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Old June 29, 2011   #46
tjg911
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Originally Posted by Medbury Gardens View Post
Ok so its possible that the one i have is misnamed i'll get a photo in the morning of it.
not sure what you mean but if it is referring to the color of the stalk swiss chard can have different stalk colors depending upon the variety.
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Old June 29, 2011   #47
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I grow Fordhook Giant and it has white stalks but last year I had one plant with green stalks. Strange to me but I do not know much about chard.
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Old June 29, 2011   #48
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not sure what you mean but if it is referring to the color of the stalk swiss chard can have different stalk colors depending upon the variety.
Thanks Tom,i didnt know that the name Swiss Chard referred to all the other various colours as well.

How does mine compare to yours Mudman

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Old June 30, 2011   #49
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your photo looks exactly my my forkhook swiss chard.

there's a variety called bright lights that has all different colored stalks - salmon, orange, pink, white, red probably a few others. i'm sure google images would have pictures, so do seed catalogs.

i grew a variety called ruby red. the stalks were red and the leaves a very reddish green color but it was not tolerant to frost so i stopped growing it. i found that odd as swiss chard can grow well into late fall tho weak sun and very cold nights, freezing ground and cold days make for very slow growth in november. in a cold frame or greenhouse i'm sure it would do better.

fordhook laughs at 20F! it grows thru shallow snow and if you water it it takes 90 degree heat too! a very versatile plant. i pick my leaves no longer than 9-10" as they are tender, larger leaves are a bit tougher and stronger flavored.

tom
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Old June 30, 2011   #50
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How does mine compare to yours Mudman
That looks like mine but mine seems to have more crinkled leaves. And you are growing a lot more than me!
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Old June 30, 2011   #51
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Wow! That look's so delicious! I have a lot of Fordhook's swisschard that is ripe for picking right now! I am going to try this recipe tomorrow..I have all ingredients on hand..I would make it today, but have been busy mudding drywall all morning..

Thank's for posting recipe and the yummy picture!

Ginny
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Old July 3, 2011   #52
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Excellent looking! I'll have to try this recipe some time.
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Old July 4, 2011   #53
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Now I have a reason to go out and beg my sickly looking swiss chard sprouts to actually grow....because that recipe looks divine!! Maybe I will have to check the farmers market for some if all else fails.

Thanks for the recipe!!
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Old August 20, 2011   #54
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that looks delicious! I am planting now a fall chard crop so I'll be sure to try your recipe, thanks!
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Old August 20, 2011   #55
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Marko..... Sounds and looks absolutely DELICIOUS!!!!!!!!! WILL definitely make it.

Thank you SOo much for sharing!!!

LarryD
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Old October 21, 2011   #56
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I finally had to cut all my chard, so had enough to try the soparnik. I really like it ... keep sneaking back to the stove top for another piece! My measurements were very approximate, I think I need to use a little less salt in the greens mix next time. Also, my dough needs to be rolled thinner. I think I was afraid of handling it too much, but afterwards I went and found some videos on YouTube, and that wouldn't have been an issue! I especially liked this one of the kids helping ... and cooking is done in actual ashes on a floor hearth.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7JDfDYtc0Y
And I marveled at how the cook handled her huge rolling pin and the fire on the adjacent brick table.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JvS1...eature=related
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Old October 23, 2011   #57
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Dee, the second video is from a Soparnik festival. This past summer I had a chance to try traditionally prepared soparnik. While walking on the Split (Croatia) farmers market I saw a woman selling soparnik and bought few pieces. It was perfect!
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Old October 27, 2011   #58
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KOLOCHKY / Kolaches

Pastry Dough

1 Cup Butter
1 / 8 ounce Cream Cheese
¼ teaspoon Vanilla
2 ¼ Cups Flour
½ teaspoon Salt

Filling

Prepared Solo Filling, flavor of choice-or- good quality jam

Directions

Blend dough & roll into balls about the size of a grape. Refrigerate for at least an hour. Roll out dough thinly on floured board to round or square shape. Fill as desired in the center of the pastry.

Bring one side over the filling to the other side. Slightly moisten the overlapping side so it will stick to the other side when you fold it over. At this point they can be frozen and baked off as needed. Bake @ 350 about 15 minutes or until lightly brown. When cool, sprinkle with powdered sugar.

Tip: If dough seems sticky when rolling into balls, don't be alarmed. They roll out just fine after being chilled. Yield:5-6 doz .

