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Old July 2, 2016   #46
Worth1
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I am so happy I am not doing gun shows anymore.

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Old July 3, 2016   #47
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At least there was no sign....... Fresh surplus tomatoes "Dumped " in from China

sheeeesh !
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Old July 3, 2016   #48
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Cole the Sam Walton of the farmers market.

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Old July 3, 2016   #49
DjonesNC
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Cole Robbie,
Because this is America & capitalism is king, I wouldn't budge an inch. You said it yourself, you have a better product, heirlooms which have superior flavor hands down. That right there would be your greatest selling point and an opportunity to educate customers who frequent that market. Personally, I would stand by my product and also challenge customers to find out for themselves, the quality and flavor of your produce compared to any of the tomatoes offered by the hybrid henchmen.
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Old July 3, 2016   #50
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Exactly. People like this troublemaker don't understand the marketplace. Competition! You can't complain about the competition. You have to treat the competition with respect. And if someone is doing better than you, or pricing differently, or taking market share you hoped to get, you have to use your smarts to change what you're doing to be more competitive. The one thing you can never do is expect the winner of the game to accomodate your losses!
That's not how it works.

And yes, I have found myself in a very similar situation - with a raw newbie who had no concept, apparently, that this is how a free market works. She was really ticked off that I had no sympathy for her. Too bad, this is reality. Go to the marketplace and there you will find competition!

And I've also been on the flip side, where a similar competing product at a low price grabbed the best part of the market share. Several times. It's not pleasant to lose out, but you suck it up, smile, and do what you can to do better next time. You have to stay creative to stay competitive in the marketplace. And think about, what is the competition doing right? that made it more profitable for them this time. And another thing, if someone seriously undersells you when you're charging a reasonable price, they either don't have the quality or they aren't making much of a return. In both cases it's a flash in the pan, you may have a bad day but it's not going to change market realities for the long term. Grin and bear it.

two and a half cents.
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Old July 3, 2016   #51
GrowingCoastal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deborah View Post
What I finally did was to put a stern note on his door. I informed him that surveillance and harassment are against the law, and that if the behavior continues I won't hesitate to file a police report and to have an officer at his door. And now we wait...
Deborah, you are not alone. I live on my own with my little dog.

The last time my one cranky neighbour flipped out on me was when I put up a 'no smoking' sign on the side of my garage. After he ranted at me about the sign I asked him why I had to inhale when he smoked, that I understood he was trying to hide it from his family but why did I have to share? This was something he had just started doing and would light up as soon as his wife left the house; intlerable when she left for a week! Pretty sure he was also smoking something other than tobacco which is neither here nor there to me but might be outrageous to his wife. The smoking stopped and I took down the sign. Problem solved.

I do not like being verbally attacked over the fence and plan on telling him that I will get a restraining order if he does again. It hasn't happened too often over the years but is upsetting when it does. I got the last scenario on video along with the one where he took a hammer to smash down the top loops of my chain link fence at one end without a word to me. Where he has tied in his fence to the one on this property is visible for anyone to see, again without a word to the new owner who is now my landlord. ( I sold my place but get to stay on enjoying my garden.)
That neighbour tried to ruin my relationship with my landlord, as well, out in the street one day. I tried to ignore it but he was still at it when I stepped out again so I confronted him and he left crying vendetta. I feel sorry for his family when he rants at them about whatever over and over again. I think others do too.
I try not to return the nastiness. For example, I have not complained to the city about the three dogs when by-laws say only two are allowed. I trim the flowers from the laurels that I know make them sneeze with allergies but I doubt they notice or appreciate it.

I haven't found a better place to move to so stay on. Sometimes it is better the devil you know. I had built a second fence to block them out and that works for me.
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Old July 3, 2016   #52
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Bower I got a reality check many years ago about people.
I wanted to make high end furniture and did make and sell some for a vewry good price.
But one day I was in Wall Mart and some gal said to her husband, "why would I pay $1,000 for an entertainment center when I can buy one here for $98.95?"
Well I could have told her but she wouldn't understand.
This attitude has totally wiped people like me out as far as the general public is concerned.

I should have been born 100 years ago.

