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Old June 17, 2010   #16
Talonstorm
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Default Honey garlic grilled eggplant

Honey Garlic Grilled Eggplant

1 eggplant (2 if using small Italian eggplants)
1 Tbsp honey
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 mashed garlic cloves
1 tsp chili (optional)
2 tsp balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper
  1. Peel stripes of skin off the eggplant (looks striped). Slice eggplant into half inch thick circles.
  2. Lay on a large sheet of paper towels. Sprinkle eggplant with lots of salt on both sides and place on the paper towels. The eggplant will release lots of liquid. This will help get rid of bitterness (if any) and make the eggplant more succulent and less watery after it’s cooked. Let sit for 15 minutes, then dry both sides well with paper towels.
  3. In a large bowl, mix honey, olive oil, garlic, chili, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper to taste. Dunk both sides of each eggplant slice into this marinade.
  4. Preheat the grill to high. Grab a wad of paper towel with tongs, dip it in oil, and brush it on the grill.
  5. Place the eggplant slices on the grill, cover, and turn down the heat to medium. Grill until marked, about 3 minutes. Turn 90 degrees to make cross-hatch grill marks. Grill until marked, about 3 more minutes.
  6. Brush the slices with remaining marinade, flip and repeat the grilling procedure on the other side. Regulate heat so that the eggplant is browning, but not burning. Remove to a plate, and drizzle with olive oil.
This is my favorite eggplant recipe. It tastes great and it isn't fried like most of the other recipes I see.
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Old July 12, 2010   #17
nctomatoman
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Default Modified (relatively healthy!) Eggplant Parmesan recipe...with a twist.

Check it out - link to the recipe on my blog here.

http://nctomatoman.weebly.com/1/post...-parmesan.html

Found a way to combine eggplant with a few overgrown summer squash!
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Old July 12, 2010   #18
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Sounds yummy, Craig! I like to layer zucchini with the eggplant, too. I have not yet tried it with yellow squash but I'm sure it would be good. I slice mine a wee bit thicker than yours and brush with olive oil and sprinkle with parmesan, the broil on both sides until browned. Then layer pretty much like you did and bake with mozzarella and more parmesan.

I picked several yellow squash today and some sweet cherry peppers, loads of tomatoes and a few eggplant. I plan to make a version of ratatouille out of all that tomorrow. It's a slow cooker recipe and I posted it here a couple of years ago. At the end I toss in a big handful of fresh basil. Yum!

Your eggplant pics looks lovely! Thanks for sharing!
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Old August 14, 2011   #19
Zana
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Armenian Eggplant Appetiser – Imam Bayeldi

“Imam Bayeldi” is a Turkish phrase meaning “the priest fainted”. Legend has it that in an Armenian village many years ago (then under Turkish rule) a priest fainted from sheer delight on first tasting this sumptious dish. Here are two versions of this appetizer.

Version 1

INGREDIENTS
2 large eggplants, about one pound each
½ cup olive oil
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, sliced (I have been known to double that!)
½ green pepper, cut in strips
½ sweet red pepper, cut in strips
¼ cup chopped parsley
2 cans of tomatoes, crushed or 8 large tomatoes, diced
¼ cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon tomato paste
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon red cayenne pepper
1 cup water

DIRECTIONS
Wash eggplant, discard stem. Cut eggplant in half-inch rounds. Brush both sides of slices with olive oil, then, under preheated oven, broil 5-10 minutes on each side until lightly browned (or you could grill it until lightly browned).

Saute the onions in remaining olive oil until limp, about ten minutes, then add remaining ingredients and cook gently, uncovered, for five minutes. Stir occasionally.

Cover bottom of an 8-inch square pan with two or three spoonfuls of the sauce, layer half the eggplant slices over this, and spoon half the sauce and top with rest of sauce. Place sheet of aluminum foil over pan, tucking in sides.

Bake in preheated 350 degrees F oven for one hour, removing foil last ten minutes. Cool before serving.

Yield: 6 servings

Version 2

INGREDIENTS
6 baby eggplants
salt
½ cup olive oil
2 medium onions, sliced
4 cloves garlic, sliced thin (again, I up the garlic here)
¼ cup red and green pepper, sliced thin
1 tomato, chopped
¼ cup minced parsley
1 teaspoon salt
a dash of cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon paprika
2 cans of tomatoes, crushed or 8 large tomatoes, diced
14 cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon tomato paste
1 cup water
lemon wedges

DIRECTIONS
• Wash and stem eggplants. Peel off skin in three vertical lines about one inch apart to give a striped effect. Make a slit lengthwise without cutting through the eggplant. Salt eggplants generously and let drain in colander a half hour. Then rinse and pat dry.

