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New to growing your own tomatoes? This is the forum to learn the successful techniques used by seasoned tomato growers. Questions are welcome, too.

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Old December 25, 2018   #31
Cole_Robbie
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Originally Posted by PlainJane View Post
So you don’t bother with bottom heat for things like peppers?
Nope. They just need heat. It can come from anywhere. My peppers usually germinate quite quickly.
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Old December 25, 2018   #32
PaulF
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The ambient temperature in my germinating basement does not get above 70 and my lighting system will not increase the temps more than a couple of degrees. My peppers do better when the soil temperature is between 80 and 85. I get germination but not so fast or healthy until the 80 degree temp. I am not sure my lighting system will change from the old fashioned fluorescents...but maybe.
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Old December 25, 2018   #33
Worth1
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Also just because the air temperature in a room is something doesn't mean everything in the room is the same.
You would think it is but it isn't.
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Old December 25, 2018   #34
loulac
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I'm perfectly aware the adviser is not the payer but I would hate spoiling a whole batch of seeds.
I use several heating mats, heating cables coupled to a thermostat.
I suggest the following links about temperature. Personnally I aim at a germination of most seeds in 3 - 4 days, which means the highest recommended temperature. I sometimes cool down a bit at night.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...927#post542927

http://tomclothier.hort.net/page11.html

All the best
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Old December 25, 2018   #35
PlainJane
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Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
Nope. They just need heat. It can come from anywhere. My peppers usually germinate quite quickly.
Interesting! Thanks ...
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Old December 25, 2018   #36
PlainJane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loulac View Post
I'm perfectly aware the adviser is not the payer but I would hate spoiling a whole batch of seeds.
I use several heating mats, heating cables coupled to a thermostat.
I suggest the following links about temperature. Personnally I aim at a germination of most seeds in 3 - 4 days, which means the highest recommended temperature. I sometimes cool down a bit at night.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...927#post542927

http://tomclothier.hort.net/page11.html

All the best
Loulac
Love the charts, thank you.
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Old December 25, 2018   #37
PlainJane
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Also just because the air temperature in a room is something doesn't mean everything in the room is the same.
You would think it is but it isn't.
Yes, I’m sure that room has fluctuations, given that it shares one wall with the unheated garage and has a couple of windows opposite. Right now we use t as a basement, this being Florida. Between the little ceramic heater and a fan I think I can even out the ambient temperature, and we’re only talking for 2 months anyway. By March we’re usually past any really cold weather.
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Old December 25, 2018   #38
PlainJane
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Originally Posted by PaulF View Post
The ambient temperature in my germinating basement does not get above 70 and my lighting system will not increase the temps more than a couple of degrees. My peppers do better when the soil temperature is between 80 and 85. I get germination but not so fast or healthy until the 80 degree temp. I am not sure my lighting system will change from the old fashioned fluorescents...but maybe.
My lights will be led so they won’t give off much in the way of heat. I still can’t get used to not having a basement but ... oh well. On the other hand I can grow something 12 months a year. Thanks for the feedback!
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Old December 25, 2018   #39
rhines81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loulac View Post
I'm perfectly aware the adviser is not the payer but I would hate spoiling a whole batch of seeds.
I use several heating mats, heating cables coupled to a thermostat.
I suggest the following links about temperature. Personnally I aim at a germination of most seeds in 3 - 4 days, which means the highest recommended temperature. I sometimes cool down a bit at night.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...927#post542927

http://tomclothier.hort.net/page11.html

All the best
Loulac
I've seen this chart before. It has some merit, but it is missing the test method, growing media type and moisture content, number of samples per test and the number of times the testing was repeated under the same conditions.
It does point out that room temperature is more than fine for most seed types including tomatoes and peppers, but I would like to see more information regarding the test data.
If one is starting in a soil media, it would also be interesting to see a chart showing temperature/humidity vs. mold growth rates as well. After about 2 weeks at ~85F, I do recall seeing some mold development in a humid dome environment. How does mold affect germination, I don't know, but it seemed less likely for germination once mold set in.
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Old December 26, 2018   #40
loulac
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I've seen this chart before. It has some merit, but it is missing the test method, growing media type and moisture content, number of samples per test and the number of times the testing was repeated under the same conditions.


