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Old October 10, 2017   #46
KarenO
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The shape is still a bit variable, some with pointed blossom ends, some with dimples but the colour and gel-free characteristic has been consistent in all of them from the start.
Definitely better grown in my raised bed this year vs a pot for the F2. No blossom end rot at all grown in the ground, there was some last year when they were grown in pots.
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Old October 10, 2017   #47
KarenO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
Nice bonus from the store bought tomatoes. It's nice when an experiment turns out great. I have some f-3's from Compari to grow next season and some Compari crosses to grow this winter.
How were your F2's ? Are you trying to grow an OP version of Campari or looking for something different? Did you have a lot of variability in the F2?
KO
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Old October 10, 2017   #48
Rajun Gardener
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All F-2's were the same as the tomatoes I bought and tasted great. No oddballs so I'm not so sure that it's a hybrid but the seeds are expensive. Maybe the F-3's will show variance.

I crossed it with Rebel Yell to try to increase the size from a small salad type(2 oz) to a little bigger with a truss of 6-10 tomatoes. The other cross is with Siberian, again to increase size and give it cold weather tolerance. These are my first crosses so it's a fun project and I'm sure I'll learn along the way.
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Old October 10, 2017   #49
KarenO
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Sounds pretty stable if all the F2 are the same. you would expect the most variability in the F2. Good luck with your projects!
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Old October 10, 2017   #50
oakley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenO View Post
All the buzz seems to be about the Spanish and Italian long keeping tomatoes. I wonder if there are some genetics of those in these. Does anyone have a picture of some cut/interior views of those? They must also be dry inside with minimal gel in order to keep as long as they do without rotting.
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I was thinking this as well. About the inheritance and genetic link.

And oh my, I could use a bowl of those right now. I was hoping for
the same but deer got mine a couple nights ago. I should have
picked them green. Tomatoes, being climacteric, I've found,
will ripen without showing the breaker stage in color as it has
already started the process. Not all, just some, late in the season.

You have a good one to experiment with various heat methods.
Maybe cut in half and slow roast a few. Check at a half hour, taste,
then continue for a hour, taste. Again at two hours. They may not
need much heat at all to 'heat break' those cell walls.

Another test, I learned in Gubio, (GOO-bee-o), in Umbria, Italy,
is to grill or broil a slice of hearty bread like a Boule, just one
side, and while still very hot, (it is firm like a cheese grater), rub
a clove of garlic over it, then the tomato. Pinch of salt. Just that
bit of heat 'bloomed' the tomato flavor. It was a firm Roma type.
Hand held size.

I lived with a family for the month of September. ('84?) Harvested
grapes, made wine, probably a hundred lbs of small late harvest
tomatoes. I was too young to remember much, early 20's. But
some images are like yesterday...making mozzarella, slaughtering
the animals for meals, processing all those tomatoes, etc.
Soil dry as a bone, no rain or irrigation.

Seems to be the 'landrace' adaptable varieties over generations in
parts of Italy And Spain we keep hearing about. I have no
memory of stringing them to hang but did see that in Naples.

Makes sense that a commercial grower would use those traits
in their hybrid long keepers.
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Old October 10, 2017   #51
oakley
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This is fun. I think I've watched all SarahWeiner videoshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrGdyybzPVA. This one is about
the pomodorini del piennolo del Vesuvio. My German and Italian is good but
still good content without any language knowledge/study.
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Old October 10, 2017   #52
KarenO
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mine are quite a bit bigger than most of what I have seen as long keepers like these in the video which look quite small, not much bigger than a large cherry.
Cool video, I do not speak either language but it is interesting nonetheless. Beautiful place as well, I would love to visit one day (and bring home a pocketful of seeds...) of course
KO
Pic in my hand added for clearer size reference
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Last edited by KarenO; October 10, 2017 at 05:30 PM.
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Old October 10, 2017   #53
GrowingCoastal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
All F-2's were the same as the tomatoes I bought and tasted great. No oddballs so I'm not so sure that it's a hybrid but the seeds are expensive. Maybe the F-3's will show variance.

I crossed it with Rebel Yell to try to increase the size from a small salad type(2 oz) to a little bigger with a truss of 6-10 tomatoes. The other cross is with Siberian, again to increase size and give it cold weather tolerance. These are my first crosses so it's a fun project and I'm sure I'll learn along the way.

This year I grew out F3 of Campari and got determinate something else - two of them. They were ok. Not very productive. Taste was good. Very firm outer wall. Not worth growing again but maybe useful for firmness in a cross, IMHO.
(The f2's last year were also identical to the store bought parent.)
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Old October 10, 2017   #54
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Thanks for that info, I'll keep that in mind. Are you going another farther with it next year?
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Old October 10, 2017   #55
Gardeneer
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An accidental/volunteer grape tomato grew from my compost hole dump.
It is true to the tomatoes I bough from store.
Now it is growing second round after the July/August heat almost killed it and I neglected it too.
Now that it is loaded with fruits and flowers, I fertilize and water it. It has kinda multi flora fruiting habit too.
I will grow it next year to see what I'll get.
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Old October 10, 2017   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenO View Post
F’s Daughter, I haven’t made a sauce exclusively with these, they are excellent to thicken up a sauce of mixed tomatoes. I can try it with these last ones, they are so solid I think I may need to add a bit of water to get them cooking.
They are not acidic raw, definitely a cooking tomato not good as a slicer.

KarenO

Thank you for the feedback. They sound like a nice, dense paste. And we paste growers know better than to rate a paste on how it tastes raw!
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Old October 11, 2017   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajun Gardener View Post
Thanks for that info, I'll keep that in mind. Are you going another farther with it next year?
Nope. Not enough room.
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Old October 21, 2017   #58
KarenO
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Another week gone by still quite good. Made some guacamole with a couple today.
I should sauce them but I am so curious to see how long they can go.
Stored in my kitchen at normal room temp and humidity.
Stored cool and dry I think they really could store for a few months.
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Old October 21, 2017   #59
KarenO
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Another week gone by still quite good. Made some guacamole with a couple today.
I should sauce them but I am so curious to see how long they can go.
Stored in my kitchen at normal room temp and humidity.
Stored cool and dry I think they really could store for a few months.
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Old October 21, 2017   #60
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Such a great find!
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