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Old September 9, 2014   #16
Father'sDaughter
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Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
Father's Daughter, sounds yummy. I've never used or heard of guero chile.

From what I found online, guero means blonde and the type of pepper referred to as a guero chile varies by location. My golden cayennes have a fair amount of heat and they're yellow, so I decided on one golden cayenne in place of both the chiles called for.
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Old September 9, 2014   #17
Worth1
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From what I found online, guero means blonde and the type of pepper referred to as a guero chile varies by location. My golden cayennes have a fair amount of heat and they're yellow, so I decided on one golden cayenne in place of both the chiles called for.

You are right here is a well known brand where I live.
These things are good.

These are also the same thing by Mezzetta.

I just bought a jar.


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Last edited by Worth1; September 9, 2014 at 04:16 PM.
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Old September 9, 2014   #18
Tracydr
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Ah, yes! My husband loves those. Any idea what variety they actually are?
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Old September 9, 2014   #19
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Ah, yes! My husband loves those. Any idea what variety they actually are?

I can 99% guarantee they are these.
Cascabella Peppers.
They go from light green to yellow to orange to red.
A very beautiful pepper to grow and eat.
Not stupid hot either.

I cant say enough good about these peppers along with, Jamaican hot yellow and red, Bulgarian carrot and yellow mushroom peppers.

Worth
http://www.tomatogrowers.com/CASCABE...ductinfo/9218/
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Old September 9, 2014   #20
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I can buy most of what I want in town.
The Chilli de Arbol is what I use the make pepper powder instead of Cayenne peppers it is much better.
http://www.tomatogrowers.com/CHILE-D...ductinfo/9250/
Chili Cascavel/ Guajillo is a good one also that I have.
http://www.tomatogrowers.com/GUAJILLO/productinfo/9638/


Here is who I buy from.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...rq59RIOcegrIOg

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Old September 9, 2014   #21
Tracydr
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I think that's what I grew last year but there was no label.
I put a bunch of them in some pickle brine in the fridge. My husband loves them.
I should have saved seeds but this summer has been insane.
Thanks for the tip for chile stuff.
I use about 3-4 different chiles for my chili or for tacos. I have about 2 pounds of each so it should have me set for a few months. I also brought 1 1/2 gallons of our fermented hot sauce with us. Should last at least half the year, lol. Tht stuff is burn your insides out hot!
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Old September 10, 2014   #22
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Speaking of hot sauce, this is good stuff:
http://www.hotsaucemall.com/hot-sauc...ot+Sauce/HH281

I was lucky enough to spend some time in St Lucia, and Baron hot sauce is on just about every table. I know it's not Tex-Mex, but it would be really good on Tex-Mex.
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Old September 10, 2014   #23
Tracydr
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I bought a Trinidad scotch bonnet sauce when we were in Bonaire. It was so good. Very fruity and complex and very hot.
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Old September 10, 2014   #24
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Thanks for the recipes I made a lot of chili powders this year and want to try them out. If good, I'll grow more next year. I wanted to smoke some, but I never had enough peppers at one time to warrent using so much charcoal and wood. I have a smoker. I would just use it without water.
Anybody have any suggestions as to which peppers make the best chipotle/smoked chili powder?
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Old September 10, 2014   #25
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I bought a Trinidad scotch bonnet sauce when we were in Bonaire. It was so good. Very fruity and complex and very hot.
I love jerk sauce and the Scotch Bonnet peppers are awesome! I grew a yellow. About 4 variations of the yellow exist. The one I have was rather mild. Maybe good for salsa, but not jerk. So I was really bummed about that. I bought Chocolate Scotch Bonnet seeds and they are hotter than habaneros.
So next year I expect a better sauce. I also have seeds for a red Scotch Bonnet, but I know the chocolate is hot. I may grow both next year.
The sauces from Jamaica are so good, I doubt I can ever achieve that level.
For a non hot pepper the Trinidad Perfume is a great seasoning pepper. It has the habanero flavor without the heat. Very aromatic, named correctly. Great stuffed with onions, chives and sour cream.
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Old September 10, 2014   #26
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Thanks for the recipes I made a lot of chili powders this year and want to try them out. If good, I'll grow more next year. I wanted to smoke some, but I never had enough peppers at one time to warrent using so much charcoal and wood. I have a smoker. I would just use it without water.
Anybody have any suggestions as to which peppers make the best chipotle/smoked chili powder?

