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Old January 5, 2008   #16
Rena
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Sounds delish! I have been wanting to do some kind of Bsprout augratin but have not gotten around to it.
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Old January 5, 2008   #17
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I can say that the small harvest of Brussels Sprouts I got out of my garden were so much sweeter and less "sulfury" than the ones at the grocery.
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Old January 5, 2008   #18
Rena
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Default Cabbage???

Ok so today I made some slaw with apples and pecans. I have large amount of cabbage. I looked up making kraut and and well it sounded kinda scary I need some cabbage ideas....................
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Old January 5, 2008   #19
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Rena making kraut isn’t that bad, you should try it.
We used to make several gallons of it a year.

But you had to ask and I am a cabbage loving person.

So here it is.

Bratwurst and cabbage with new potatoes.
Corned beef and cabbage.
My cole slaw, a dollop of mayo a dash of vinegar and ½ cup of sugar ½ head of cabbage and mix.
Quarter a head of cabbage and steam for 20-30 minutes and slather on some honey mustard.

Some vegetables I think should stand on their own without a lot of fancy spices.
Cabbage and squash are but a few so I mostly just eat it as is.

Don’t forget cabbage roles but it will take you forever to use up the cabbage that way.

Cabbage and potato soup one of my favorites.

Boiled cabbage with allspice and mace for seasoning, go easy on the mace.

Bubbles and squeak one of the UK’s favorite foods and mine too (potatoes and cabbage).

Here is one I came up with, cabbage lasagna, a layer of your favorite sauce a layer of half cooked cabbage a layer of cooked sweet Italian sausage and so on until the pan is full just don’t put any cheese in it.

Bake in oven until bubbly hot then serve with a good beer.

Lets see now oh yes.

Cabbage and carrots,

Cook cabbage and carrots cook carrots until half done then put in the cabbage until its done.
In this way the cabbage will not be over cooked.

Cook all of this with a little dark ale in the pot with the water.

Serve with a good smoked or fresh sausage.

I could be here all night, I love cabbage.

Worth
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Old January 5, 2008   #20
Rena
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Thanks!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Rena making kraut isn’t that bad, you should try it.
We used to make several gallons of it a year.

But you had to ask and I am a cabbage loving person.

So here it is.

Bratwurst and cabbage with new potatoes.
Corned beef and cabbage.
My cole slaw, a dollop of mayo a dash of vinegar and ½ cup of sugar ½ head of cabbage and mix.
Quarter a head of cabbage and steam for 20-30 minutes and slather on some honey mustard.

Some vegetables I think should stand on their own without a lot of fancy spices.
Cabbage and squash are but a few so I mostly just eat it as is.

Don’t forget cabbage roles but it will take you forever to use up the cabbage that way.

Cabbage and potato soup one of my favorites.

Boiled cabbage with allspice and mace for seasoning, go easy on the mace.

Bubbles and squeak one of the UK’s favorite foods and mine too (potatoes and cabbage).

Here is one I came up with, cabbage lasagna, a layer of your favorite sauce a layer of half cooked cabbage a layer of cooked sweet Italian sausage and so on until the pan is full just don’t put any cheese in it.

Bake in oven until bubbly hot then serve with a good beer.

Lets see now oh yes.

Cabbage and carrots,

Cook cabbage and carrots cook carrots until half done then put in the cabbage until its done.
In this way the cabbage will not be over cooked.

Cook all of this with a little dark ale in the pot with the water.

Serve with a good smoked or fresh sausage.

I could be here all night, I love cabbage.

Worth
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Old January 5, 2008   #21
shelleybean
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I, too, love cabbage. I just brought all mine in because we finally had a frost. I grow Savoy cabbages but you can do this with any cabbage, I think.

I put cabbage in vegetable soup all the time. Shred it up and toss it in with potatoes, zucchini, onions, peppers, carrots, tomatoes, etc. Add some leftover chicken or steak if you have it.

I love to cook a few slices of bacon and cook the cabbage in some of the drippings, so it's still a wee bit crunchy and then top it with the crumbled bacon.