• Heat olive oil in large skillet and brown the eggplants on all sides. Remove and set aside.

• Add the onions, garlic, pepper, tomato, parsley and seasonings to the skillet and sauté for ten minutes until onions are soft, stirring occasionally.

• Cool slightly then stuff the eggplant slits with this filling, pressing a few spoonfuls into each one. Place the eggplants in a pan with the slits facing up.

• Combine the canned / diced tomatoes, juice, paste and water until well blended and carefully pour over the eggplants.

• Cover and simmer gently for almost an hour over a medium flame or until eggplants are soft. If liquid evaporates too quickly, add more hot water to the pan. Cool, then serve with lemon wedges.

Yield: 6 servings

Zana’s Notes:
• I have been known to added minced hot peppers to the “stuffing” mixture, sometimes grilling them or smoking them first.
• I have also been known to add juliennes of carrots and celery to the layers in the first version, or to the “stuffing” mixture in the second version.
• You can add or decrease the amount of garlic to taste. I prefer more than what the recipe calls for, so I add more.
• I have also added minced/ground lamb or finely chopped fish, small shrimp, thin calamari rings, small scallops to the “stuffing” mixture or mixed with the tomatoes layer. Then this becomes more of a meat /seafood main dish.
• If you want this as a main dish, you can either increase the amounts, or use large eggplants for stuffing.
• I have frozen the stuffed eggplants before cooking. Reduce the cooking time to compensate for the softer texture of the eggplant after thawing.

Source: Armenian Cooking Today by Alice Antreassian

Last edited by Zana; August 14, 2011 at 11:23 AM. Reason: adding
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Old August 18, 2011   #20
Zana
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Creole Gumbo

(Serves 8)

Today's recipe is a masterpiece of the South. It requires patience, and a long shopping list to prepare, but you'll be infinitely impressed with your efforts when you prepare and serve this classic gumbo over rice. The recipe includes an ingredient often found in Southern cooking. FilÈ powder can be found in most cooking specialty stores. You'll find it and essential ingredient in Creole and Orleans-style cooking.

Ingredients:
3 slices Bacon
4 medium Onions, finely chopped
4 cloves Garlic, minced
2 whole Bay Leaves
2 Tbs. Green Bell Pepper, minced
1 Tbs. fresh Thyme, finely chopped
1 1/2 tsp. Granulated Sugar
Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper to taste
2 lb. fresh or frozen Okra, cut in 1/2-inch lengths
2 Tbs. Olive Oil
1 large Ham Bone, halved or split
1/2 lb. Chicken Wings, tips removes
1 lb. boneless Veal Stew Meat, cut in 1-inch cubes
1/3 cup fresh Parsley, chopped
4 ripe Tomatoes, peeled and cored
1/2 tsp. Tabasco Sauce
1/4 cup Worcestershire Sauce
Juice from 1/2 lemon
1 tsp. FilÈ Powder
2 lb. fresh raw Shrimp, shelled and de-veined
2 lb. Crab Meat
2 cups fresh Oysters
Freshly cooked rice

Cut the bacon pieces in half and put in a large soup kettle. Place over low heat and cook bacon until brown, then remove, drain on paper towels, and set aside.

Add the onions to the bacon drippings in the kettle and cook over moderate heat until golden brown, stirring constantly. Add garlic, bay leaves, green pepper, thyme, sugar, salt, and pepper, and cook slowly until green pepper is wilted. Add cut okra to the kettle and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Heat the oil in a large skillet and add the ham bone, chicken wings, and veal cubes. Cook over medium heat, making sure to turn the meats so they brown on all sides. Pour off any excess fat ant add the meats and bones to the kettle.

Pour a cup of water into the skillet and deglaze. (Use a wooden spoon to loosen all the browned bits that cling to the bottom and sides.) Pour the water and bits from the skillet into the kettle.

