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Old August 5, 2018   #1
GreenThumbGal_07
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Default Flowers loved by pollinators

I'm in the (cooler) east San Francisco Bay Area, and so have to select varieties with a proven ability to set fruit in lower temperatures.


I'd heard Santa Clara Canner (SCC) was a variety that liked heat. I wanted to try this one for the flavor, so went ahead. It's occupying a 7-gallon felt pot with Hungarian Italian Paste (HIP) (won't try this again as I understand SCC is a large plant that needs much room).



Both HIP and SCC were set out at the same time, and blossomed at about the same time, but so far it's only SCC that's been showing fruit set.



A few days ago I went out to water, and disturbed a large bumble bee. Was the bee visiting the flowers?


Today I went out and saw a tiny wasp which was engrossed in exploring a large SCC blossom.



I wonder -- do some tomato varieties have "tastier" blossoms more attractive to pollinators?



Looking forward to trying the SCC.


Nice article here:


http://www.teresagiovanzana.com/sant...canner-tomato/
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Old August 5, 2018   #2
Nan_PA_6b
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I've heard tell that bumblebees will pick and choose between different varieties.
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Old August 5, 2018   #3
Cole_Robbie
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Obviously you meant tomato flowers, but just as a side note, when I pick my sunflowers, they always have a lot of bumble bees on them. I hardly ever see a honey bee on them, but the bumble bees love them.
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Old August 5, 2018   #4
KarenO
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More pollen would make a flower more attractive to a bumblebee as that is what it is collecting when it visits a flower as opposed to nectar. Bumblebees ( and most other bees) do not make honey or live in hives only honeybees do.
I find that sometimes folks are surprised by that.

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Old August 6, 2018   #5
kurt
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From what I have read,it is the fluttering of the insects wings that do the majority of the pollination.Direct transfer contact of pollen does occur when they crawl about.I use a purple bleeding heart plant,bougainvillea,a blue sky vine for attractants that fly into the mangoes,lychees,bananas ,citrus etc.

https://www.south-florida-plant-guid...eart-vine.html

https://www.south-florida-plant-guide.com/sky-vine.html

The blue sky vine is a great attractant for the hummingbird population also,they zip around and their wings cause plenty of “flutter”if you will.
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Old August 6, 2018   #6
b54red
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Basil flowers draw more pollinators than anything else in my garden. It seems it is especially attractive to honey bees. I try to plant a few each year and just let them grow and grow. As soon as it gets good and hot they start flowering and I'm not sure when they stop.

Bill
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Old August 6, 2018   #7
zeuspaul
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You don't need pollinators for tomato flowers. Generally pollination takes place with a little wind. Everything needed for pollination is contained within the tomato flower. That is why cross pollination is not frequent with tomatoes.
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Old August 6, 2018   #8
GrowingCoastal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by b54red View Post
Basil flowers draw more pollinators than anything else in my garden. It seems it is especially attractive to honey bees. I try to plant a few each year and just let them grow and grow. As soon as it gets good and hot they start flowering and I'm not sure when they stop.

Bill
Good to know. I will now let my extra grow flowers.
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