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Old October 21, 2016   #1
AlittleSalt
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Default Onions 2017

2016 has been a long learning gardening experience for me. We did have a lot of tomatoes and onions even though we found out the ground is crawling with root knot nematodes. There have been highs and lows along the way. Times when I wonder why I'm still trying to garden.

And then, there are good things that remind you that is all worth it.

The labels are a little difficult to see because of the lighting, but the trays are Granex Hybrid that I bought seeds for, and Texas 1015Y that I saved seeds for. Both have onion plants popping up today/last night. So far, the Texas 1015Y are popping up left-and-right. The store bought Granex only has a few popping up. They'll catch up eventually.

It feels good knowing that you are doing something right. So begins the 2017 gardening season for us.
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Old October 21, 2016   #2
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Sometimes I think gardeners and farmers both are eternal optimists, always wanting to hope for more, "weeelll, NEXT year..." , " I'm going to try..." and "New garden space will be..."

Maybe growing things is an expression of hope and life?

A dormant seed to me, is potential. A seed just starting to sprout reminds me of the drive to live, to produce, to thrive - to hope.


And, most years, we get something lovely to eat and share.
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Old October 21, 2016   #3
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Beautifully said Imp.
Nothing like s tray of newly sprouted babies is there Robert. Best wishes for your crops this year!
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Old October 21, 2016   #4
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I do agree! Incurable optimists.
And we do try different things, and there's always something interesting to enjoy and share.
I had so much fun with onions this year, and so proud of my ha ha little harvest... I immediately clicked on this thread to read and enthuse about Robert's new onions!!!! Robert, your onions were gorgeous this year. Sumptuous! I enjoyed them. as much as my own.
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Old October 21, 2016   #5
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Thank you I agree, we do try different things very optimistically. Later this fall, I'll be planting cereal rye all throughout the garden. Never in a hundred years would I have thought about planting cereal rye anywhere - much less in the gardens.

I've been researching growing carrots in large pots today. Did you know they can take temperatures down to 20F?
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Old October 23, 2016   #6
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20 F is low! If I thought i could get them through winter I'd be tempted to plant em now.

A guy I used to work for told me he kept carrots in the garden all winter, by covering with a really deep straw mulch. But of course they were already full grown.

Another guy I met who runs one of the dollar stores here, told me that he grows carrots in buckets all year round. Pretty sure he meant indoors though.

But it sure sounds copacetic for Texas. Short winter is a good thing.
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Old October 23, 2016   #7
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I planted my onions seeds in one of my raised beds yesterday. I planted red grano and 1015Y onions. If everything goes right, I will dig them up and transplant in early January. Robert, on another note, I cut some mustard greens today to make soup. I don't tolerate anything hot and the mustard greens were hot when raw. In the description from the place I bought the seeds it said the heat would disappear when cooked. I was skeptical, but the description was correct and the greens taste great. The variety I purchased was southern giant red mustard. The soup was made up of home smoked sausage, diced onion, diced garlic, cubed potatoes and lots of mustard greens. Turned out really good and I will be making it again.
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Old October 23, 2016   #8
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Arlie I first read that as you cut up some mustard greens to make soap.
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Old October 24, 2016   #9
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The Texas 1015Y are growing fast. It looks like near 100% germination - helmet heads and all. The Granex Hybrid is taking its sweet time germinating. The mix is Pennington's they are growing in. I got it pretty cheap back in summer. It came with free weed seeds already mixed in, but it still works well.

After thinking about it, I probably should add Weed = unwanted plant - not the slang word for MJ.

The last picture are the 1015Y. I think the odd yellow striping is due to the sun setting. Not sure?
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Old November 7, 2016   #10
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It has been 23 days since planting. The 1015Y are doing well. The Granex Hybrid has been planted twice and ...the picture tells it all. I am considering pulling the Granex up and planting the tray with 1015 Y seeds.
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Old November 7, 2016   #11
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While planting sprouting onions in an area that only gets direct sun in the winter after the leaves fall off the trees - I found this onion. Of course, I had to plant it. It is dark green. It used to be yellow. I took the picture in the rain.
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Old November 21, 2016   #12
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I did go ahead and toss the Granex Hybrids and used different potting mix to plant another tray of Texas 1015 Y on November the 13th. I first saw them breaking through the potting mix Saturday. This is Monday November 21, the tray looks like this.

Ideally, Texas 1015 Y is planted outdoors on October 15 - giving it its name. The other tray was planted on 10-16 and is looking really good (Pictured in post #10 a week or so ago.) I'll be seeing if planting a month late makes much difference when it is time to transplant out in mid-late January.
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Old November 26, 2016   #13
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They're catching up
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Old December 11, 2016   #14
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Default Winter Greenery

I am watering the garden today, and chose to take a couple pictures. The first is Elephant Garlic. The second picture is of second year onions. (12-11-16)
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Old December 11, 2016   #15
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It was forecasted to get down to 18F and stay below freezing for 15 hours last Friday morning, so I put the last of the onions that had not sprouted in a sack and then inside a taped up cardboard box. It didn't get that cold - only 25F for a couple of hours. They were in the box for 4 days because I was curious if they would sprout in the dark like potatoes do. The pictures says it all.

These onions are both hybrids and others are OPs. I want to plant them out in the woods behind our house and just let them grow however nature grows them.

If anyone is curious to why we didn't just eat them - they smell like a sweaty pair of teenager's tennis shoes.
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