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Old 1 Week Ago   #9571
DonDuck
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I like fresh, just from the garden; black eyed peas cooked with bacon. The fresh peas retain a toothiness and color I like. Canned peas have lost the texture I like and they always seem over cooked. Dried Black Eyed Peas always seem to go from dried and hard to over cooked with no" just right" stage between dried and over cooked.


Had I been a baker, I would have cooked black eyed peas down and removed the liquid leaving the pea residue dry. I've always thought black eyed pea flour would make a good filler in baked products. I can imagine it's use similar to mesquite beans.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9572
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I soak mine in the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours.
Then drain rinse and simmer for about an hour.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9573
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I keep reading how the Lodge cast iron loaf pan make a fantastic meatloaf.
We shall see.
New recipe I dreamed up too.
Ground chuck.
Ground mace.
Ground nutmeg.
Black pepper.
Corn starch as a binder.
Salt.
Ketchup.
Two eggs.
Cracker crumbs fine crushed and ran throu8gh a colander.
One large fine chopped onion.

In the oven at 300 F as we speak.
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Last edited by Worth1; 1 Week Ago at 08:15 PM. Reason: Corn starch as binder.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9574
Rajun Gardener
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Dang, am I the only one who used to make black-eyed pea foldover sandwiches. Heat up a can, smash them with a little sugar, spread on fresh bread and top with hot sauce. It's a taco like using refried beans but better flavor.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9575
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Never had a black eyed pea bread taco thingy.
Meatloaf ready with ketchup then jack cheese then ketchup.
The things I dont do for you guys and gals.
IMG_20191108_33283.jpg

IMG_20191108_48673.jpg
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9576
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i had some stock left over in the fridge form cooking a roast in the crock pot a few days ago, less than a quart worth so i stretched it with an equal amount of water to make beef stew. i bought a small amount of sirloin steak, less than a pound worth, cut it up, and coated with flour with a seasoning mix. i browned the meat, then added it to a pot with the stock, water, and a bay leaf. and simmered it for an hour. then i added chopped up carrots, celery, potatoes, onions, garlic, a parsnip, and turnip.
seasoned with salt, pepper, basil, oregano, savory, and a pinch of thyme, and cooked till
the veggies were tender.

my wife said you did it again. you knocked it out of the park.

there were no left overs.



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Old 1 Week Ago   #9577
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
Dang, am I the only one who used to make black-eyed pea foldover sandwiches. Heat up a can, smash them with a little sugar, spread on fresh bread and top with hot sauce. It's a taco like using refried beans but better flavor.

Never had that, nope. But do have a deep fondness for those tiny tender black eye peas with snaps in the can. I love the tiny ones a lot, but shelling them out by hand when they are that small is such a pain and I do not have a pea sheller.


Keith, that sounds like a tasty beef stew! What do parsnips taste like to you?
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9578
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The meatloaf turned out fantastic for my tastes.
The ketchup nutmeg and mace really hit the mark.
Best one yet and has cured my aversion towards meatloaf.
Sucked the slice down so fast last night I didn't taste it so I had to have one for breakfast.
That was the one that did it for me.
I have a kettle of small red kidney beans soaking at this time.
Did you know kidney beans contain more poison than the rest of the common beans.
It's true.
They tore my stomach up big time until I found out about this poison and started soaking them for many hours draining rinsing and cooking them for a very long time.
The skins are hard to digest to and was part of the problem.

I also read a crock pot doesn't get hot enough to neutralize this poison in beans.
Not unless they will get to the boiling point.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9579
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parsnips to me have a strong somewhat carrot like flavor, but different. i would put them
in the same like category as cilantro. you either like them or you don't. my father hated
them. he said his mother would cook them when he was young, and the smell would stink up the house.
i told my wife this story about parsnips early on, and we both decided to buy some,
and try them, and see what the big deal was. we found a simple recipe where you peeled them, sliced them and baked in butter. we both liked the result.
i frequently will add a parsnip or two when making a pot of stew or good hamburger soup.

maybe there is a parsnip gene like there is with cilantro? you either like them or hate them.




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Old 1 Week Ago   #9580
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Parsnips cooked in a sweet white wine reduction sounds good.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9581
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I have a pot of my moms world famous chili beans cooking on the stove.
I hated the things.
I wanted corn on the cob and fried chicken or maybe fried catfish.

But I am cooking them anyway and will eat them.
The reason I am doing it is to remind myself and others you dont always get what you want.
But you do get what you need.

The reason I hated the tings is because they had so much hot red pepper in them it would scald your tongue and melt tungsten.

My father would have sweat running off the top of his bald head but refused to complain.
Mostly out of fear of my hot headed Mediterranean mom.
This woman could go from Arctic cool to Sahara hot in a second and then back down again.

