page. Alternatively, you can use blood meal for N, and wood ash to get some K into the soil. Wood ash is quick release K, so it will amend that very quickly. It will also bring the pH up which you need. So it has the same effect as liming. It will also add some trace minerals. Hardwood ash is best. Here is some info on that. Be sure to read the advice at the bottom of the page:

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gar...f-used-caution

Here'a page to help explain your soil test:

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sor...ion_ec1478.pdf

It's not that complicated, and wood ash is FREE!

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Old August 30, 2016   #49
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thank you for the articles, i had previously read the 2nd article, but just now read the first one. i have a fire pit, but burn all kinds of things, so not pure; but depending could be a good option that i have not thought about. i did pick up some blood meal at the wally world deep discount sale, but they are small bags.

i do have two tumbler compost bins that i use from time to time.

i have never used "urea" as recommended on soil test for N, but did read about it.
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Old August 30, 2016   #50
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thank you for the articles, i had previously read the 2nd article, but just now read the first one. i have a fire pit, but burn all kinds of things, so not pure; but depending could be a good option that i have not thought about. i did pick up some blood meal at the wally world deep discount sale, but they are small bags.

i do have two tumbler compost bins that i use from time to time.

i have never used "urea" as recommended on soil test for N, but did read about it.
I have never used urea either and don't think I would. I prefer other sources of N. I do use wood ash periodically though and it works great. It has K, Cal, Mag and other nutrients and limes the soil. A lot of those other liming agents have to slowly break down, especially the pelleted forms. Throw some wood ash on your grass and water it in. It will make a lush, dense green patch. It's like concentrated compost. And there are different forms of N. Some are available and some arent'. For that reason I like to use several different organic N fertilizers. I also keep a stock tank by my garden full of water and let it grow green algae. I put buckets of that on the plants periodically for a boost of N. Blue green algae fixes nitrogen out of the air. More free fertilizer.

When I need a quick boost of nutrients I will use Ironite 7-6-6 liquid in water. It adds all the micros to the soil. Get some hardwood and burn it, save the ash and spread it all over the garden. Feed supply stores sell big bags of blood meal.
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Old August 30, 2016   #51
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I will keep that in mind. The wood ash does have to be disposed of somewhere? Currently I dig out and wheelbarrow over by some old elm trees - they do seem to like the ash pile.

I'm going to ask for a list of products down at the co-op, preferably with prices. I don't have a big garden, but prices are much better and most things I can use a 50# bag of on the property. I'm really not interested in dinking and dunking with the tiny retail plastic sacks with a cute picture.
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Old August 30, 2016   #52
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What you have wood ash?

This is far better than the lime you was going to buy.

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Old August 30, 2016   #53
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What you have wood ash?

This is far better than the lime you was going to buy.

Worth
Does it matter if there are a few beer boxes thrown in the mix, and maybe a cardboard box of two?

The "fires" consist of many things, to include disposed plants, trimmed limbs, etc...

Currently I have a small bushel of mowed grass on the pit, oak limbs, elm limbs, a dead bush, sticks and small pecan limbs; and i am working on a beer box this week that will be added.
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Old August 30, 2016   #54
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Oh heck, just run it through your soil screen. What? You don't have a screen? Four slats, piece of 1/2" wire cloth, staples. Guaranteed to sort out beer bottles, un-burnt banana peels, and most coins.
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Old August 30, 2016   #55
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Does it matter if there are a few beer boxes thrown in the mix, and maybe a cardboard box of two?

The "fires" consist of many things, to include disposed plants, trimmed limbs, etc...

Currently I have a small bushel of mowed grass on the pit, oak limbs, elm limbs, a dead bush, sticks and small pecan limbs; and i am working on a beer box this week that will be added.
No it don't matter. As long as there's no paints, chemicals or plastics in it, it's fine. The majority of the ash will be from all the wood. The little bit of ink on a beer box is nothing, it will burn away. And don't sift out the charred bits either. If your fires don't get enough oxygen and it just smolders like when you throw grass clippings on it, then it makes bio char which is really good for the soil.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organ...ArticleContent

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Old August 30, 2016   #56
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good point dm. there is a lot of hardware that ends up in the pit. no bottles though, hate "trashy" fires. i can burn anytime day or night in the county, and it often doubles as a romance enhancer.

summertime burnin' is just keeping the property clean for the most part.
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Old August 30, 2016   #57
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Oh heck, just run it through your soil screen. What? You don't have a screen? Four slats, piece of 1/2" wire cloth, staples. Guaranteed to sort out beer bottles, un-burnt banana peels, and most coins.
LMAO. I have one but mine is 1/4" hardware cloth. I use it to sift bales of peat moss to make my seed starter mix.
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Old August 30, 2016   #58
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good point dm. there is a lot of hardware that ends up in the pit. no bottles though, hate "trashy" fires. i can burn anytime day or night in the county, and it often doubles as a romance enhancer.

summertime burnin' is just keeping the property clean for the most part.
Same here. If you have nails and stuff in there from some burnt up wood products like old skids, just get one of those big magnets on a stick and run it through the ash.
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Old August 30, 2016   #59
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No it don't matter. As long as there's no paints, chemicals or plastics in it, it's fine. The majority of the ash will be from all the wood. The little bit of ink on a beer box is nothing, it will burn away. And don't sift out the charred bits either. If your fires don't get enough oxygen and it just smolders like when you throw grass clippings on it, then it makes bio char which is really good for the soil.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organ...ArticleContent
Interesting and easy to do. I might light 50 decent size fires a year. I've got 2 wheelbarrow loads full of ash right now in the pit. I burn all my plants from the garden, but surely the heat would kill any pathogen? Of course, that is usually at season's end and not year round.

Truthfully, never thought about placing in my beds; but not opposed.

Thanks for the information.
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Old August 30, 2016   #60
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Theres not much point in taking a soil test and then ignoring the labs recomendations, is there? The most important role ph plays in your soil is to allow uptake of nutrients needed to grow the crop you list on your soil test. Certain nutrients are more readilly available at different levels of acidity or alkalinity.
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