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General discussion regarding the techniques and methods used to successfully grow tomato plants in containers.

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Old February 28, 2017   #46
MuddyToes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
So far, I have these written as suggestions:

Basil
Chives
Cilantro
Dill
Lavender
Lemon grass
Oregano
Parsley
Rosemary
Sage
Tarragon
Thyme

I left out mint because we already have Apple, Mojito, and some other mint growing.
Leave lots of room for the lemon grass. It gets huuuge.
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Old February 28, 2017   #47
AlittleSalt
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"I have cilantro in the garden right now that overwintered. I can't get it to germinate in the summer. It's too hot here."

I stopped and said aloud, Wow, too hot in Delaware to germinate cilantro in summer." It is a small world we live in sometimes. Cilantro can bolt here in late May depending on the temperatures. The same is true with spinach, beets, and turnips. Once the temperature gets 95 and above - those crops smell spoiled and forget eating them.

One more herb that we are going to look for is catnip. There are always cats around here. However, I'll plant it somewhere away from the gardens. Then they can roll in it a purr to their heart's content.
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Old March 1, 2017   #48
SueCT
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Wow, I thought you want to stick to the most used few to start with. You better have quite a few of those pots for all those herbs, or change to digging an herb garden. I get most of those into a 4x4' herb harden with a few in pots or along the main garden border, like chives and mint which can take over, and cilantro, which bolts quickly and does not get a permanent home in the herb garden. I love herbs, and having fresh ones to use any time I want is a treat. Do you have the indoor space for all those when those 100 degree temps you were talking about hit and you want to bring them indoors?
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Old March 1, 2017   #49
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My parsley
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Old March 1, 2017   #50
AlittleSalt
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Sue, while I have grown some herbs, I am really just learning about different ones. Yes, there is plenty of room to grow some herbs inside during the dog days of summer and the cold days of winter too. While I have a good idea of how - I need to learn more.

This thread has opened my eyes to new thoughts and ideas. I had no idea about Lemongrass growing so large, and so many of the other herbs. To me, Rosemary sounds like it is worth growing for the fact that it flowers during the hot days of summer. I hope we like the way it tastes, but seeing flowers in July and August is enough reason to grow them. Some, like rosemary, are perennials - I've had good luck with perennial flowers without cutting them back after first frost. I've learned that if you do cut them back and then covering them in leaves - they can withstand much colder temperatures.

Our main garden is fenced-in 45' x 45' but there are 3' wide beds outside the fences. Our actual garden size is 48' x48' In autumn, the fences catch the blowing fallen oak leaves and cover the beds - more so the northern and southern beds. That's why we have success growing perennials in those 3' sections.

I'm learning.
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Old March 1, 2017   #51
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Salt... if you don't want to go through all the stratification of Lavender seeds, ( of which I have never done with mine and things grew fine) get you a Bonny Plant.

Yes, I know there lots of complaints about their plants. I've complained on and off too, but last year they had some Fern Leaf Lavender in 4" pots for $2.50. I said heck, let me try one as I hadn't seen it before. I brought it home, removed all the peat wrapping from outside the plant, removed almost all the soil and replanted it in my mix and it grew beautifully. Loved the heat and drought and flowered all season long. It did better than alot of other Lavenders I have had and it stayed nice and neat in a 6" pot.
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Old March 1, 2017   #52
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So far, we found and bought these seeds -

Basil - Sweet
Catnip - (Nepeta Cataria)
Chives
Cilantro
Dill - Long Island Mammoth
Oregano
Rosemary (Rosemarinus Officinalis)
Sage - Broad Leaf
Thyme - Common (Thymus Vulgaris)

I took a leaf from a Bonnie Plant - Rosemary. It's like a smoky pine scent and taste.

The locally owned plant nursery should be open next week. We're going to see if they have herb transplants before buying them anywhere else.
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Old March 1, 2017   #53
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Bonnie had some nice rosemary plants at my local farm store yesterday. 8-10" tall, priced at $4.
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Old March 1, 2017   #54
SueCT
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With all that space, then, you might want to consider using the containers only for the herbs that will need to be shielded from the intense heat. Rosemary in your zone does make a beautiful shrub, not to mention a useful one. Dill is wonderful, esp. for fish and potato salad, as mentioned previously, but probably not a suited to containers due to how tall it can get. It also goes to seed fairly quickly, and if you like growing it you will probably have to do succession planting. Cilantro bolts quickly in the heat as well, and would do better out of the heat. Sage gets quite large and is probably better suited to an outdoor location than a pot, although it can be grown in one. Be careful of tarragon. True french tarragon is propagated mostly from division, and many commonly available tarragon plants are not true french tarragon that is used in cooking but a more easily seed propagated Russian tarragon that does not have the same flavor. It also can grow quite large although it has more of a grassy look than the others. If you are not confining yourself to what can go in pots, the sky is the limit! You could have so much fun experimenting this spring and summer!
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Old March 1, 2017   #55
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Pork or beef schnitzel with white dill gravy with sour cream in it is to die for.

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Old March 3, 2017   #56
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I have planted many small seeds before, but Oregano HAS to be the smallest ever.

I'm about to plant 12 cells of Rosemary. I really like the way it smells!
...Worth, I know you're laughing after reading this.
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Old March 3, 2017   #57
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Bergamot and Wild Fennel are another couple herbs (perennials) you may want to add.

I have poppies for my own poppy seeds, garlic chives as well as the regular, shiso, tulsi (holy basil), african blue basil, lemon verbena, pineapple sage, anise, horehound, calendula. You can definitely grow your own capers and peppercorns in 8a.

And I think you can you grow Roselle there? It's a hibiscus that can be used for jams, sauce, or tea. The leaves can also be added to a salad.
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Last edited by MissMoustache; March 3, 2017 at 08:33 PM.
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Old March 3, 2017   #58
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Dried hibiscus flowers are cheaper than dirt at the Mexican market.
Look for it under the name Jamaica.
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Old March 3, 2017   #59
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The fresh ones are juicy and tart (but not quite as tart) like cranberries. Worth growing if you have the space in my opinion.
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Old March 4, 2017   #60
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I kept meaning to mention Garlic Chives and forgetting. I like them better than regular chives.
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