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Old March 25, 2012   #46
Tracydr
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Wondering about the best way to grind the okra, once it's dehydrated?
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Old March 25, 2012   #47
Zana
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I have put mine in a food processor until I get it reduced down. Then I put smaller quantities in a coffee mill / grinder that I use just for herbs, spices and powders (not for coffee...lol). That works faster than a mortar and pestle.

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Old April 21, 2012   #48
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I'm doing this for sure! Will be a good way to sneak okra in to my unsuspecting husband, lol!
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Old April 21, 2012   #49
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As a followup, it works great. Good way to introduce Okra flavor into a few dishes without the slime. I plan to do it again this year, but on a much larger scale.
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Old April 24, 2012   #50
Tracydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keiththibodeaux View Post
As a followup, it works great. Good way to introduce Okra flavor into a few dishes without the slime. I plan to do it again this year, but on a much larger scale.
This is exactly why I thought it would be good for my husband. Okra is a very healthful vegetable but my husband doesn't like the texture. Plus, it's very easy to grow in AZ in the summer.
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Old April 24, 2012   #51
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Ground okra seeds and the whole pod has been dome for many years.

Here is a link.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...Dm__zw&cad=rja
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Old April 24, 2012   #52
Keiththibodeaux
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Now, that article has me thinking about running some through my juicer for the oil. Okra grows here like a weed. If you don't get the pods when they are small, and it is impossible to get them all, then they get too tough for cooking. That is what started my down the path of dehydrating and powdering. Extracting the oil may be yet another dimension.
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Old May 12, 2012   #53
Zana
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Thessaly Creamy Eggplant Pie - Greek

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 11 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : LowerCarbs Veggie

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3 large eggplants -- about 4 pounds total
salt -- to taste
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
6 large onions -- coarsely chopped
1/2 cup milk
4 large eggs
1 pound Greek feta cheese -- crumbled
freshly ground black pepper -- to taste
1 pound commercial phyllo dough sheets -- defrosted and at room temperature
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil -- to 4 tablespoons, for brushing phyllo

• Peel the eggplants and cut them into 1-inch cubes.
• Place in layers in a colander, sprinkling each layer with salt.
• Place a plate over the eggplants, place a weight on top of the plate, and leave the eggplants to drain over a bowl or the sink for 1 hour.
• Rinse with ample water and drain thoroughly.
• Pat the eggplant cubes dry.

• Heat olive oil in a large, wide pot over medium heat and cook the onions for a few minutes, stirring, to soften.
• Add the eggplant cubes, toss to coat with oil, and cook, stirring, until the eggplant is tender, about 8 minutes.
• Remove from the heat and let cool.
  • Beat the milk and eggs together and add them to the eggplant mixture.
  • Add the feta and toss everything together.
  • Adjust the seasonings with additional salt and pepper.
• Lightly oil a 13x18-inch baking pan that is 2 inches deep. Preheat the oven to
• 375F.
• Open the phyllo and place on a work surface.
• Cover with a cloth to keep it from drying out.
• Place the first sheet of phyllo inside the baking pan, allowing the excess to hang over the edge.
• Brush with olive oil.
• Repeat the next sheet, aligning it so that the excess hangs over the opposite edge.
• Brush with the olive oil.
• Repeat with 6 more sheets, letting the excess hang over the alternating edges so that there is enough excess phyllo to roll up and form a decorative rim once the pie is completely assembled.
• Spread the filling evenly over the phyllo.
• Cover with 6 more sheets, letting the excess hang over alternate edges and brushing over with olive oil.
• Take the bottom and top excess phyllo and roll it up together around the perimeter of the pie to make a rim.
• Sprinkle the top lightly with water and score the pie into serving pieces without cutting all the way to the bottom.
• Bake until golden, about 1 hour.
• Remove from the oven, cool for at least a half hour, and serve.


Makes 10 to 12 servings

AuthorNote: My mother-in-law introduced me to the eggplant pies from Thessaly.
There are many recipes for pie filled with eggplant, and the dish is something of a regional specialty, found very seldom in other parts of Greece. The filling is so substantial that, on first bite, most people think they are eating meat.

ChupaNote: I like to add red peppers and green onions or leeks to the eggplant in this pie. Sun-dried tomatoes and kalamata olives are also a good addition.

Cuisine: "Greek"
Source: "The Glorious Foods of Greece by Diane Kochilas, 2001"
S(Formatted by Chupa Babi):
"Oct 2011"
Yield: "1 pie"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 441 Calories; 27g Fat (67.3% calories
from fat); 13g Protein; 16g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 115mg Cholesterol;
696mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 2 1/2 Vegetable; 0
Non-Fat Milk; 4 1/2 Fat.