I just tried to help PlainJane by giving her plain information. Of course, one can go much deeper, U.S. universities have done valuable research on the subject, but their publications would be off-topic in this thread.


Let me give additional simple information :
http://sacmg.ucanr.edu/files/164220.pdf
SOIL TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS FOR VEGETABLE SEED GERMINATION
University of California . Nice charts

http://www.kdcomm.net/~tomato/Tomato/start.html :
“One can start your tomatoes beginning 6-8 weeks before setting them out in just about any type of container that can provide drainage. Just make sure to start with good seed and a sterile soil mix. I like to use a half-peat moss, half-vermiculite mix. Using a sterile mix will reduce the potential for soil borne disease problems.
Pre-moisten the mix slightly before planting. Plant seed about 1/4" (7mm) deep, cover with soil and water.
Seed should emerge in about 3-5 days at a temperature of 75-80F/24-27C degrees (min 50F/10C max 95F/35C). Optimum temperatures for growth are 65-80F/18-27C days and 60-65F/16-18C nights. During germination, place them on the top of a refrigerator near the back to act as a heating source. Wait till after the seeds have germinated to put them in light as some genotypes (or varieties) require dark for germination to occur.”
You will notice that soil temperature, not air temperature should be taken into account. Of course, you can bury a thermometer into the soil but burying the sensor of a thermostat will remain the safest way to control the heat”.

I suggest :
https://www.amazon.com/bayite-Fahren...TE4A1M8EFZK9EQ
Bayite AC 110V Fahrenheit Digital Temperature Controller 10A 1 Relay with Sensor Price: $17.90
The model was sold for years by Willhi. I’ve got some, they have been working perfectly for years.
Directions for use on youtube :
How to set up Willhi Wh 7016 temperature controller installation. DIY ...


All the best
Loulac
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Old December 26, 2018   #41
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I put my seeds on the guest bed and turned the electric blanket on low..... redneck ,I know, but it worked. When sprouted, put them under grow lights.

Works great so long as your guests don't mind!
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Old December 26, 2018   #42
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Red Neck would be keeping them next to a nursing Blue tick hound dog on the guest bed.

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Old December 26, 2018   #43
roper2008
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I use Jumpstart heating mats. No thermostat, but it works for me. Doesn't overcook
my seeds. I have some now germinating on it.
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Old December 26, 2018   #44
Greatgardens
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I use several heat mats. One is a real cheapie that is about 20 watts that I use under a 10 x 20 tray for starting seeds. I've had it about 10 years, and it cost about $16 when I bought it. No thermostat, so I regulate the temperature by having the clear lid partially open.


I have two others that are the heavy rubber type that I use in the garage for when the plants are too big for my indoor shelf. About 60 watts each with plugin thermostat. Those cost around $40 - $50, but they are much better quality.

Some new catalogs show them going north of $100 each!!! Ouch!

Last edited by Greatgardens; December 26, 2018 at 12:28 PM.
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Old December 26, 2018   #45
PlainJane
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I use several heat mats. One is a real cheapie that is about 20 watts that I use under a 10 x 20 tray for starting seeds. I've had it about 10 years, and it cost about $16 when I bought it. No thermostat, so I regulate the temperature by having the clear lid partially open.


I have two others that are the heavy rubber type that I use in the garage for when the plants are too big for my indoor shelf. About 60 watts each with plugin thermostat. Those cost around $40 - $50, but they are much better quality.

Some new catalogs show them going north of $100 each!!! Ouch!
I know! This is why I’m moving slowly in regards to the heat pad. If I have too I’ll start the peppers and tomatoes on top of the fridge.
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