I could not explain to one low rent guy the difference in open pollinated tomatoes and store bought.
He was insulting so I just told him he didn't have enough class or good taste to understand quality and taste.
And he was no more than a commoner.
Boy did that ever tick him off.


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Old July 3, 2016   #53
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Worth, the hand built furniture and the Walmart furniture are not really the same product, even though they serve the same function. To make a business of fine furniture, you have to find the right marketplace for it.
As I see it, the big issue with high end furniture as a product, is that every piece is a high ticket item. It is simply the nature of the beast that big ticket items take longer to sell, which means you have to have deep pockets while you're waiting to sell something.
Also the marketplace for these items may be expensive to access (that is, a physical market where you can display your work). The internet can help with that, but then you have the issue that large items must be moved over large distances, and people also want physical contact with the piece before they are certain about spending a lot of money. You would almost be better off looking for a regional market to display your work and build it from there. Once again, you will have costs up front but will have to wait for cash to flow. People who are interested in your work may also ask for custom instead of taking home what is already made. Custom can be tricky and lossy if you're not careful, but it can also be a source of cash flow to keep you going while waiting for sales, and first step to building a clientele. It is a bit of a patience game, but mostly you have to have enough capital in the first place that you don't starve waiting.
IMO one key to a successful business model is to have a range of products which includes lower price points, which will sell quickly and keep some cash flow to the business. In furniture I guess something well made with great materials but simple and small. If you can design an item that is pleasing or unique in some way but you can crank em out and sell the piece under $100 while still paying yourself a wage after materials cost, then some of the people who admire the $2000 piece will scoop up the thing they can afford and be really pleased, and so your name also starts to go around and your work is being displayed in people's homes. Not saying those price points exactly but you get the gist. Small is also beautiful for shipping purposes, so a small item that's a few hundred dollars - say a beautiful lamp for example - could be sold by internet more easily than a dining table. If your pieces have a style that makes them suit or 'match' one another, then the smaller sales will lead to bigger ones.
Hubby I bought this lamp and you should see the living room suite that goes with it...
So I wouldn't say it can't be done, but you have to have capital to get you started, and determination to succeed, and perseverance to wait for cash flow, to go from zero to a viable business of mostly big ticket items.
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Old July 3, 2016   #54
Worth1
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Bower this was almost 30 years ago when it happened.
Since then I have had people see some of my stuff welding wood work and other wise and they would say I want something like that how much do you charge?
I will give a price and they say I can get that at the store for so and so amount.
I then say no you cant but go head on.
I know some Mennonites that tried to sell good stuff here and lost out.
I bought a solid cherry wood armorie from them made by the Amish.
The thing is sweet.

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Old July 3, 2016   #55
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Worth, anyone who thinks your work is equivalent to what is in the store is a nutbar!
Shame if the people are so stoked up on trashy stuff they don't value quality any more.
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Old July 3, 2016   #56
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My favorite thing about wal-mart furniture is that it is easy to throw away. I have been moving out of a house before and had the realization I no longer wanted a piece of furniture. One good heave into the air, and the first impact with the ground reduces it to a nice, neat pile of particle-board pieces.

The desk I've had for several years is a giant steel thing from the 1950's. No one is going to throw this thing very far. I paid $25 at a Goodwill store for it. It's not a valuable antique, but at the same time, I don't see desks like this ever being made again.
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Old July 3, 2016   #57
Worth1
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Dude that thing is original retro.
Retro brings a good price in the right areas dont kid yourself.

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Old July 3, 2016   #58
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I think somehow the grower who understands the value and taste difference of the heirloom tomato must communicate that "Value" effectively ...
Maybe it helps to grow your own personal favs as well as the market favs ....as then

It sure doesn't help anyone to get into an almost ..negative bond situation ....where you almost have to pay someone to take your product !

Perhaps it makes a good difference to be a "Best Customer" of your product and your sincerity will shine through and help move product !
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Old July 3, 2016   #59
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Going rate was $1.75 last Saturday, and I set mine at $2, still sold everything.
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Old July 3, 2016   #60
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Hard to make a buck on anything in season.
Push the seasons as far.as you can, and don't tell anyone how good you are doing.
Dont be afraid to try dry beans, people are crazy for them. Sshh don't tell anyone.
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