NOTES : Borek - Melitzanopita

Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Last edited by Zana; May 13, 2012 at 08:56 AM. Reason: correcting spelling
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Old May 13, 2012   #54
Tracydr
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That eggplant pie looks fabulous. I have so much eggplant. I'll have to give it a try. We have already had to big eggplant meals this week and it's just beginning.
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Old July 4, 2012   #55
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What a GREAT idea! I've never heard of doing this before, but I'm surely going to give it a try! I planted extremely late and we are just starting to cut the okra now. I found this article just in time! Thank you so very much!
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Old August 1, 2012   #56
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Default Okra, corn, and tomato sautee

This looks like a good okra recipe. I may be trying it soon. It came from weight watchers. If you do weight watchers it is two points per serving.

Ingredients
3 slice(s) uncooked reduced-fat bacon
1 spray(s) cooking spray
1 small uncooked onion(s), chopped
1 clove(s) (medium) garlic clove(s), minced
2 cup(s) frozen corn kernels
8 oz okra, sliced (about 2 cups)
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper, or less to taste*
1/4 tsp dried oregano, crushed
1/2 tsp table salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
1 cup(s) grape tomatoes, or cherry tomatoes, halved

Instructions
Brown bacon in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat, flipping several times, about 5 to 7 minutes; remove bacon and set aside.
Coat same skillet with cooking spray and set over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, until onion is tender, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add corn, okra, cayenne, oregano, salt and pepper; cook, stirring frequently, until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in tomatoes; cook until tomatoes are pulpy, about 2 to 4 minutes. Crumble bacon over skillet and serve. Yields about 3/4 cup per serving.
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Old August 1, 2012   #57
RebelRidin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifer28 View Post
This looks like a good okra recipe. I may be trying it soon. It came from weight watchers. If you do weight watchers it is two points per serving.

Ingredients
3 slice(s) uncooked reduced-fat bacon
1 spray(s) cooking spray
1 small uncooked onion(s), chopped
1 clove(s) (medium) garlic clove(s), minced
2 cup(s) frozen corn kernels
8 oz okra, sliced (about 2 cups)
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper, or less to taste*
1/4 tsp dried oregano, crushed
1/2 tsp table salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
1 cup(s) grape tomatoes, or cherry tomatoes, halved

Instructions
Brown bacon in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat, flipping several times, about 5 to 7 minutes; remove bacon and set aside.
Coat same skillet with cooking spray and set over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, until onion is tender, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add corn, okra, cayenne, oregano, salt and pepper; cook, stirring frequently, until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in tomatoes; cook until tomatoes are pulpy, about 2 to 4 minutes. Crumble bacon over skillet and serve. Yields about 3/4 cup per serving.
My mother used to make a very similar dish. She called it "Okra Succotash". It was delicious. I will have to try this. Thank you for sharing it.
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Old August 1, 2012   #58
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tht recipe looks good jen i will hve to try it .my grandma from turkey used to prepare okra all the time baked with tomtoes and some olive oil which ws delicious
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Old September 15, 2012   #59
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Roasted Okra

Author's Note: I bought way too much okra at the South Carolina State Farmers Market last week. I've pickled it. I've made soup with it. I've fried it. I've stewed it. I've made pilau with it. Today, I roasted it. Roasting is simple and creates an intensely flavored result. If you like okra, you will like it prepared this way. Roasting the okra makes it a little less slimy than steaming or stewing it. Next time, I will roast some grape tomatoes along with the okra.

INGREDIENTS
fresh okra, ends trimmed
olive oil
Kosher salt
pepper

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Place whole okra pods in a large bowl. Drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper; toss well. Spread okra in a single layer on a baking sheet. Roast in oven for 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, stir okra and return to the oven. Roast 5 more minutes.
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Old September 15, 2012   #60
Zana
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Simply Fried Okra

This recipe for fried okra is about as simple as you can get. There is no batter and no cornmeal. The results is like a okra chip; crispy, full-on okra flavor, and very addicting.

Simply Fried Okra

Fresh okra, trimmed (I remove the stem end)

canola oil
salt

Heat about 1 inch of canola oil in a frying pan (I use a cast iron skillet) over medium-high heat. If you have a thermometer, you are looking for a temperature of about 360 degrees.

Thinly slice okra lengthwise. You will get 4 - 8 slices per okra, depending on size.

Fry the okra in the hot oil in small batches until golden, about 2 minutes. Remove from oil, drain, and place on a plate lined with paper towels. Sprinkle with salt and serve.
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