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Old August 12, 2016   #31
My Foot Smells
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Originally Posted by kameronth View Post
I mix all my cherry size tomatoes together and put them in 1/2 pint boxes for $2 each. People like to see the mixed colors together. The customer picks what box they want and I dump them in a brown paper bag for them. Last week I sold out(about 24 1/2 pints) in 30 minutes.

My slicers are at $3 a lb and take about 3 hours to sell out. I have almost double the amount of tomatoes this week than last, so I may not sell out. Our market is small, only 15 or so vendors and I'm the only one that sells cherry tomatoes. A couple other people sell slicers at $3 a pound too.

The local news paper did a little piece about our market and took a photo of what was left of my cherry tomatoes last week.
Interesting. Are you growing these in a hot house? I am constantly amazed at the places people can successfully grow tomatoes. I know two (2) people who have lived in North Dakota (Fargo) and they told me the cold wind blew early and hard; and the winter lasted until May. Fairly hearty people, but said they needed 3/4 length parka w/ hood for short bursts outside. Nice selection, btw...

Guess what I'm trying to say above, I "figure" tomatoes would be a nice niche' crop in north Dakota w/o much competition. But having zero knowledge of ND tom production, sticking my neck out here; and possibly sounding dumb (which would not be the 1st time)...
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Old August 12, 2016   #32
kameronth
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Interesting. Are you growing these in a hot house? I am constantly amazed at the places people can successfully grow tomatoes. I know two (2) people who have lived in North Dakota (Fargo) and they told me the cold wind blew early and hard; and the winter lasted until May. Fairly hearty people, but said they needed 3/4 length parka w/ hood for short bursts outside. Nice selection, btw...

Guess what I'm trying to say above, I "figure" tomatoes would be a nice niche' crop in north Dakota w/o much competition. But having zero knowledge of ND tom production, sticking my neck out here; and possibly sounding dumb (which would not be the 1st time)...
I grow outdoors. I start my seeds indoors and transplant usually around end of May/1st week of June depending on weather. We've had frost up until mid June before but not normally. It's a short growing season but the long summer days make up for it and help production.

A lot of people grow tomatoes here but usually just for personal use- not for market.
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Old August 13, 2016   #33
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I would consider the donation box thing. There is a house about 2 miles down the road that has done it for a few years. My problem is that most of my fruit aren't perfect looking. Nearly all of them have rough looking shoulders or crack as they ripen. Not a huge deal to us but not very appealing to a customer.


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Old August 22, 2016   #34
Cole_Robbie
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Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has a "market after dark" event coming up:
https://bricksbar.wordpress.com/2016...-cedar-rapids/
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Old August 23, 2016   #35
Dewayne mater
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This definitely depends on where your market is. I live in a north Dallas suburb and our local market prices are much higher than that, and higher than the downtown Dallas large farmer's market. Also, those vendors selling heirlooms charge a premium and those are the first ones sold every time. Our best heirloom seller quit the market and now sells directly to high end restaurants that will take whatever he produces at high prices because they know their high end customers will pay a premium for local, unique produce.

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Old August 24, 2016   #36
My Foot Smells
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This definitely depends on where your market is. I live in a north Dallas suburb and our local market prices are much higher than that, and higher than the downtown Dallas large farmer's market. Also, those vendors selling heirlooms charge a premium and those are the first ones sold every time. Our best heirloom seller quit the market and now sells directly to high end restaurants that will take whatever he produces at high prices because they know their high end customers will pay a premium for local, unique produce.

Dewayne mater
You live in N. Dallas, N. N. Dallas, or N. N. N. Dallas? (I consider Plano - N. Dallas) I think N. Dallas has changed every 5 years. Deion Sanders has a helluva an estate on prime time real estate, every time I drive by prime time's local, I always spurt out, "who lives there" Just saw where they opened the Star (cowboy training fac.) in Frisco today.


