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Old March 5, 2019   #1
loeb
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Default Searching for easy skinning tomato..

Few years ago I have seen seeds of one kind of tomato - description was it was old canning variety, that was very easy to peel, because the ripe fruit had thick skin that cracked and peeled off just from squeezing it harder. Unfortunately I cant remember the name:/ It was one of online tomato seed stores from US as far as I can remember.. Then I had a looong break from gardening :/ Now I can plant some toms again and I started thinking about finding the interesting ones I cn remember.. Fruit was round, red and not very big. I remember whole picture but can't remember the name, that is the problem in thinking with pictures..:/ Would someone help me with finding this?
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Old March 5, 2019   #2
Tormato
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Bonny Best?
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Old March 5, 2019   #3
sic transit gloria
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What shape was the tomato? Flattened globe, heart, plum?

As for peeling, when we can we just bring some water up to a simmer and drop the tomatoes in for a short while, fish them out, and the skins will come off quite easily.

If you're not canning, it's a little trickier. I'm a peeler; that is, I peel all tomatoes for fresh eating. My parents are peelers, my dad's family are peelers, so I became a peeler. Heirloom tomatoes tend to have thinner skins than hybrids, and I've found this can make peeling more difficult. There are definitely quite a few heirloom varieties that will peel nicely, though. There also exists a tomato peeler, which looks somewhat like a potato peeler. Someone gave me one, knowing I am a peeler, and it works ok, but I find it tends to take off the very outer layer of tomato, along with the peel, so it's a little aggressive for my taste.

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Old March 5, 2019   #4
loeb
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I guess I'm a peeler too.. I am eating cherries with skin, sometimes fresh ones with thin skin too, but for a salad or cooking I just have to peel them..

Thank you for Bonny Best suggestion. Its not the one, but I guess I will stay with hot water treatment or I will remember more.
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Old March 5, 2019   #5
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Ace 55?

Marglobe?

Rutgers?



I'm listing the few varieties found from an internet search of "best peeling" tomatoes
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Old March 5, 2019   #6
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I would add in Bradley and/or some color of Ponderosa. For a thicker skin, I'd be inclined to agree with Rutgers. For a thinner skin, I might lean toward Bradley - both of which are good canning tomatoes - one red (Rutgers) and one pink (Bradley). However, if you are located in Poland, then the names might be unknown to us here in North American.
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Old March 6, 2019   #7
Gardeneer
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I normally don,t peel tomatoes for fresh eating , salad, sandwich.
Jut for cooking, sauce making, canning i do it, simply by dropping them into boiling water for 15 to 20 secons, then taking them out puting in cold running tap water.
This way i have not seen any difference in peeling.
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Old March 6, 2019   #8
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The longer types tend to be easier to peel. Usually the most attachment is on the shoulders, so less shoulders makes for easier peeling.
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Old March 6, 2019   #9
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What's that one Campbell's grew?
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Old March 6, 2019   #10
brownrexx
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Rutgers 250 I think.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #11
loeb
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OK I've got some Rutgers seeds, thank you for the advices
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