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Old July 13, 2017   #1
clkingtx
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Default Fruit tree disaster. What should I do?

I had a gardening accident(well it was an on purpose accident, lol). One or both of our pups de-potted and ate most of the roots of a honeycrisp apple and an oriental pear tree. I bought them on clearance from a local nursery at 80% off, and am keeping them in a kiddie pool in a grow bag now. They each are about 5 feet tall or so, and they each do have some good fine root hairs left, along with some good structural roots. I cut them down(they were each about 6 or 7 feet tall), to lighten the load of wood and leaves the roots have to support. The roots were still moist when I discovered them, and the leaves were only the slightest bit wilted(which is a miracle, considering it has been near 100 degrees each day this week).

My question is: the leaves have wilted and crisped up, and I am wondering if it would be better to cut them down more, and or go ahead and plant them in the ground now. The pool allows the grow bags to dry out quite a bit in between waterings(which can't be helped, I can only fill them once a day). Any advice? I don't have any accessible areas in my yard that get afternoon/evening shade, so the best I could do is try to shield them from the hottest sun by putting them behind the tallest tomato plants. Any advice? I know these trees(if they survive)won't do anything worthwhile this summer, I am just trying to find the best chance to keep them alive through the summer, till the heat lets up, and they grow back some more roots.

Thanks!
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Old July 14, 2017   #2
Nematode
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1) feed the dogs
2) get the dogs a proper chew toy
3) see if the nursery has some at 90% off.

Sorry I don't know how to save the tree.
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Old July 14, 2017   #3
clkingtx
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Lol, done, done and going tomorrow to see what they have for 90 percent off.

Thanks!
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Old July 14, 2017   #4
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You really dont want to plant trees in July.
You might as well keep a hose running on them.
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Old July 14, 2017   #5
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Carrie, when we bought a Liberty apple tree, many years ago, it was just a whip (single stem with no branches). We were told to plant it and then trim the top so that it was no higher than our belly buttons! We did that, and ended up with a lovely apple tree several years later. However, we lived in VT at the time, which is a lot cooler than TX.

I hate to throw anything away, so I would at least try planting them and hope that they survive.

As for the dogs, it sounds as if they need more entertainment

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Old July 14, 2017   #6
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You can trim them way back as long as you don't cut below the grafting line. Shade them with shade cloth. Are they dwarf, semi dwarf, or full size? they really shouldn't be expected to do anything but grow the lateral branches for the first few years.
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Old July 14, 2017   #7
clkingtx
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Ok, thanks. I was thinking that the ground would keep it moister than I would be able to in the pool, but you're probably right. I'll keep it watered and leave it where it is.
Thanks!
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Old July 14, 2017   #8
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I would also advise getting an anti transpirant for the leaves. it acts as a respiration barrier for expiring its moisture. we use it on out plants when transplanting to the garden and it works wonders. give it shade, too.
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