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Old March 2, 2015   #16
MrBig46
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I had not been long able to grow the seedlings of kohlrabi through the window of apartment.
This year I used a method of Fusion Power and I am satisfied so far.
Pic.1- germinating plants (already backfilled)
Pic.2- seedlings transplanted into pots
Thank you. Vladimír
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Old March 2, 2015   #17
Tracydr
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For those unable to grow broccoli well, try Gailan/Kailan. Tastes just like broccoli but you use the stems/leaves.
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Old March 2, 2015   #18
jmsieglaff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusion_power View Post
not quite. The holes have to be big enough for the cotyledons to push up and out of the hole. Push your finger down into each hole and round it out a bit to ensure there is room. The hole should be about 3/4 inch diameter and should not have any bits of seed mix that could block the cotyledons.
Done. Thanks for the feedback!
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Old March 5, 2015   #19
jmsieglaff
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First phase is progressing nicely. I'll be pinching the holes in a couple days I reckon. Also trying this with kale.
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Old March 5, 2015   #20
jmsieglaff
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One more picture.
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Old March 5, 2015   #21
Fusion_power
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Isn't it nice how pretty the plants look growing up out of their holes!

My plants are nearly ready for the garden. I'll be hardening them off next week.
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Old March 6, 2015   #22
Gwendolyn
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Quote:
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It is said that nothing fertilizes a garden more than the footsteps of the gardener.

Lots of gardeners start seed about this time to have cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower plants for spring planting. I've started several thousand seed over the years and have found a few methods that are significantly better than others.

If you start brassicas in seed trays, most of the time, the seed will be planted 3/8 of an inch or so deep in the soil. The plant will get about 3 inches tall and have 3 or 4 leaves within a few weeks, then the weak stem will let the top of the plant fall over against the soil. This does not really harm the seedling, but it does suppress growth a bit and it makes messy plants to set out. I tried several methods of strengthening the stems with little success. You can put a fan on the plants which will do wonders for strengthening the stems, but it also dries them out very fast which can cause problems at temperatures above 70 degrees. I tried various methods of half-filling the seed tray with mix and then filling the tray up after the plant was a few inches tall. This works, but causes problems because seed start mix has to be added over the top where it tends to accumulate on the leaves. The amount of work involved simply can't be justified for anything more than a few dozen seedlings.

Then a few years ago, I tried something that I thought might help and found a new method of growing brassicas that produces strong stems and very healthy plants. I start with a standard 11" X 22" nursery tray with a 1204 cell pack (48 cells). Fill the tray with very moist seed start mix such as Promix BX. Use a rounded off stick to poke holes 3/4 inch diameter down all the way to the bottom of each cell. Drop in a single seed and if the seed is viable it will germinate within 3 days. The plantlet starts by growing roots into the small amount of soil at the bottom of the cell tray, the top gradually grows upward until it is above the top of the soil mix in the tray. When the growing tip is above the soil, I pinch the soil together on the stem of each plant. This can be done very quickly. The soil then provides extra support just below the expanding leaves. As the plant grows, roots will form all along the covered part of the stem which significantly improves the root system. I put a fan on the plants at that point to keep the stems sturdy until the plants are ready to go in the ground.

Give this tip a try, you will love the results!
wow! I was just wondering what I did wrong, nothing I see, just need to try this method on the brassicas! Thanks! I plant my tomatoes like that, dont know why is didnt think to try with my other vegs! Happy Gardening!
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Old March 10, 2015   #23
b54red
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusion_power View Post
It is said that nothing fertilizes a garden more than the footsteps of the gardener.

Lots of gardeners start seed about this time to have cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower plants for spring planting. I've started several thousand seed over the years and have found a few methods that are significantly better than others.

If you start brassicas in seed trays, most of the time, the seed will be planted 3/8 of an inch or so deep in the soil. The plant will get about 3 inches tall and have 3 or 4 leaves within a few weeks, then the weak stem will let the top of the plant fall over against the soil. This does not really harm the seedling, but it does suppress growth a bit and it makes messy plants to set out. I tried several methods of strengthening the stems with little success. You can put a fan on the plants which will do wonders for strengthening the stems, but it also dries them out very fast which can cause problems at temperatures above 70 degrees. I tried various methods of half-filling the seed tray with mix and then filling the tray up after the plant was a few inches tall. This works, but causes problems because seed start mix has to be added over the top where it tends to accumulate on the leaves. The amount of work involved simply can't be justified for anything more than a few dozen seedlings.

Then a few years ago, I tried something that I thought might help and found a new method of growing brassicas that produces strong stems and very healthy plants. I start with a standard 11" X 22" nursery tray with a 1204 cell pack (48 cells). Fill the tray with very moist seed start mix such as Promix BX. Use a rounded off stick to poke holes 3/4 inch diameter down all the way to the bottom of each cell. Drop in a single seed and if the seed is viable it will germinate within 3 days. The plantlet starts by growing roots into the small amount of soil at the bottom of the cell tray, the top gradually grows upward until it is above the top of the soil mix in the tray. When the growing tip is above the soil, I pinch the soil together on the stem of each plant. This can be done very quickly. The soil then provides extra support just below the expanding leaves. As the plant grows, roots will form all along the covered part of the stem which significantly improves the root system. I put a fan on the plants at that point to keep the stems sturdy until the plants are ready to go in the ground.

Give this tip a try, you will love the results!

Great idea! Especially for someone starting a lot of plants. I have always potted mine up when they get large enough so I plant them deeper during this step and have nice stout healthy plants by the time to plant out comes. Of course the squirrels usually destroy half of them or more before they can produce but that is another matter.

I have grown a lot of varieties of Broccoli and recently found the most successful one for down here in Colorado Crown. I still grow some Bonanza each year also but the heads are not as large or as tight but it does produce earlier. One of the biggest advantages of Colorado Crown is the ability of the heads to remain tight for much longer and the side shoots are the largest I have ever grown.

Bill
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Old March 10, 2015   #24
clkeiper
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The cooler you can grow the cole crops the less likely they are to getting leggy, too. Don't start them on heat mats, either.
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Old March 10, 2015   #25
jmsieglaff
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And after 7 days the process is complete. Looks like it will also work just fine for my kale as well.
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Old March 18, 2015   #26
jhp
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Looks good. Fusion power, do you put any mix over the seed, or just drop it in the hole?

Thanks,
Jen
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Old March 18, 2015   #27
jmsieglaff
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Jen I read the directions as dropping it right in and that's what I did. They were germinating by day 2 and were to the top of the holes by day 5 or 6 and were pinched closed 7 days after sowing.
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Old March 18, 2015   #28
Fusion_power
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As JMS says, don't cover the seed, just drop them in the hole and keep moisture levels high.
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Old March 19, 2015   #29
jhp
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Sounds good. I may give that a try. Thanks for posting this.

Jen
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Old March 20, 2015   #30
crazyoldgooseman
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This is great info! I have always had this issue.. leggy seedlings that fall over grow all crooked and crazy. Thanks fusion
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