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Old March 4, 2008   #16
Earl
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neoguy,
Sure, I don't see why not. I'd heat the dutch oven first and do as suggested in the original recipe. The bread is full of nice holes like a good ciabatta bread. It should work in any thing with sides as it's a wet dough and probably slouch out it not supported, but would even be good cooked that way.
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Old March 4, 2008   #17
kygreg
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Or smear some home made jelly, jam, or preserves in it.
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Old April 10, 2008   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coronabarb View Post
bread recipes here
Did you forget the link or do you mean that you want some bread recipes?
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Old April 18, 2008   #19
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I suspect that cutting the recipe in half, and only using 3.5 cups of flour, would work in the dough cycle of a bread machine which can make a 1.5lb loaf. You'd be able to adjust the flour after the rising, and before finishing the bagels by hand. The only thing I'd change would be to add a resting period between adding any extra flour, and shaping the bagels, just to let the moisture redistribute itself properly.

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Old December 3, 2008   #20
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Except for the sweetener, cutting the recipe in half is about how I do plain bread dough with the bread machine dough cycle. I also use rapid rise yeast so will cut back the yeast to 2 teaspoons. I'll post how they come out when I get around to making them.
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Old December 4, 2008   #21
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Some things I'd like to throw out there. I don't know how they adjust to this recipe.

Active Dry Yeast pretty much requires no proofing and less time to rise. And as Earl mentioned Rapid Rise yeast you need less of it.

Also if you need a warm place to let dough rise, run a toaster or other oven at 200 degrees until it is preheated. Turn it off and keep the door closed. After about 10 minutes, it will be ready to let dough rise much faster than room temp.
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Old July 28, 2009   #22
Zana
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Default Hye Hatz (Armenian Thin Bread) #1

I'm going to post a few different versions here. All are from either family recipes or cookbooks that my mother and grandmothers or aunts have gosh darnoodley near worn out or actually did! (I've since replaced a few, luckily in the past few years.)

Hye Hatz (Armenian Thin Bread) #1

5 lbs. flour
2 cups bacon fat (or butter or oil of choice), melted
2 tablespoons salt
2 yeast cakes (dissolve in 1 cup lukewarm water)
1 tablespoon sugar
about 4 cups lukewarm water

Make a depression in cetre of flour, gradually mix in remaining ingredients. Add enough water to make a soft sough and knead well. Cover and set in warm place for 3 to 4 hours, to rise.

Make 24 balls, cover with wax paper, and let set for 10 minutes. Roll out each ball of dough on a lightly floured board to 1/8 inch thickness, using a dowl (long type rolling pin). Roll out as wide as the width of your oven. ♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫ dough with fork. Roll each circle of dough around the dowl; unroll dough on bottom rack of oven.

Back in 400 degree F oven until bottom is lightly browned. Turn over if you want brown on both sides. If you want it crispy like lavash, bake with the oven door open. Do not close oven door when baking. The result will be soft bread which is delicious, but not crispy.

This bread keeps for weeks, if stored in a dry place. If you want to use hye hatz for sandwiches - - sprinkle lightly on both sides with water, wrap in a towel, and let stand 10 - 15 minutes.

Variations/ Hints:

You can add herbs and spices to the dough: rosemary leaves, cumin, cracked pepper, thyme, caraway seeds, dill seeds, toasted sesame seeds, whatever your taste.

You can brush the dough with beaten egg and you can sprinkle herbs and spices on top too.

Before baking you can score the dough in uniform rectangles for easier storage.
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Old July 28, 2009   #23
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Wow, you must be cooking away the last few days, Zana! Thanks for all the recent recipes!
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Old July 28, 2009   #24
Zana
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Default Armenian Thin Bread #2 (Parag Hahtz[Hatz] / Arabkir Hahtz)

5 cups lukewarm water
2 1/4 oz packages active dry yeast
1 tsp sugar
5 lbs flour, plus extra flour for dusting work area
2 tsps salt
1/4 lb. melter butter or crisco
2 eggs, optional
1 tbsp olive oil

Directions:

1. Pour 1/4 cup of water into a small bowl, add the yeast and sugar, stir to dissolve, then cover and set aside to proof.

2. Add flour into a large mixing bowl, sprinkle over it the salt, make a well in the centre and pour in the yeast, remaining water, butter, and eggs if used, scraping and incorporating the flour that sticks to the sides of the bowl.

3. Knead for about 10 minutes until dough is smooth and elastic and does not stick to the hands. Add more warm water if dough feels stiff. pour half the olive oil into one palm and shape dough into a ball, turning to call all sides.

4. Transfer the dough to a clean bowl, add remaining oil and turn dough again. Cover bowl with a plastic sheet, wrap well, and set aside in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in bulk, or about 2 hours.

5. Punch the dough down, divide into 20 to 25 balls. Have some trays ready, lightly dusted with flour, on which to place the balls of dough, and keep them well wrapped until ready to roll out. large plastic sheets, tucked in on all sides, are best.

6. Pick up the fist ball, flatten it with the hands or a rolling pin into a circle about 6 inches / 15 cm in diameter. Use the reserved flour for rolling the circles of dough. Sprinkle both sides with flour and continue with remaining balls, stack the circles in six or eight piles.

