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Old May 12, 2014   #121
Cole_Robbie
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Thanks for the help.

The EZ Flow works, but it's just very imprecise. They tell you to just look at the tank to see if it looks clear, and that is how you are supposed to know to add more fertilizer. I have no idea if it distributes the ferts evenly; it may. If I cared, I would get out my PPM meter and start testing each emitter, but that is too much work.

I have the one with the tall tank. There is something about the way the air moves inside it as it works that makes it fall over by itself, no matter how I leave it. I had to mount it to a bracket in the high tunnel. If I were carrying it around from garden to garden, I think I'd have to strap it to a cart. It's not really built to be mobile anyway. I leave it in one place and just hook the hose up when I need it. You have to have 2 wrenches to hook and unhook it. If you don't, it's tempting to use the little plastic hose barb as a lever, and I think it must break off easily. There is a sticker on it that says Do Not Stress Fitting!

I have not yet used a Dosmatic or Dosatron, but I am thinking they probably make the EZ Flow look like a toy by comparison. And they should - they are 3 to 4 times the price. I know myself and everyone else seems to rip on the EZ Flow, but overall I still think it is a good value for the money, and I would buy it again.
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Old May 12, 2014   #122
Worth1
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Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
Thanks for the help.

The EZ Flow works, but it's just very imprecise. They tell you to just look at the tank to see if it looks clear, and that is how you are supposed to know to add more fertilizer. I have no idea if it distributes the ferts evenly; it may. If I cared, I would get out my PPM meter and start testing each emitter, but that is too much work.

I have the one with the tall tank. There is something about the way the air moves inside it as it works that makes it fall over by itself, no matter how I leave it. I had to mount it to a bracket in the high tunnel. If I were carrying it around from garden to garden, I think I'd have to strap it to a cart. It's not really built to be mobile anyway. I leave it in one place and just hook the hose up when I need it. You have to have 2 wrenches to hook and unhook it. If you don't, it's tempting to use the little plastic hose barb as a lever, and I think it must break off easily. There is a sticker on it that says Do Not Stress Fitting!

I have not yet used a Dosmatic or Dosatron, but I am thinking they probably make the EZ Flow look like a toy by comparison. And they should - they are 3 to 4 times the price. I know myself and everyone else seems to rip on the EZ Flow, but overall I still think it is a good value for the money, and I would buy it again.
The lack of impreciseness is what I have read too.
One lady said it burned up her garden.

I'm just going to have to build one that works from my own design.
One that is absolutely is accurate.

Worth
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Old May 15, 2014   #123
bejustice
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Mazzei fertilizer injectors work great. Berry Hill Irrigation has them online $38.00. The complete assembly is 99.

They have a gauge adapter and gauge for around 5 bucks you can put at the end of tape, great tool for laying out systems, put one at the end of your highest line and lowest line.
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Old May 15, 2014   #124
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The lack of impreciseness is what I have read too.
One lady said it burned up her garden.

I'm just going to have to build one that works from my own design.
One that is absolutely is accurate.

Worth
This type of injector, EZ-FLO, is really only good if you are pushing a set amount of fertilizer out all at once on a larger area. They are NOT good if you are not going to push it all out at once. For a high tunnel of tomatoes, as an example, if you need to put out 15 lbs of calcium nitrate per week then you dump in 15lbs and let it run until it is all pushed out.

You can't rely on this type of injector to feed at a constant rate. It is more of a push it out and done. When doing it this way it works just fine.
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Old May 15, 2014   #125
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Mazzei fertilizer injectors work great. Berry Hill Irrigation has them online $38.00. The complete assembly is 99.

They have a gauge adapter and gauge for around 5 bucks you can put at the end of tape, great tool for laying out systems, put one at the end of your highest line and lowest line.
Mazzie's are fine if you have enough water pressure to run them. Most Mazzie's require a pressure drop of 10-15 PSI to make then work right. If you only have 45 or 50 PSI at the faucet and need to run water hundreds of feet to the field, well then they may not work well.

They also require a minimum amount of water flow to meter properly. They don't work well on small plots. They are great on large fields.

A cheaper injector, like a Chemilizer, will work great. They are essentially like a budget dosatron. It is a fixed 1:100 injector for about $200 at Nolt's Midwest Produce Supplies. It sucks a concentrated solution and injects it with virtually no loss in water pressure. It is a constant rate injection as well so there should be no burning unless you miscalculate on your concentrate.
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Old May 15, 2014   #126
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I would like to add something.
If anyone is using a sprinkler system, drip system or fertilizer injection system they need to know something.

For the first two you need at least a double check back flow preventer.
The last you need something better like a vacuum breaker of reduced pressure back flow preventer.

Those little cheap plastic check valves are junk and should never be used.
A good brass vacuum breaker at the faucet is much better and here where I live they are required.
Remember it is all our responsibility to protect our water supply.

