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Old September 10, 2014   #31
mensplace
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Did you ever try the Menudo? I tried it once in Gainesville, GA and got past one spoonful. Not quite the same a French Tripes a la mode! They may have been lightly rinsed once, but smelled and tasted like large intestine and all that they process. The only food ever that I couldn't eat.

Their menu of the restaurant you kindly posted is so different from those locally here. Always some combination of bland beans, bland rice, some beef or chicken, and a bit of cheese on the top for the Anglos and flour tortillas by default.
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Old September 10, 2014   #32
Tracydr
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I'm not a big Menudo fan.
I do love posole, although I've never made it.
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Old September 10, 2014   #33
Worth1
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I'm not a big Menudo fan.
I do love posole, although I've never made it.
Me neither but I do love pozole/posole which is just another name for hominy.
We used to make it at home with dried corn and lye.

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Old September 14, 2014   #34
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Worth,

I'm wondering what kind of brine are those guerito peppers in? Is it a sweet brine, I mean, or salty or sour?

My Guerito plants are so loaded with peppers. They are pretty hot, too, so more than plenty for seasoning random meals already dried and frozen... I'd like to pickle some.

Also, nice to see some green chile recipes here... I've never done it, so I can't help wondering, how do you peel a roasted chile without getting your fingers super spiced?
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Old September 14, 2014   #35
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Bower,

When I pickle hot peppers I wear 2 layers of surgical gloves when doing the peeling/handling....and have been known to wear my scuba mask so that I can't touch my nose or eyes inadvertently. (Unfortunately, pickling season coincides with fall allergy season which doesn't make for safe handling without the mask.)

I've done them in a dill-garlic brine or just garlic brine or a spice brine that my Aunt in Jamaica used to use....and I've experimented. It all depends on what combo of peppers I've got to work with....and the degree of heat and whether I'm doing mixed pepper batches or just single varieties.
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Old September 14, 2014   #36
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Worth,

I'm wondering what kind of brine are those guerito peppers in? Is it a sweet brine, I mean, or salty or sour?

My Guerito plants are so loaded with peppers. They are pretty hot, too, so more than plenty for seasoning random meals already dried and frozen... I'd like to pickle some.

Also, nice to see some green chile recipes here... I've never done it, so I can't help wondering, how do you peel a roasted chile without getting your fingers super spiced?
Bower my guess would be a mix of 50% water 50% 5% vinegar and some salt.
they are very cruncy.
you should try to find some and see what you think.

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Old September 14, 2014   #37
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Thanks, Zana and Worth.
I sort of suspected a snorkeling outfit might be fit. Really the Gueritos are not superhots though. Cayennes and Santakas are hot enough I won't try em raw. So far for chopping, scrubbing my fingers with a lemon or lime afterwards is good enough if I'm careful. Then I lick my fingertips to test if I got it all. Just thinking I have no idea how hard it is to peel a roasted chile.... I have a tendency to get my paws into stuff like that.

Worth, I have no idea if they even sell them up here, but for sure I'll keep an eye out. Crunchy pepper pickles are the best! Mexican food is pretty popular up here, but really it can't be the same as you get down there, just a small slice of it is all we get for sure..

I remember empanadas and arroz con pollo from Colombia, but don't know if they are the same as Mex or perhaps a bit different. I don't have a recipe, it was so long ago..
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Old September 14, 2014   #38
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I've not noticed that green chiles are really hot enough to burn fingers but if you're concerned, just wear some medical gloves. I do keep a box in my kitchen for cutting up really hot peppers.
Peeling a roasted chile is quite easy. I do it under the faucet to help rinse off bits.
The key is to get all sides of the chile fairly black and blistered. Then, steam in a plastic bag until cool.
I roast mine on my indoor grill. They smell wonderful and it's just easier than starting the grill. I've burnt some when using the oven and find the grill burner is easier to keep an eye on.

Last edited by Tracydr; September 14, 2014 at 05:26 PM.
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Old September 14, 2014   #39
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I use a wood fired grill bare hands.

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Old September 15, 2014   #40
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My neighbor from Oklahoma frequently talks about how much he misses "Charro Beans". Sounds like Pintos with some spices and maybe salsa mixed in?
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Old September 15, 2014   #41
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Originally Posted by mensp
My neighbor from Oklahoma frequently talks about how much he misses "Charro Beans". Sounds like Pintos with some spices and maybe salsa mixed in?
I eat them here in Texas not hard to make.



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Old September 19, 2014   #42
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My neighbor from Oklahoma frequently talks about how much he misses "Charro Beans". Sounds like Pintos with some spices and maybe salsa mixed in?
That is it basically. Pinto beans with garlic and onion powder, comino or cumin, salt, pepper, and chopped onions.

To make Charro beans a meal: Add chopped Cilantro, Jalapeno, Serrano, TOMATO, shredded cheese, and top it with sour cream. Of course, you could toss in any kind of meat you like, but that is optional
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Old September 19, 2014   #43
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Thank you so much for the recipe! I'm always looking for good bean recipes. We frequently have pinto beans and cornbread, so this should kick it up a notch. Grew tired of red beans and rice with the small red beans and typical Cajun approach. Have recently been enjoying Cuban style black beans and learned that the key is to cook them until soft, not hard little nuggets. Love Great Northerns, but more like a soup/stew with a bit of pork. Have never been able to make a decent Boston style baked beans as the beans always remain hard and I always muddle up the spice and other flavorings. I would think the Charro beans would be better with cornbread than with rice. With it being cooler recently, I am looking forward to a good bowl of Chili soon in the traditional style with lots of dried chiles. Need to find the best blend of varieties to add some interest and depth.
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Old September 19, 2014   #44
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Now you guys are making me hungry for a good plate of beans and cornbread. I think I'll go with the meal version with peppers, tomatoes and cheese.

There is a whole bush of habs out there that I need to figure out what to do with. I like some heat but not extremely hot. A friend has a delicious recipe for Habanero Gold Jelly but I only need so much jelly.
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Old September 19, 2014   #45
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Now you guys are making me hungry for a good plate of beans and cornbread. I think I'll go with the meal version with peppers, tomatoes and cheese.

There is a whole bush of habs out there that I need to figure out what to do with. I lot some heat but not extremely hot. A friend has a delicious recipe for Habanero Gold Jelly but I only need so much jelly.
How about locking the thread so far it is very popular.
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