""""No, you can't always get what you want
You can't always get what you want
You can't always get what you want
But if you try sometime you find
You get what you need.""""

(Keith Richards and Mick Jagger)
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9582
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxkeith View Post
parsnips to me have a strong somewhat carrot like flavor, but different. i would put them
in the same like category as cilantro. you either like them or you don't. my father hated
them. he said his mother would cook them when he was young, and the smell would stink up the house.
i told my wife this story about parsnips early on, and we both decided to buy some,
and try them, and see what the big deal was. we found a simple recipe where you peeled them, sliced them and baked in butter. we both liked the result.
i frequently will add a parsnip or two when making a pot of stew or good hamburger soup.

maybe there is a parsnip gene like there is with cilantro? you either like them or hate them.




keith

Thank you, Keith. MissS also likes them and pretty much described them as you just did, too.



Other day at the grocery store, asked one of the produce guys what they tasted like; he didn't know, so called over another produce guy. Ended up with 4 produce people and myself, all tasting some raw parsnip slices, LOL!!!


Raw, they do smell and taste like a spicier carrot almost. I shall have to cook some and try them.



his is the same grocery store that will plug a melon for you still, a very good old fashioned produce department.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9583
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The best parsnips of all are the ones you left in the ground over winter. It sweetens them a lot, and doesn't harm them a bit. We had some big parsnip slices simmer-fried on the stove top and seasoned with lovage, very early spring... delightful.


You all are really doing it with the bean-spirations here! I'm not crazy about the gummed up beans from a can, although I did make myself refried beans one night with the can of romanos, served on nachos with cheese and fresh salsa with the bounty of late season tomatoes and peppers from the freezer. I've been looking for slow cooker recipes for chick peas and beans, because the canned stuff is just not appealing and I need something I can just use on short notice. Many's the meal of beans I missed because I don't plan ahead and before you know it, it's too late for today. And I don't have time to stand over beans on the stove. Not up for that.


I did make a bulk batch of lentils last week - half a bag/ about a lb of lentils ended up with 7 servings to freeze for quick meals. I love lentils seasoned with cumin and lots of fried onions. And went to the freezer for a second round before the week was over.


Yesterday I took a pork roast I got on special for less than $4 and cut it up into small pieces, and made a bulk pot of chinese style pork with matchstick carrots - seasoning freestyle with some cumin seed, garam masala, lots of garlic, ginger, generous sesame oil and some chipotle sauce. I really liked the effect of the cumin seed, which turns up as a little burst of flavor without being a hard thing that sticks in my teeth. The dish needs more vegetables but the idea is to add fresh vegs to the frozen basics. But I also thought black beans would be a great addition to it, so I found a recipe and they are simmering away in the slow cooker. Did not call for soaking, and they weren't a bit ready after 3 hours on high, so fingers crossed it turns out to be a good way to cook em.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9584
DonDuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
The meatloaf turned out fantastic for my tastes.
The ketchup nutmeg and mace really hit the mark.
Best one yet and has cured my aversion towards meatloaf.
Sucked the slice down so fast last night I didn't taste it so I had to have one for breakfast.
That was the one that did it for me.
I have a kettle of small red kidney beans soaking at this time.
Did you know kidney beans contain more poison than the rest of the common beans.
It's true.
They tore my stomach up big time until I found out about this poison and started soaking them for many hours draining rinsing and cooking them for a very long time.
The skins are hard to digest to and was part of the problem.

I also read a crock pot doesn't get hot enough to neutralize this poison in beans.
Not unless they will get to the boiling point.

In Texas, beans and rice are usually made with pinto beans. In louisiana, they are usually made with red kidney beans. I probably ate a thousand lbs of red kidney beans with the skins and never had a problem with them. Kidney beans make much better beans and rice than pinto beans.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9585
DonDuck
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"The best parsnips of all are the ones you left in the ground over winter. It sweetens them a lot, and doesn't harm them a bit. We had some big parsnip slices simmer-fried on the stove top and seasoned with lovage, very early spring... delightful."

In the first paragraph. You have already named two things I've never eaten. Parsnips and Lovage. In north Texas, we tend to eat carrots a lot, but I don't think I've ever seen parsnips for sale. I wonder why.

I was on a gardening forum in Great Britain and they grow and eat the heck out of parsnip. They cook parsnip with pot roasts and basically every where else we eat potatoes. They have parsnip growing competitions where they plant seed in the top of six foot long by six inch diameter pvc plastic tubes to see who can grow the longest parsnip. The longest I remember is about five feet long.

Last edited by DonDuck; 1 Week Ago at 10:58 PM.
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