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A garden is only as good as the ground that it's planted in. Discussion forum for the many ways to improve the soil where we plant our gardens.

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Old January 2, 2017   #1
WLeClair
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Default Till in marigolds for RKN?

I have read several places about the benefits of marigolds in fighting RKN (I have a bed that has a nasty infestation). What confuses me is what to do with the marigolds when it comes time. I have read conflicting info: 1 -- till the marigolds in with rest of cover crop (mustard blend in my case), 2 -- pull the plants and discard because the nematodes (at least some, I guess) are still alive in the marigolds. Any insight on this would be greatly appreciated.

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Old January 2, 2017   #2
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What I've read is to till them in. I grow Dwarf French Marigolds. I also read that some types of marigolds don't work.

I should mention, I'm in the same boat - the RKN is a microscopic beast.
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Old January 2, 2017   #3
WLeClair
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I agree...they are the bane of my gardening existence (that and gophers on my fruit trees). I'm also solarizing the bed this summer when the major heat comes in. I'm hoping that with the mustard, marigolds, and solarizing I can at least grow something in there next year -- even beans.
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Old January 2, 2017   #4
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Originally Posted by WLeClair View Post
I agree...they are the bane of my gardening existence (that and gophers on my fruit trees). I'm also solarizing the bed this summer when the major heat comes in. I'm hoping that with the mustard, marigolds, and solarizing I can at least grow something in there next year -- even beans.
There's always containers. Lately I just save the bags that fertilizers and potting mixes come in, and put the bag between the pot and the ground, and I have a barrier that is impenetrable to RKN.Solarizing doesn't work too well. Even if I solarize, that's only really good for about 4 months here before they are reinfested, and we should have a 9 month season.
Try using the plastic bags with your pots set on top, and new fresh potting mix in the pot. Cheap, easy, no more RKN threat.
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Old January 3, 2017   #5
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Thanks for the input, Ginger. Question for you, from what I have read (including in Craig's book) the containers should be emptied and filled with new potting soil every year...sounds like a pretty big expense (not to mention work) every year. I have built in the last three years 5 raised beds (with another coming next month) for almost 200 sf of growing space...and quite a bit of money into it. Only one of them (of course the biggest one) is infested...and interestingly, but not surprisingly, it's the one I filled with bulk soil from a local landscaping place. I am wondering, if my current efforts don't pay off if I should just shovel out the soil, "decontaminate", and then fill with bagged soil I know is safe. What do you think?
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Old January 3, 2017   #6
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When you said "just shovel out the soil" I started wondering how long can RKN and eggs survive without root to feed on ? Found this page with more than you ever wanted to know.
http://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/intro...tNematode.aspx
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Old January 3, 2017   #7
WLeClair
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Thanks, 4season. After reading the article (yeah, more than one ever wants to know) I think I may try planting earlier (since our frost is pretty much non-existent), pulling the plants when the major heat comes in (since production pretty much stops anyway), and keep it fallow after I solarize until the cooler temps in late October. I'm planning beans for this bed this summer...does anyone know if they are susceptible? A cursory search indicated they are. I've never planted a large crop of beans in this bed -- this year will be telling.
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Old January 3, 2017   #8
WLeClair
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Would a bleach spray (on the bed lumber, not the soil) kill any remaining eggs, do you think, if I do shovel it out?
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Old January 3, 2017   #9
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Originally Posted by WLeClair View Post
Thanks for the input, Ginger. Question for you, from what I have read (including in Craig's book) the containers should be emptied and filled with new potting soil every year...sounds like a pretty big expense (not to mention work) every year. I have built in the last three years 5 raised beds (with another coming next month) for almost 200 sf of growing space...and quite a bit of money into it. Only one of them (of course the biggest one) is infested...and interestingly, but not surprisingly, it's the one I filled with bulk soil from a local landscaping place. I am wondering, if my current efforts don't pay off if I should just shovel out the soil, "decontaminate", and then fill with bagged soil I know is safe. What do you think?
I don't know enough about raised beds to answer, but as to changing the pot soil every year, really, I don't know many besides Craig that actually do that. I solarizing my Earthboxes every summer, then right before the season starts, I remove the old used fertilizer strip, add more dolomite lime, new fertilizer, and top it off with fresh potting mix but it's about 6 years using the Earthboxes, I haven’t changed my soil once. Not in my 7 gallon pots either.
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Old January 3, 2017   #10
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Thank you Marsha. I didn't realize you could use the same soil/mix in containers from year-to-year. That changes how I was thinking about container growing. Now it's a realistic option for me.
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Old January 4, 2017   #11
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I agree...thank you so much for the information.
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Old January 4, 2017   #12
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Originally Posted by ginger2778 View Post
I don't know enough about raised beds to answer, but as to changing the pot soil every year, really, I don't know many besides Craig that actually do that. I solarizing my Earthboxes every summer, then right before the season starts, I remove the old used fertilizer strip, add more dolomite lime, new fertilizer, and top it off with fresh potting mix but it's about 6 years using the Earthboxes, I haven’t changed my soil once. Not in my 7 gallon pots either.
unless I have a growing specimen in pot, I usually empty out containers, let the dirt dry in a wheelbarrow and mix in a new bag or two. I cull through the inert potting mix (I only use mix now in containers) and throw some out. I made the mistake of using a soil mix (w/ a compost base) and there was a fungus among us. Black widows galore.

