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Old September 8, 2019   #1
Rajun Gardener
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Default Nectarines from seed

This was too easy or maybe I just got lucky. Do I need two trees for pollination?

I bought some nectarines from the store and they were juicy so I decided to plant a seed just for kicks. I cracked the pit open and pulled the seed out, put it in a damp paper towel and stuck it in the fridge for 2 weeks. When I checked it roots were already growing so I pulled it out and left it on top the fridge for a week. I transplanted it yesterday and set it under the carport to get a few hours a day of dappled sun.


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Old September 8, 2019   #2
Worth1
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You wont need a pollinator but a peach and a nectarine are the same species.
You might get a peach or you might get a nectarine and very probable you will get inferior fruit.
It is a gene mutation that causes the hair or no hair on them.

Far better off buying a grafted tree.
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Old September 8, 2019   #3
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What fun is there in buying a tree? 3 years or so from now and we should know it's gender!
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Old September 8, 2019   #4
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A dear friend of mine grew apricots rom seed in fruit he had enjoyed. They produced well for years until a storm tore them up badly. He did find out that he had to net the trees or the birds got more than he did!
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Old September 8, 2019   #5
arnorrian
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Planting seeds of a fruit that is normaly grafted is a big gamble. Usually you get plants with less nice fruits, and often no fruits at all.
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Old September 8, 2019   #6
Salsacharley
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I think it is fun as anything to grow stuff from seeds that were extracted from food purchased. So what if the nectarines aren't first class. The fun is the miracle of making it happen!
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Old September 8, 2019   #7
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Nectarines and Peaches generally come true to type from seed as they are self compatible, unlike apples which are outcrossers. Have done it before with very good results. Have several seedlings in garden now.
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Old September 8, 2019   #8
Worth1
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My comments are from my perspective and my age.
I simply don't have the time or area to protect for experiments that take a few years to see if the results are good or bad.

It is also nice to know that they can come back true from seed.
This is not what I read on a university site.
Nor does it mean I take everything that the university write ups say as the absolute truth.
I just dont have the time to test it.
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Old September 8, 2019   #9
arnorrian
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There is also rootstock to think abou. Even if graft comes true, rootstock is there for a reason.
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Old September 8, 2019   #10
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Agree with you arnorrian, rootstocks are breed for a reason, be it disease resistance, drought tolerance or something else. Not always necessary but can be the difference between a trees survival or not. I know from first hand experience, my parents place has near perfectly draining top soil over 8 feet deep and they have had seedling nectarines survive for twenty plus years on their own roots. Here where I am on silt, I need to build up beds at least 30 cm to have any hope, own roots or grafted


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Originally Posted by arnorrian View Post
There is also rootstock to think abou. Even if graft comes true, rootstock is there for a reason.

Worth, the only peach that I am aware of that needs a pollinator is JH Hale, all the others are self compatible and would generally be block planted so there is no other genetics to cross with to form hybrids and induce variability. Think block planted corn of one variety as against changing the variety every second row to ensure pollination as happens with apples, pears etc.

Understand concerns re University comments, but often these are tied back to funding sources, sometimes truer information can come from talking to those that grow them.
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Old September 10, 2019   #11
meganp
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Here's a blood peach that I grew from a stone that is both self compatible and consistently grows true from seed. It only took three years to blossom but is in an exposed position so can get caught by late frosts, snow or wind. Photo is from last year, taken late September. Is in bud now but not opened yet. I have two other peaches at the community garden, a white peach and a free stone orange fleshed peach all grown from stones so if you are patient, definitely worth the effort.
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Old September 10, 2019   #12
Worth1
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The people that write these papers about growing peaches and other fruit from seeds not being good.
Must be the same type of people that say heirloom tomatoes aren't worth it and you should never try to sharpen your own knife.
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Old September 10, 2019   #13
meganp
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The first photo is a fruit from the community garden tree grown from another peach stone. The other to are of a cling stone peach that is my absolute favourite peach since childhood. It's called Golden Queen and is delicious eating fresh and preserves well, makes great chutney, an all rounder. Has quite a firm yet juicy flesh. Luckily i have several friends growing them so am usually given more than i need but have still planted several stones.
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Old September 10, 2019   #14
PhilaGardener
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Wow, meganp , looks like those trees are doing well for you! Glad that blood peach is thriving again!
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Old September 10, 2019   #15
meganp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilaGardener View Post
Wow, meganp , looks like those trees are doing well for you! Glad that blood peach is thriving again!
Thanks, it is very hardy and produces lovely fruit.
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