Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 1, 2017   #16
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,343
Default

I grow in black dirt that I dig out of our cow field, mostly where the old hay bales have decomposed. I never did get it tested, but it works great all by itself. I don't add fertilizer. When I try to inject chem ferts through the drip irrigation, the plants get leaf curl and look burned, even with tiny amounts. It's black because of the humates, which are nutrient uptake accelerators. I really think that having a high humate content changes everything. Plants don't require nearly the nutrients that they are supposed to. They grow faster, and they also use water more efficiently, surviving water stress much better.

And as for my answer to the thread's title question, I learned that I need to spray preventatively for disease. By growing in the same place, I am just accumulating more disease spores each year.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 1, 2017   #17
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,593
Default

I grew up not to far from you, great farmland indeed. That is the goal Cole, I want to cover the dirt with IRT, for more warming, and greatly cut back on fert for cost savings. I f I get good results I can throw up some simple hoop houses for production with few hassles. In AK, for warm weather crops, GH's just work better than an open field.
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 1, 2017   #18
WLeClair
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Bakersfield, CA (zone 8b / 9)
Posts: 38
Default RKN

I, too, learned that RKN spells "no tomatoes". Trying to solarize that bed this July.
WLeClair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 1, 2017   #19
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,343
Default

Mark, whatever the soil test results are, I think you should still try a few plants in that black dirt of yours with no added fertilizer, as a control. I get the feeling that if I had sent mine in, the test would have told me I was deficient in something.

I agree that for hydro plants, science has it figured out and can tell you exactly what plants require. But soil biology throws in so many complex variables that it is nearly impossible to get one correct answer to the question of what a plant needs.

Here's a pic of fruit set on a dwarf plant from last summer. Once again, back to the thread title, this past season I learned that I don't need fertilizer.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Noferts.jpg (157.0 KB, 226 views)
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 1, 2017   #20
Wedlady77
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: North Florida
Posts: 7
Default

This past season/year (mainly due to this forum) that I knew nothing about tomatoes. I thought I knew enough to fill a bucket but in reality enough to fill a thimble. I discovered so many varieties that I never knew existed. I also figured out why my Roma tomatoes died a vicious death. Starting my seeds too late cause them to deal with a heat level they could not handle. Those Zone ratings really have meaning. So, going into this spring I have a lot more knowledge and I feel I will have a lot more success.
Wedlady77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 3, 2017   #21
maxjohnson
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: FL10B
Posts: 330
Default

-Commercial manure compost can have herbicide in it.

-My container mix was too heavy, add vermiculite or fine pine bark.

-Coconut coir tie up nutrients in the container. Never buying it again.

-Look is not equal to taste.

-Don't fall for hypes.

-Lower humidity is better for veggies growing.

-Garden Peach is productive. Delicious is big. Sungold plants smell nice.

Last edited by maxjohnson; January 5, 2017 at 11:25 AM.
maxjohnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 4, 2017   #22
User 636
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Virginia
Posts: 36
Default

Drip systems and timers are awesome. It solved a large part of my problem: Long work shifts and hot summers.

Dip systems can help with container cooling. Eventually my plants were on every 6 hours during June-August. I felt like they didn't get the saturation but that was compensated by the cooling.
User 636 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 6, 2017   #23
encore
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 357
Default

it's easier to just give neighbors tomatoes, in stead of plants! because you end up taking care of theirs anyways! lol----tom
encore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #24
HudsonValley
Tomatovillian™
 
HudsonValley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Hudson Valley, NY, Zone 6a
Posts: 404
Default

I learned:
- It's not THAT hard to grow plants from seeds with a heat mat and fluorescent lights
- Hot peppers don't germinate well in peat moss-based starting mix, but tomatoes will germinate in just about anything
- Organic granular fertilizers don't really work in sterile potting mix
- I don't understand vermiculite and should avoid using it
- Deer netting can be deadly to chipmunks
- Nothing repels groundhogs
- Beets attract groundhogs
- I cannot grow beets
- Tomatoes can grow to heights that far exceed the plant stakes available in my area, but grounding rods are viable alternatives
- Many seedlings can outgrow under-feeding, turning purple, over-feeding, under-watering, over-watering, light-scalding, and windburn
- I will be removing the previous owners' mint plants from my raised beds for the rest of my life
- Dragonflies are wonders of nature
HudsonValley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #25
Ricky Shaw
Tomatovillian™
 
Ricky Shaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Zone 6a Denver North Metro
Posts: 1,856
Default

I found large stubby tomato plants harder to grow in containers than large vining ones. Which would seem counter-intuitive, because they market the short squatty ones mostly for containers.
Ricky Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #26
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 7,343
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonValley View Post
- I don't understand vermiculite and should avoid using it
It's great for seed starting, especially as a layer on the top of the media, because it does not crust over like peat when it dries.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #27
Black Krim
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: New England
Posts: 171
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky Shaw View Post
I found large stubby tomato plants harder to grow in containers than large vining ones. Which would seem counter-intuitive, because they market the short squatty ones mostly for containers.
Can u list examples for us new gardeners and explain the problems u encountered plz.
Black Krim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #28
Ricky Shaw
Tomatovillian™
 
Ricky Shaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Zone 6a Denver North Metro
Posts: 1,856
Default

Based on nothing more than my experience last year, and definitely no reflection on the short comings of any plant. Knowing ultimately it's on the grower to get it right, and that many other gardeners may of had no problems.

Of 36 plants, 33 indeterminates, the 3 determinates (EMChampion/Marglobe/Champion II) were the only plants not to make it till season end. All plants were in 15 gal fabric pots, watered and fed exactly alike. All succumbed to a mold or bacteria of some kind. It was quick and fatal, but had the same thing on two GWR indeterminates and was able to cut out affected branches and the plants keep producing.

The irony was I'd planted the determinates as the sure thing back-up in case the idea of big indeterminates in bags was a flop.
Ricky Shaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #29
HudsonValley
Tomatovillian™
 
HudsonValley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Hudson Valley, NY, Zone 6a
Posts: 404
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
It's great for seed starting, especially as a layer on the top of the media, because it does not crust over like peat when it dries.
That is how I attempted to use it, but the seeds keep rotting. I must be doing something wrong...
HudsonValley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 8, 2017   #30
clkingtx
Tomatovillian™
 
clkingtx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wichita Falls Texas
Posts: 430
Default

Most of what I learned was related to my shortcomings, lol.

I learned that no matter how much I want a large garden, I cannot maintain it when it gets hot, without sacrificing my health. This year I am going to reduce my plant numbers, and be very deliberate about each choice.

I learned that the best thing I can do to ensure gardening success is to install an automatic watering and fertilizing system at the beginning of the season. Last year my system required daily filling, and so was more than I could handle when the real heat set in- this year I plan to have each plant I grow to be auto watered and sheltered.
__________________
Carrie
clkingtx is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:50 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★