Rolling Method #2
Roll out dough to desired thickness, cut into circles or squares, fill each cutout and fold one side over the other to envelop the filling.

Zana’s Notes:

I like adding chopped swiss chard, onions and garlic as a filling – sometimes with ground beef or not. Sometimes substituting spinach or kale for the swiss chard.
I have done this with a fruit filling – whatever was in season.
I have also done this with a variety of different veggies added to the filling or just lots of fresh basil.
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Old October 27, 2011   #59
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Default Swiss Chard, Bok Choy, Spinach, Kale

Spanakopita (Greek Spinach Pie)

3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 bunch green onions, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 pounds spinach, rinsed and chopped
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup ricotta cheese
1 cup crumbled feta cheese
8 sheets phyllo dough
1/4 cup olive oil

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly oil a 9x9 inch square baking pan.
Heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Saute onion, green onions and garlic, until soft and lightly browned. Stir in spinach and parsley, and continue to saute until spinach is limp, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.
In a medium bowl, mix together eggs, ricotta, and feta. Stir in spinach mixture. Lay 1 sheet of phyllo dough in prepared baking pan, and brush lightly with olive oil. Lay another sheet of phyllo dough on top, brush with olive oil, and repeat process with two more sheets of phyllo. The sheets will overlap the pan. Spread spinach and cheese mixture into pan and fold overhanging dough over filling. Brush with oil, then layer remaining 4 sheets of phyllo dough, brushing each with oil. Tuck overhanging dough into pan to seal filling.
Bake in preheated oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until golden brown. Cut into squares and serve while hot.
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Old February 2, 2012   #60
stormymater
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Default Dirty Rice Stuffed Collard Rolls for Scott in Atlanta

I make my dirty rice the day before & let it chill overnight so I don't get as scalded. Collards can be prepped the day before too - both up to 2 or 3 days before fine. Really makes life easier & less scaldy to do parts ahead.


Dirty Rice -

In a medium saucepan, bring the gizzards, chicken broth, and water to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the gizzards are tender, about 45 minutes. Reserving the broth, remove the gizzards, and when they are cool enough to handle, mince them ( or several pulses in food processor - just don't make paste) and set them aside.


Saute the minced gizzards over medium heat in bacon grease (or olive oil) until browned, about 5 minutes.



Add the green and red bell peppers, the onion, scallions, carrots, parsley, garlic, salt, pepper, thyme and cayenne. Cook over medium heat until vegetables have softened, about 10 minutes.



Add the rice and reserved broth. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Stir once, reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the rice is just softening but still uncooked in center, about 15 to 20 minutes.



Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the chicken livers and saute until firm, about 5 minutes. Let the livers cool slightly, then coarsely chop them. Toss the chicken livers and sausage with the rice. Cover and let sit until cool enough to handle or chill overnight in the fridge.


Collards -

Pop your leaves off the collard stalk, starting at the bottom. You want palm-size or bigger - palm and a half or so for each roll. Use a knife to cut out stems. Tear the smaller leaves into bite sized pieces.

Wash leaves & stalks thoroughly.

Set an open kettle of salted water to boil. Blanch the leaves to be used until just pliable, no more than a few at a time or the bottom ones will cook too much.

Drain the water & layer the stalks in a dutch oven or other oven safe lidded pan & cover them with the torn smaller leaves. Crockpot awesome here.

Roll the dirty rice mix in the collards as you would do for cabbage rolls & pack them in on the beds of torn collards. Size will vary based on leaves & your skills/patience. Make it easy - plop filling on distal 1/3 of leaf, fold in sides over filling & roll 'er up towards you - tight as you can.

Pour in 1 quart of sauce (this is a bone of contention here - I like our home canned tomato sauce while my DF prefers tomato soup diluted by 1/2) & enough water to cover rolls. If you need more than 2 cups of water, use additional sauce to cover rolls. You want plenty of sauce to dip crusty garlic bead into while you eat the rolls.

Bake at 300 in covered pan/dutch oven for 2 hours - remove lid for second hour if sauce seems runny.

Serve hot or slightly warm. Freeze great. Microwave re-heat fine. Would be fine to use small leaves as shred in the rolls if you want.


This usually makes about 40 rolls. Your mileage may vary.
They are good. Real good.

I actually heated up a frozen quart bag of these tonight (knowing I needed to post this) to go with our venison meatloaf _ they were awesome.

Cook 'em up Scott!

Last edited by stormymater; February 2, 2012 at 01:03 PM. Reason: left out thyme - my bad
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