I like to wash out old pots and containers that are used for annuals prior to replanting and keep things "fluffy."
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Old January 4, 2017   #13
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http://www.tomatoville.com/search.php?searchid=2532456

In the above search for RKN's you'll find a lot of information about what others have used in the past, ranging from shrimp shells to Ebon rye to solarization, and yes Marigolds,and much more.

And reports back on how effective,or not.

Good to remember that RKN's prefer sandy soils since they migrate from one sand grain to the next, via the water shell around each grain,which allows them to spread easily in such sandy soils. Then taken up by the plant roots.

Possible solution and not my own but the experiences of many others? If you have sandy soils add lots of good mulch each year so as to seperate the sand grains making RKN movement more difficult.

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Old January 4, 2017   #14
WLeClair
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Carolyn, thank you. A quick question for you, as I am fairly new to Tomatoville...when I click on the search link you attached, I get an error that reads "Sorry - no matches. Please try some different terms." Is there a special way to open attached search query URLs on T'ville?

Thanks for the tidbits too...the soil in my raised beds is a combination of forest loam, composted manure (cow, I think), peat, and some Kellogg's raised bed mix. So, it's got a pretty good tilth -- not very sandy. The original soil that I put in the bed...that came bulk from a local landscaping supplier and it was quite sandy...and I think it was already infested with RKN. I removed about half of that original soil last spring and replaced it with the bagged recipe above, but still had pretty bad RKN this past growing season...it makes me think I need to shovel out the entire bed, because the other raised beds I have (using only bagged recipe) have had no signs of RKN.
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Old January 4, 2017   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WLeClair View Post
Carolyn, thank you. A quick question for you, as I am fairly new to Tomatoville...when I click on the search link you attached, I get an error that reads "Sorry - no matches. Please try some different terms." Is there a special way to open attached search query URLs on T'ville?

Thanks for the tidbits too...the soil in my raised beds is a combination of forest loam, composted manure (cow, I think), peat, and some Kellogg's raised bed mix. So, it's got a pretty good tilth -- not very sandy. The original soil that I put in the bed...that came bulk from a local landscaping supplier and it was quite sandy...and I think it was already infested with RKN. I removed about half of that original soil last spring and replaced it with the bagged recipe above, but still had pretty bad RKN this past growing season...it makes me think I need to shovel out the entire bed, because the other raised beds I have (using only bagged recipe) have had no signs of RKN.
I got a no match with my link as well,so will have to go back and fetch the info again when I have time.

Thanks for pointing that out.

Carolyn
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