Add the parsley, tomatoes, Tabasco and Worcestershire sauces, and lemon
juice. Add just enough water to cover all ingredients. Bring the gumbo to a boil and reduce the heat to low. Stir in the filÈ powder, but do not boil the gumbo again. Simmer for about 30 minutes, then add shrimp, crab, oysters (with their liquid) and reserved bacon. Continue to simmer until the seafood is cooked through.

To serve, spoon a mound of cooked rice into the middle of a soup plate,
then ladle the gumbo around the rice.

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Old September 25, 2011   #21
Keiththibodeaux
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Default Anyone have a good recipe centered on Eggplant and Okra

Okra and Eggplant are abundant in the garden right now. Does anyone have a good recipe centered on the combo?
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Old September 25, 2011   #22
PaulF
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For me, there is no such thing as "good" eggplant or okra. There are a few who do eat that stuff. Sorry, couldn't resist.
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Old September 25, 2011   #23
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Do they have to be together? We use both in our traditional cuisines (mixed heritages in the family including Middle Eastern and Turkish), but I don't think I've seen them used together.
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Old September 25, 2011   #24
Keiththibodeaux
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Does not have to be together, just a fun anything will do. Already had a suggestion to bread and fry with a good cucumber/dill dipping sauce, both of which are also growing in my garden. That sounds nice. Now, just for a good cucumber/dill dipping sauce recipe, lol.
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Old September 25, 2011   #25
Zana
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Actually I have seen them both used in the same middle eastern dish - Armenian, Persian and Lebanese come to mind. You can adapt the recipe below to include both. I have many times. Yummmm.

Under - Recipes for “Other” Vegetables "Armenian Eggplant Appetiser – Imam Bayeldi"

- add about 2 cups of okra to this recipe and cut back to 1 large eggplant

If you're looking for separate Okra dishes (there are already some eggplant ones posted, but I'll post more of both if you're looking for separate ones too.
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Old September 25, 2011   #26
Keiththibodeaux
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zana View Post
Actually I have seen them both used in the same middle eastern dish - Armenian, Persian and Lebanese come to mind. You can adapt the recipe below to include both. I have many times. Yummmm.

Under - Recipes for “Other” Vegetables "Armenian Eggplant Appetiser – Imam Bayeldi"

- add about 2 cups of okra to this recipe and cut back to 1 large eggplant

If you're looking for separate Okra dishes (there are already some eggplant ones posted, but I'll post more of both if you're looking for separate ones too.
Zana, I was hoping to find something together just to kill to birds (abundances) with one stone (pot), lol.
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Old September 25, 2011   #27
Zana
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this is from a recipe group I subscribe to (there are pictures, if these don't come through, on the website of the different steps):


Chicken Gumbo with Andouille Sausage
[image: Chicken Gumbo with Andouille
Sausage]<http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/chicken_gumbo_with_andouille_sausage/>

*Gumbo! (Don't you just love the sound of that word?) Here's a classic from
Hank <http://honest-food.net/>. Enjoy! ~Elise*

Gumbo <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gumbo> is one of my favorite stews in the world. There are Cajun versions, Creole versions, gumbo from Alabama and from Mississippi. I've tried dozens of gumbos in my travels in the Deep South, and none have been bad. Some better than others, but this is a stew made with lots of patience and lots of love.

A gumbo hinges on its thickeners. A roux of flour and fat is the primary one, and is in almost every gumbo I've ever eaten. How dark you take the roux is your preference: Most Louisiana gumbo I've had relies on a roux that's almost the color of dark chocolate. Beyond the roux, you usually have a choice of a second thickener — okra or filé powder, which is the leaf of the sassafras tree, powdered.

My wild game gumbo<http://honest-food.net/wild-game/venison-recipes/venison-stews/wild-game-gumbo/>uses all three thickeners. Not really traditional, but I like it. This version, using chicken thighs and andouille sausage, uses only a roux and okra.

Gumbo almost always has a variety of spices in it, and a store-bought Cajun or Creole spice blend will do just fine here. But in case you live in a place where you can't get one, I've included a recipe for my spice blend below.

You have some leeway in making gumbo, as it is really just a melange of meats and veggies. Most gumbos use a lot of the "Holy trinity," i.e., celery, green pepper and onion, but not too many other vegetables. But there is no reason you can't make a vegetarian gumbo. As for meats, any will do. I
often use a slew of game meats in my gumbo, but so long as you use more than one you'll be fine. Chicken, andouille sausage and shrimp are a common trio. Beef, for some reason, is rare in gumbo.