7. Remove oven shelving, heat oven to 500 degrees F. Broiler pan should be at closet level to flame/elements. Have on hand a standard size rolling pin, a long thin dowl about 24 inches/60 cm in length, a large spatula and a fork.

8. Sprinkle flour on counter surface, take the first circle of dough and with the rolling pin roll it to the size of a large pie crust or about 15 inches / 37.5cm in diameter, turning dough often to obtain a desired, evenly rounded circle.

9. P ric k the dough all over with the fork to prevent large bubbles from forming during baking. Drape circle over the long dowel and place on the oven floor. This will bake in about 90 seconds! Open the oven door and check it once while baking. If any large bubbles form, break them with the end of the dowl. Use the long spatula to pick up the bread and place under the broiler for another 90 seconds. Lower oven heat to 450 degrees if bread is baking faster than 3 minutes.

10. Keep breads in a cool place. Bread will keep for months and can be eatern dry or sprinkled with water. Hold the bread under running water on both sides, let drain, then break into 2 or 3 pieces and pile on a plate. Delicious with cheese, olives or appetisers (hummus, baba ghanoush, taramasalata).

Yield: 20 to 25 flat breads, about 15 inches / 37.5cm in diameter.

Note:
1] If too much flour is used in opening the dough circles, the flour will scorch when placed on the hot oven flour, so use the flour sparingly.
2] If the oven bakes unevenly, turn the bread once north to south during baking and broiling steps.

Variation:

To make Armenian lavash, bake the last few breads with the oven door open. Bake the bread until it is a light brown on the bottom, turn over and bake until other side is browned. Do not close oven door during baking or the result will be a soft bread

Copied from "Armenian Cooking Today" by Alice Antreassian

Last edited by Zana; July 28, 2009 at 02:49 PM. Reason: adding source
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Old July 28, 2009   #25
Zana
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Nah....I did these last week for a BBQ party for my Kiwanis Club last Tuesday. I catered it. LOL Think I cooked or prepped for about 4 days. and Crashed the day afterwards! LOL

And you're welcome.
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Old August 11, 2009   #26
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Default 5 minute or No-Knead baked in gas grill

This turned out to be one the best loaves of bread I've ever baked. I put the stone on a metal colander to raise it so it wouldn't be so close to the flames.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg First Bread Baked on Grill 8-11-09.jpg (51.0 KB, 83 views)
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Old August 11, 2009   #27
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I'm not sure but I think I can smell that.
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Old August 12, 2009   #28
Penny
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Yummy, homemade bread!
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Old September 23, 2009   #29
VGary
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Default Cat Head Biscuits and Good Memories

Sometimes I have reflective moments remembering the past and the good things which came my way. We grew up with less than others but always had good food because Mama and Grandma spent much of the summer canning tomatoes, making Peach Jam. Blackberry Jam, Strawberry Jam, Apple Jelly, Drying fruit, making pickles and Sauerkraut. But most of all I loved the Cat Head Biscuits Mama and Grandma use to make for us when we were children. You can have these at any meal. We use to have them for a Supper Meal sometimes with Cream Gravy and a few other things like scrambled eggs, Cold Biscuits left over made good snack or sandwiches. Onion and mustard on a cold biscuit for me was a real treat after school. smile


Cat Head Biscuits
2 ½ cups of plain flower
¾ tea spoon of Salt
½ Teaspoon Baking Soda
1 Teaspoon Double acting Baking Powder
1 cup of Buttermilk
4 ½ Tablespoon of Shortening or unsalted butter


Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit


Mix the flour, salt, soda, and baking powder together in a medium size mixing bowl.
Add the shortening or butter a piece at a time, then mix it into the dry mixture thoroughly with a fork or two butter knives slicing in a scissor fashion. The finished mixture should have the consistency of course-ground cornmeal..


WHAT YOU WANT TO DO IS NOT MIX TOO MUCH
Make a well in the center of the dry mixture and add all of the milk. Using a spoon, stir the mixture. Pay special attention to scraping the edges of the bowl so that the dry flour there has a chance to get wet. You only want to stir until the milk is incorporated into the dry mix and there are no large areas of powdery flour remaining. Don't over-mix here. The dough after mixing should be lumpy, sticky in places, and a bit shaggy in the driest areas. Using your hands, leave the dough in the bowl and carefully knead it about three times. Just lift it out as best you can, fold it in half, then press it down. You may want to sprinkle some flour over it to keep your hands from getting coated. It does get sticky!


Cat Head Biscuits are large--about the size of a cat's head. Pinch off a ball of dough about 2 1/2 inches across and pat it into a thick patty. Put the shaped biscuits spaced into a baking sheet or cookie sheet.. Bake for 15 minutes or until the tops of the biscuits are a light golden brown.
We had these buttered with Jams and Jellies, Apple Butter, Mama and Grandma would make each summer. We usually had a good supply of Sorghum Molasses. My favorite and always has been was Blackberry Jam/Jelly. I keep it in the Fridge all the time to bring back good memories of the “berry” patch. When I don’t have biscuits I have Peanut Butter and Blackberry on Crackers. And, yes I do have a slice of onion on a cold biscuit from time to time. smile
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Old September 23, 2009   #30
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Earl, what internal temp do you shoot for?
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