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Old December 29, 2016   #1
jmsieglaff
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Default Crossing with Orange Tomatoes

If one were to cross a pink tomato with an orange tomato, using one with the B (beta) gene(e.g., Jaune Flamme), would it be better to use the pink or orange as the female? My thought is if B is expressed in the F1, then using the pink as the female would be best since I'd know the cross took. If another orange variety is used that say has t (tangerine), then the orange would be best, again knowing that the cross took (F1 would be red or pink, depending on orange skin color).
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Old December 31, 2016   #2
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I think I found the answer to my question and it is clearly very complex.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=33232

Especially the later pages of the thread.
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Old January 4, 2017   #3
Darren Abbey
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Originally Posted by jmsieglaff View Post
If one were to cross a pink tomato with an orange tomato, using one with the B (beta) gene(e.g., Jaune Flamme), would it be better to use the pink or orange as the female? My thought is if B is expressed in the F1, then using the pink as the female would be best since I'd know the cross took. If another orange variety is used that say has t (tangerine), then the orange would be best, again knowing that the cross took (F1 would be red or pink, depending on orange skin color).
Orange (Beta type) crossed with pink:
  • Orange trait requires dominant red (over yellow).
  • RRBBYY (orange) x RRbbyy (pink) -> BbYy (Orange w/ yellow skin)
Orange (tangerine type) crossed with pink:
  • Orange trait also requires dominant red (over yellow).
  • RRttYY (orange) x RRTTyy (pink) -> RRTtYy (red w/ yellow skin)
In each case, the F1 will appear different than either parent. Using the pink as female in the first case would result in a more obvious difference, while using the orange as the parent in the second case would be more obvious.
----

A general discussion of color genes: http://the-biologist-is-in.blogspot....-tomatoes.html
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Last edited by Darren Abbey; January 4, 2017 at 01:16 AM.
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Old January 4, 2017   #4
KarenO
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Orange (Beta type) crossed with pink:
  • Orange trait requires dominant red (over yellow).
  • RRBBYY (orange) x RRbbyy (pink) -> BbYy (Orange w/ yellow skin)
Orange (tangerine type) crossed with pink:
  • Orange trait also requires dominant red (over yellow).
  • RRttYY (orange) x RRTTyy (pink) -> RRTtYy (red w/ yellow skin)
In each case, the F1 will appear different than either parent. Using the pink as female in the first case would result in a more obvious difference, while using the orange as the parent in the second case would be more obvious.
----

A general discussion of color genes: http://the-biologist-is-in.blogspot....-tomatoes.html
Darren,
This is a great article, easy to understand for the layperson thank you for posting it.
I am interested in the opaque red high lycopene skin trait. A clear epidermis pink skinned yellow cherry appeared in a potato leaf F2 selection of one of my crosses. Marsha is growing out the F3 and the coloration has come through in the F3 as well. It looks like the photo in the article except once ripe the skin on our tomato is a bright dark apricot pink.
I initially thought it was a bicolour as the color begins as s blush on the blossom end but does not extend into the interior. The blush continues to develop until the whole exterior becomes pink.
Would you look at the KARMA project thread and tell me if you think this is the explanation for the color of this cherry.
Thank you
KarenO
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Old January 4, 2017   #5
Darren Abbey
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This is a great article, easy to understand for the layperson thank you for posting it.
I post it from time to time when it seems appropriate. ;-)

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I am interested in the opaque red high lycopene skin trait. A clear epidermis pink skinned yellow cherry appeared in a potato leaf F2 selection of one of my crosses. Marsha is growing out the F3 and the coloration has come through in the F3 as well. It looks like the photo in the article except once ripe the skin on our tomato is a bright dark apricot pink.
This sort of trait seems to keep cropping up. It is outside the norm for what is published about tomato color genetics, which keeps making me find it interesting.

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I initially thought it was a bicolour as the color begins as s blush on the blossom end but does not extend into the interior. The blush continues to develop until the whole exterior becomes pink.
That sort of progressive color development reminds me of a trait I sometimes see in fruit of the variety "White Tomasol".

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Would you look at the KARMA project thread and tell me if you think this is the explanation for the color of this cherry.
I'll have a look and see what I can make of it.
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Old January 4, 2017   #6
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Would you look at the KARMA project thread and tell me if you think this is the explanation for the color of this cherry.
The fruit depicted at...
...definitely fits the pattern.

The conversations which led to that part of my blog post were referring to either extra lycopene in the very surface skin (normally yellow or clear) or enhanced lycopene in the tissue just below the skin as in your photos. It isn't clear if the two things are the same or different traits, but this sort of thing coming up independently in multiple genetic lines suggests there are several ways to get to the trait.
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Old January 4, 2017   #7
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I second Karen's sentiments--that is a very well written, carefully thought out article that really helped my understand of how color genetics work. Thank you for sharing. You should continue to sprinkle it around when the situation fits!

I've read through two articles related to orange genes, very interesting stuff!

Last edited by jmsieglaff; January 4, 2017 at 10:28 AM.
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Old January 4, 2017   #8
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Originally Posted by Darren Abbey View Post
The fruit depicted at...
...definitely fits the pattern.

The conversations which led to that part of my blog post were referring to either extra lycopene in the very surface skin (normally yellow or clear) or enhanced lycopene in the tissue just below the skin as in your photos. It isn't clear if the two things are the same or different traits, but this sort of thing coming up independently in multiple genetic lines suggests there are several ways to get to the trait.
Darren Abbey, i think i've been to your blog before. But do you have a link?
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Old January 4, 2017   #9
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Darren Abbey, i think i've been to your blog before. But do you have a link?
It's on the bottom of post 3.
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Old January 4, 2017   #10
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Thank you for your knowledge and for giving your informed opinion on the odd coloration of my tomato Darren. Much appreciated!

KarenO
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