Chicken Gumbo with Andouille Sausage Recipe

I include a recipe for my own Cajun spice blend, but you can use a commercial spice blend if you want. A word on the andouille sausage: try your best to find it. We've found it in regular supermarkets, and it comes fresh or smoked. Either is good. It can be spicy, however, so if you are
sensitive to spicy foods, lower the amount of cayenne in the recipe and use a mild Italian sausage.

Ingredients

- 1/3 pound bacon, diced
- 2-3 pounds chicken thighs, skin on
- Salt
- 1-2 pounds andouille sausage
- 1/2 cup peanut or other vegetable oil
- 1 cup flour
- 2 green peppers, diced
- 4 celery stalks, diced
- 1 large onion, diced
- 4 garlic cloves, minced
- 2 tablespoons tomato paste
- 1 quart chicken stock
- 1 quart water
- 1/2 to 1 pound okra, sliced into discs
- 3 green onions, chopped
- 1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped

*Cajun spice mix*

- 1 teaspoon black pepper
- 1/2 to 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
- 1 teaspoon celery seed
- 2 Tbsp sweet paprika
- 1 Tbsp garlic powder
- 1 Tbsp dried thyme
- 1 Tbsp dried oregano

Method

*1* Cook the diced bacon until crispy in a large stew pot set over medium
heat. Remove the bacon and set aside; you'll add it back in when you serve
your gumbo.

[image: chicken-gumbo-1.jpg][image: chicken-gumbo-2.jpg]

*2* Once the bacon is cooked, set the chicken thighs skin side down in the
bacon fat to crisp. Salt the meat side, which will be facing up in the pot.
Cook the chicken, without moving, for at least 4-5 minutes before trying to
turn the chicken over. Brown the other side of the chicken thighs.
Incidentally, you start with skin side down to render some fat, which you
will need for the roux.

*3* Remove the browned chicken thighs and set aside. Brown the sausages in
the fat, remove and set aside.

[image: chicken-gumbo-3.jpg][image: chicken-gumbo-4.jpg]

*4* If you want, measure how much fat is in the pot; it should be about 1/2
cup. Or, do what I do and add 1/2 cup peanut oil to the pot. Let this heat
up a minute or two, then stir in 1 cup flour. Stir this almost constantly
for the first few minutes, then every couple minutes or so thereafter. Turn
the heat to medium-low and cook this roux until it turns dark. How dark? I
like my roux the color of coffee with just a tiny bit of cream. You can go
all the way to chocolate brown, but be careful! If you burn your roux you
will need to start over and make it again. This whole process can take 30
minutes.

*5* While you are stirring and cooking the roux, bring the chicken stock and
water to a boil in a separate pot.

[image: chicken-gumbo-5.jpg][image: chicken-gumbo-6.jpg]

*6* Add to the roux the onion, green pepper and celery and mix well. Let
this cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, stir again
and cook for another 2 minutes. Mix in the tomato paste.

[image: chicken-gumbo-7.jpg][image: chicken-gumbo-8.jpg]

*7* Using a large ladle, add the hot chicken stock to the gumbo. It will
sizzle and seize up as the roux absorbs the liquid. Keep adding more stock,
stirring all the time and scraping the bottom of the pot, to incorporate all
the stock and all the roux. You might not need all 2 quarts, but add enough
to make the gumbo slightly more watery than you want it to be at the end —
remember you are going to cook this down for several hours. Stir in half the
Cajun spice mix, taste the gumbo, and add more if you want.

*8* Lower the heat to medium-low and add back the chicken thighs. Now you
can either eat the skin while it's still crispy, or toss it into the gumbo
and chop it fine later. I tend to do half-and-half. Simmer this gently,
stirring from time to time, until the meat wants to fall off the bones of
the chicken, about 90 minutes. Remove the chicken and let it cool a bit.

[image: chicken-gumbo-9.jpg][image: chicken-gumbo-10.jpg]

*9* While the chicken is cooling, cut the andouille sausage into thick discs
and drop them in the gumbo. Add the okra. Pick the chicken meat from the
bones and chop it roughly. Add it back to the gumbo. At this point you can
cook the gumbo for another hour, or up to several more hours, depending on
how cooked down you want the final stew to be.

*10* When you are ready to eat, add the green onions, parsley and bacon and
stir well. Serve over rice, or with good French bread.