I also like to cut it into very thin wedges and steam it. Then I just drizzle a tiny bit of clarified butter over the top. Salt and lots of pepper.

I've heard of a lot of cabbage casserole type dishes but I've never made any of them. You might want to Google some and give it a try. I like a lot of things from www.myrecipes.com and those recipes are all from Oxmoor House publications (Southern Living, Cooking Light, etc)

If you have a red cabbage, they are very good braised with Granny Smith apples and some red wine vinegar and some beer.

Let us know what you come up with! Gotta love that cabbage, gas and all!
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Old January 5, 2008   #22
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Oh, and I forgot, I think cabbage and beans and tomatoes are great together. Don't forget the Beano!
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Old January 5, 2008   #23
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My friend makes Saurkraut in the jars...Basically ,stuff the quarts with cabbage and salt, and leave the lids loose until fermentation is done and then tighten and process...I made it years ago, and think I left the jars on cookie sheets in the basement...They ooze out a bit, but the smell is nothing like crock made saurkraut...
I think I have seen the same method described on the internet if you are still interested...

Jeanne
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Old January 6, 2008   #24
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I love cabbage too! I'm making stuffed cabbage rolls tomorrow for dinner using the savoy cabbage from the garden. It will be a rice/hamburger/onions/tomato filling for the cabbage, braised in a seasoned tomato sauce. I've never made it before but will be following, essentially, a stuffed pepper recipe.

Adding cabbage to potatoes au gratin is a wonderful and tasty way to eat cabbage. Sautee the cabbage and then layer it in with the potatoes and sauce. Scrumptious.

Also good is to quickly sautee cabbage in a little olive oil along with some garlic, then add chicken broth and simmer it down. Add salt and pepper to taste.
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Old January 6, 2008   #25
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Oven roasted sprouts sounds wonderful. We have never fixed them that way because we like them so well steamed until just tender and served with some salt and pepper and maybe a touch of butter. (We have the same problem with asparagus from the garden--lots of wonderful sounding recipes but we like it so well with minimal doctoring up that we never try the recipes.)

Feldon, I agree, fresh, homegrown Brussel Sprouts almost always beat the pants off what you get at the grocery store.
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Old January 7, 2008   #26
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Large parts of south eastern Europe use pickled cabbage for cabbage rolls and salad. This year I tried pickling a few heads based on a Yugoslav recipe and it worked!!! If anyone is interested I can translate it for you to try.
Pickled cabbage is available in some stores here in Canada but is very expensive, about 8 dollars for a medium sized one.

Alex
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Old January 8, 2008   #27
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Granny's Hot and Sour Cabbage

Core a head of cabbage and cut it into 1" dice. In a large skillet or wok heat 2 tablespoons of oil. Add 1 medium onion, diced, and the cabbage. Quickly stir fry until the cabbage is heated through. Stir in a large spoonful of Chinese chili paste with garlic and about 3/4 cup of jarred sweet and sour/duck sauce. (We like the kind that comes in the quart jar with a yellow label available in many US grocery stores.) Cover and heat until the cabbage is hot and slightly wilted.

This has been one of my kid's favorites since they were quite small. Use an amount of chili paste to suit.
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Old December 3, 2008   #28
Earl
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Rena, I just made kraut. About 2 1/2 gallons. It's easy, not scary, and tastes wonderful. All you do is slice [with mandolin] the cabbage, put in a crock or jar in layers, salting each layer with pickling salt and packing cabbage down, until you are about to reach the top of container. Top off with salt water so cabbage is under water, then fill a zip loc bag with water and put it on top so cabbage stays submerged, then cover with a cloth. It has to stay under the liquid so it will ferment.

Let sit for a few weeks, checking on it to make sure the cabbage is still under water. After a week start tasting it until it ferments to your liking.

I'll be making my own kraut from now on.