Here is a link to why and where.
http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/i...ow-preventers/

Worth
For the first two you need at least a double check back flow preventer.
The last you need something better like a vacuum breaker of reduced pressure back flow preventer.

It depends on your system layout. A double check back flow preventer is an expensive device and usually only required when using a municipal water supply and injecting chemicals. A vacuum breaker directly after the faucet with a one way swing check valve is all that is really necessary when on a well. If your faucet is the highest point in the system then there is even less to worry about.

Municipalities need to worry about this stuff because most outside faucets are hooked directly to the main line that comes in to the house. If you are injecting chemicals and they suffer a sudden pressure drop the pressure/water in your system could allow for back syphoning to occur and draw chemicals into the municipal water supply.

On a well there is not usually a back syphoning problem to worry about. If the system is designed properly with air vent breakers at the high points then water should never cause a syphoning effect unless the whole system is under water from a flood or some such thing.

A lot of the "gear" that is sold is designed for businesses who are dealing with much nastier stuff than fertilizer.
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Old May 15, 2014   #127
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moon1234 View Post
For the first two you need at least a double check back flow preventer.
The last you need something better like a vacuum breaker of reduced pressure back flow preventer.

It depends on your system layout. A double check back flow preventer is an expensive device and usually only required when using a municipal water supply and injecting chemicals. A vacuum breaker directly after the faucet with a one way swing check valve is all that is really necessary when on a well. If your faucet is the highest point in the system then there is even less to worry about.

Municipalities need to worry about this stuff because most outside faucets are hooked directly to the main line that comes in to the house. If you are injecting chemicals and they suffer a sudden pressure drop the pressure/water in your system could allow for back syphoning to occur and draw chemicals into the municipal water supply.

On a well there is not usually a back syphoning problem to worry about. If the system is designed properly with air vent breakers at the high points then water should never cause a syphoning effect unless the whole system is under water from a flood or some such thing.

A lot of the "gear" that is sold is designed for businesses who are dealing with much nastier stuff than fertilizer.
You need to re think your statements not all of them are correct.
At least not in Texas and any other place I know.

That so called (gear) you mentioned is required by law here.

Worth
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Old May 15, 2014   #128
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Chemilzers work great too. If they are clicking when everything is off you have got a leak somewhere, they will remind you. You can cart mount them with a bucket underneath, good rig. They would work great on a Gator with a wand on a purple pipe golf corse. Take anything that will hold water and freeze in for the winter.
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Old September 21, 2014   #129
horticultor
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Default header line connectors?

I got a drip irrigation kit just to get the hang of how to do it. Now I need more 3/4" header tubing (not layflat). I know where to get it. But, I want to connect the new line to the 100' I got originally to make a continuous run. Don't see on the net any connectors for that purpose, but it seems there would have to be such a thing. Guidance, anyone?
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Old September 21, 2014   #130
Cole_Robbie
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You need a 3/4" insert coupling and two hose clamps:

http://www.menards.com/main/plumbing...31-c-13795.htm

If you go to Home Depot/Lowes or any retail store, all the gray plastic fittings will be together. Farm supply stores sell them, too.
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Old September 22, 2014   #131
Heritage
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I you only have one connection (or a few) then Cole's solution is good. If you have many splices, a compression connection would be faster and cheaper. Just make sure your hose O.D. is correct:
3/4 inch compression fitting
Also, if you have problem hands (arthritis, etc), I would go with Cole's solution since the compression fittings take some wrangling to insert.

Steve
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Old September 23, 2014   #132
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Many thanks to both of you! Went with Cole Robbie this time, but your option is filed for future reference, Heritage!
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Old September 25, 2014   #133
Keger
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I have been looking at a set up like this as well, but cant pull the trigger. I see there is an out fit that sells the tape combined with plastic mulch. Flora - Flo. Looks interesting..
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Old September 25, 2014   #134
Cole_Robbie
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Drip & plastic are geared toward larger-scale growers. The plastic is meant to be laid by a mulcher-layer & bed-maker pulled behind a tractor. Short lengths can be laid by hand just fine; it's just a lot of work.

The initial outlay will seem like a lot of money. But for a typical backyard gardener, a roll of plastic and a roll of drip tape will be a lifetime supply and then some. You can split it with several friends and still have enough.
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Old April 20, 2016   #135
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I added three rows outside the high tunnel and wanted to connect them to my drip system. It's about eight feet from the end of one row to the start of another. If I irrigate that ground, it wastes water and makes the weeds grow too fast. So I bridged the gap with a piece of 1/2" pvc pipe. There's a drip tape fitting that is Tape Lock to PVC. I also plumbed a valve in it.






I buried the pipe after I took the pic. As long as the sun stays off of it, the pvc should last nearly forever.
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