*Yield:* Serves 10-12.
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Old September 25, 2011   #28
Zana
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Bean Okra Tomato Soup

1 Cup Beans, dried, navy, rinsed (or whatever kinds you prefer)
6 Cup Water
1 Ham bone
2 Large Ripe tomatoes, peel and chop
1 Large Onion, chopped
1 Large Eggplant, diced
3/4 Pound Okra
Salt & pepper to taste

• In a kettle, Dutch oven, etc. bring the beans and water to a boil; boil for 2 minutes.
• Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 1 hour.
• Add ham bone, tomatoes, eggplant and onion.
• Bring to a boil, cover and simmer 1 to 1 1/2 hours or until beans are tender.
• Add okra and simmer 15 minutes longer.
• Remove bone, cut off any meat and add meat to soup to reheat.
• Season with salt and pepper to taste.
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Old September 25, 2011   #29
Zana
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Creole Gumbo

(Serves 8)

Today's recipe is a masterpiece of the South. It requires patience, and a long shopping list to prepare, but you'll be infinitely impressed with your efforts when you prepare and serve this classic gumbo over rice. The recipe includes an ingredient often found in Southern cooking. FilÈ powder can be found in most cooking specialty stores. You'll find it and essential ingredient in Creole and Orleans-style cooking.

Ingredients:
3 slices Bacon
4 medium Onions, finely chopped
1 large Eggplant, diced
4 cloves Garlic, minced
2 whole Bay Leaves
2 Tbs. Green Bell Pepper, minced
1 Tbs. fresh Thyme, finely chopped
1 1/2 tsp. Granulated Sugar
Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper to taste
2 lb. fresh or frozen Okra, cut in 1/2-inch lengths
2 Tbs. Olive Oil
1 large Ham Bone, halved or split
1/2 lb. Chicken Wings, tips removes
1 lb. boneless Veal Stew Meat, cut in 1-inch cubes
1/3 cup fresh Parsley, chopped
4 ripe Tomatoes, peeled and cored
1/2 tsp. Tabasco Sauce
1/4 cup Worcestershire Sauce
Juice from 1/2 lemon
1 tsp. FilÈ Powder
2 lb. fresh raw Shrimp, shelled and de-veined
2 lb. Crab Meat
2 cups fresh Oysters
Freshly cooked rice

Cut the bacon pieces in half and put in a large soup kettle. Place over low heat and cook bacon until brown, then remove, drain on paper towels, and set aside.

Add the onions to the bacon drippings in the kettle and cook over moderate heat until golden brown, stirring constantly. Add garlic, bay leaves, green pepper, thyme, sugar, salt, and pepper, and cook slowly until green pepper is wilted. Add eggplant to the kettle and cook until almost tender (about 5-8 minutes). Add cut okra to the kettle and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Heat the oil in a large skillet and add the ham bone, chicken wings, and veal cubes. Cook over medium heat, making sure to turn the meats so they brown on all sides. Pour off any excess fat ant add the meats and bones to the kettle.

Pour a cup of water into the skillet and deglaze. (Use a wooden spoon to loosen all the browned bits that cling to the bottom and sides.) Pour the water and bits from the skillet into the kettle.

Add the parsley, tomatoes, Tabasco and Worcestershire sauces, and lemon
juice. Add just enough water to cover all ingredients. Bring the gumbo to a boil and reduce the heat to low. Stir in the filÈ powder, but do not boil the gumbo again. Simmer for about 30 minutes, then add shrimp, crab, oysters (with their liquid) and reserved bacon. Continue to simmer until the seafood is cooked through.

To serve, spoon a mound of cooked rice into the middle of a soup plate,
then ladle the gumbo around the rice.
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Old September 25, 2011   #30
habitat_gardener
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My favorite thing to do with eggplant is to make baba ghanouj -- which is basically hummus, but with cooked eggplant instead of garbanzo beans. I roast it whole or in chunks, put it in the blender, and add tahini, garlic, and lemon to taste.

My second favorite thing is to slice the eggplant, then put it in the oven until soft, I'm guessing 15-30 minutes at 350F. (I don't use oil for cooking and don't preseason.). I use the slices in sandwiches.

Okra is wonderful with tomato sauce, so you can add okra to any recipe you'd use with cooked tomatoes: spaghetti sauce, lasagna, etc. I also love the combination of tomato sauce, okra, and garbanzo beans.
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