Here's a recipe for a small batch:

SAUERKRAUT
Yields about 2 packed cups of kraut
Ingredients


Core, chiffonade & salt1.5 pounds of cabbage (about a medium head)
just under 1 Tablespoon salt (sea salt)
optional: juniper berries (make grandma proud), caraway seeds, celery seeds, kelp flakes, minced garlic, chili flakes
A glass jar
A smaller jar to fit inside
A clean tea towel
Rubber Band
Method

Wash all of your equipment well with hot soapy water and let it dry while you prepare the cabbage.
Peel the outer leaves of the cabbage off (you can save them for a liner for the weight).
Cut the cabbage in quarters, remove the core (if you don’t want it) and chiffonade the cabbage as thin as possible.
Fermenting a small batchPlace the cabbage in a large bowl and toss with the salt. Allow to sit 15 minutes or until it starts getting juicy.
Pack the cabbage into your jar (a medium head of cabbage fits nicely into a quart jar). I usually fill the jar half way and start tamping on it with a wooden spoon and adding more cabbage as I make more room. It’s surprising how much it compacts. You don’t want any air spaces and the goal is to have the cabbage completely covered by it’s own juices. If it’s not really juicy yet, let it sit 10 minutes then come back to it and tamp some more.
Once it’s packed tight and the juice level is adequate, place the outer leaves or a clean plate or a clean small jar on top of the kraut (this keeps the cabbage submerged in the juice so it can do it’s fermentation anaerobically). Place a weight on top of this (I usually use a small jar filled with beans to weigh it down). Then, cover it with a towel and tie it on with a rubber band (or string). Improvise with what you have around.
Put it in a cool, dry place and check on it every few days. If there’s mold, scrape it off, it won’t hurt you.
Some people like it really sour, i prefer a slight crunch and tang. In summer that’s about 3 days and in the winter it might take a week. Once it tastes how you like it, I put a lid on the container and keep it in the fridge. Once it’s in the fridge it lasts a long time. I haven’t had a batch go bad on me in the fridge yet, so I’m not sure of the shelf life. Repack the kraut every time you take from it to keep it in the liquid.

Great sandwich additionYou can really play around with added ingredients. I’ve heard of people adding grated beets, apples or brussel sprouts to the mix. You can add a lot of spiciness and make it akin to kimchi (which I made once and never again, it’s too hot for my taste). My current batch has kelp, caraway seeds and garlic in it. A classic is dill and juniper. I’d recommend starting off with 1 teaspoon and increasing spices to your desire. My current batch on the counter has 1/2 tsp black peppercorns, 1 tsp caraway seeds, 1/2 tsp celery seeds and 1 tsp kelp flakes. It should be interesting.
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Old April 24, 2011   #29
Suze
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Default Cauliflower leek soup

I can't take credit for this recipe because I got it from elsewhere. As soon as I have time to figure out the "elsewhere" I'll edit this post.

http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/low-ca...up/Detail.aspx

Made this yesterday, and it was just amazing. If you are into low carb (or even if you aren't), this is a really nice sub for potato leek soup.

I used 2x the garlic the rec called for (we love garlic) and also low sodium chicken broth instead of the veg broth specified. The leeks were from my garden, the cauliflower wasn't.

Low Carb Cauliflower Leek Soup

Ingredients:
* 2 tablespoons olive oil
* 3 tablespoons butter
* 3 large leeks, cut into 1 inch pieces
* 1 large head cauliflower, chopped
* 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
* 8 cups vegetable broth
* salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
* 1 cup heavy cream (optional)

Directions:
1. Heat the olive oil and butter in a large pot over medium heat, and saute the leeks, cauliflower, and garlic for about 10 minutes. Stir in the vegetable broth, and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer 45 minutes.
2. Remove the soup from heat. Blend the soup with an immersion blender or hand mixer. Season with salt and pepper. Mix in the heavy cream, and continue blending until smooth.
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Old April 24, 2011   #30
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Leave out the broth and it makes a great low carb substitute for mashed potatoes! Just adjust the cream to give the right texture. The leeks are optional.

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