I know a couple of ppl who cater to high end eateries. I think it is worth mention, that they take "grow orders" at the beginning of the season too. This might include okra (which has zero shelf life) and other species. The guy I know in jersey, caters to NY, NY and Bawston makes 80K a year (which isn't much in that area, he borrows $$ each year and pays off at end of year), but does afford him enough to live love of life. He also lives/supports a vietanmese family that helps work the fields (big operation - farm labor wages and avail is threatening many farms). Of course, he gets a free meal at several 5 star joints anytime he wants, but not getting $$rich$$ anytime soon.

Locally there is an upsurge of eateries (I can't spell the "r" word) who use only local and proudly display on their menu. It goes from meat to produce. However, these operations are well established and mid-massive. A tough market for a backyard gardener to stick their foot in. Too many middle men in the grocery bidness, and most produce doesn't travel well.........

The relationships are a beautiful thing too. Growing for your market makes cents, spec housing and produce is a dicey prop. Have it sold with destination before pluck. IMO

Last edited by My Foot Smells; August 24, 2016 at 10:21 AM.
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Old September 4, 2016   #37
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I live in Atlanta metro near Emory, and love to go to a small neighborhood organic farmers mkt on Sat am that has been there for years with the same vendors. Most offer CSAs. I see a lot of the same shoppers there every weekend. I know that at least a couple vendors sell to high end restaurants. Tomatoes sell from $4-6 lb depending on the week, type, and supply. They sell well. There are 4 produce and 2 of those sell eggs, one sells chicken. One sells beef pork and garlic, occas corn or squash. One sells mushrooms. The other vendors are coffee, bread and pastries, juice, fermented veggies, skin care, chocolate.

It is a simple, good start on my Sat am. Clientele that shop there live in the area and can afford the prices. Mostly people looking for fresh great tasting food and trying to eat healthy. I live maybe 4 miles away, but it is worth the trip. I always feel like I'm doing something good for myself.

Last edited by Bulldog; September 4, 2016 at 10:20 AM. Reason: Left out a letter
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Old September 9, 2016   #38
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Originally Posted by Dewayne mater View Post
This definitely depends on where your market is. I live in a north Dallas suburb and our local market prices are much higher than that, and higher than the downtown Dallas large farmer's market. Also, those vendors selling heirlooms charge a premium and those are the first ones sold every time. Our best heirloom seller quit the market and now sells directly to high end restaurants that will take whatever he produces at high prices because they know their high end customers will pay a premium for local, unique produce.

Dewayne mater
My son & his wife moved to N Dallas a few years ago. Anna to be specific & they haven't mention the higher prices you speak of. I know she fanatically shops local. Maybe the prices in the Washington Dc metro region are on par with Dallas and she is use to paying those prices.
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Old September 22, 2016   #39
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My farmers market was very quiet last weekend because of an afternoon Huskers college football game. There were plenty of vegetables left despite wonderful sunny weather.

Heirloom tomatoes $3/lb. Unimpressive selection was attracting a customer with a little girl that wanted to squeeze the merchandise.
Red globes plentiful also $3/lb.
Cherries - $4 colorful basket, people were looking when I went by
A yummy large variety Sam Marzano looking paste $1/lb. Was tempted to buy them myself

Lots of peppers pretty cheap
Beets $2-4 bunch of 3 large ones

Potatoes and melons didn't catch price

Garlic $5 bunch which is very cheap and looked like white grocery store type but was tied up so must be homegrown

Bouquets - two vendors had identical flowers that they were putting in vases, so methinks they were wholesaled - this was selling well

Expected to see mums but didn't notice any, Costco and Lowes may have sucked the market away

It would be hard to make a living with a small crowd this late in the season. Agree with early is best to market. It's an affluent area too.

- Lisa

The bouquets were $6 each, same prices for flowers in a ball jar

Last edited by greenthumbomaha; September 22, 2016 at 05:30 PM.
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Old September 24, 2016   #40
MarianneW
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I wish any of you sold at the farmers market near me. Lots of very colorful tomatoes, at least $4/lb, and I swear they're all gas-ripened. The black tomatoes we got today were bland bland bland. Ugh.
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