Drew chipotle is the word for a smoked jalapeno.
Not just any smoked pepper.

Worth
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Old September 10, 2014   #27
drew51
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Drew chipotle is the word for a smoked jalapeno.
Not just any smoked pepper.

Worth
OK, that is what i wanted to know. Thanks! I suppose they are smoked in the ripe red stage?
Still though my question now is, anybody know any good jalapeno varieties to grow? As many exist! I never grew any jalapenos.
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Old September 10, 2014   #28
Worth1
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OK, that is what i wanted to know. Thanks! I suppose they are smoked in the ripe red stage?
Still though my question now is, anybody know any good jalapeno varieties to grow? As many exist! I never grew any jalapenos.

Yes red ones.

I dont bother with growing them as I have said before too cheap to grow I just buy what I want.
As for the chipotle I get them canned from the store in Adobe sauce.

Put a small can of this chopped up in your next batch of chili and it will give it a nice hot smokey flavor.
One can like this or smaller will do for a 6 quart batch of chili.
You can buy Adobo sauce by itself and use it to marinate any type of meat.

When you say chili powder do you mean like you would use in chili with other ingredients in it?
Or do you mean just powdered peppers.

Would it be fare to say that you guys in the east and up north dont have some of these products there?

I think this one is the most common one grown here.
At least it looks like it.
http://www.tomatogrowers.com/JALAPEN...ductinfo/9348/

Worth
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Last edited by Worth1; September 10, 2014 at 12:00 PM.
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Old September 10, 2014   #29
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Here we have close proximity to virtually every kind of ethnic restaurant as well as HUGE international markets that cater to just about any needed ingredient. There are even markets that cater to specific regional needs. With the world's busiest international airport folks from all over flock to Atlanta and have some communities carved up into their own turf. What I have yet to find is a truly authentic Mexican restaurant; almost all cater to the anglo tastes or are TexMex. Used to love to travel to San Jose when the Silicon Valley was the Santa Clara valley and enjoy blue corn tortillas and dishes with cream based sauces, not just chile or tomato based.

Too, I have traveled all over Mexico and loved the differences in the regional cuisines. The best thing ever was empanadas con pollo cooked atop a 50 gallon drum by an old, old lady. However, when she handed me arroz con pollo with countless numbers of flies making kamikaze dives into the pot, I made a starving dog around the corner of the Acapulco Princess very happy.

My secret to avoiding enteritis was a constant flow of Tequila immediately after eating. It was so hot out that it sweated right through me. Have yet to find empanadas here. When I saw all of the meat arrayed on a plywood sheet in the markets, again swarming with flies and sitting all day in the hot sun, I thought the folks there must have incredible natural immunities. Now, thanks to Rick Bayless, I would love to travel around Baja, but those days are past.

One last note, we are now seeing restaurants that specialize in the cuisines of central and south America, as well as the Caribbean countries. Delicious! Even found a real eastern NC style BBQ place now.

With the vote on the 18th in Scotland we may some day see Haggis and blood sausage. That would be a real change from the morning sausage biscuit! Wonder if I could find cuy in Atlanta.
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Old September 10, 2014   #30
drew51
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Yes red ones.

When you say chili powder do you mean like you would use in chili with other ingredients in it?
Or do you mean just powdered peppers.

Would it be fare to say that you guys in the east and up north dont have some of these products there?


Worth

On chili powder I mean both. I make both just peppers, peppers with roasted cumin, etc.
I live near Detroit, I could go to Mexican town and get any products I want.
Every product imaginable. In Lansing we have a Mexican population too. A tortilla factory is there too. El Azteco restaurant is owned by a Tex-Mex gentlemen. Of Mexican heritage from Texas. He told me he uses his grandmother's recipes. The enchilada's are to die for. One type, Enchiladas De Jocoque, I have never seen anywhere else, they are my favorite. Everytime I'm near Lansing I buy 6 dinners to go. Everybody that works in the restaurants, the landscapers, the roofers are all Mexican in this state.
http://www.elazteco.me/ELAZTECO.ME/restaurant.html
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