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Old July 18, 2022   #1
paradajky
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Default will this one ripen?

Accidentally knocked off a taiga this morning while lowering/leaning the tomatoes for the first time. It broke off right at the vine knuckle (picture framing makes it look like it is attached, it is completely off, sorry about the composition).. any chance this will actually ripen, or should I drop it into my fermenting pickle jar?
Thank you for your time
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Old July 18, 2022   #2
PaulF
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Like a lot of later fall tomatoes, wrap in newspaper, put into a cool, dry, dark place and see what happens. Too nice looking to become a pickle. Good luck.
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Old July 18, 2022   #3
Balr14
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I put green tomatoes I want to ripen in a brown paper bag on a shelf in my basement. It takes weeks or longer, but it works. I usually have several dozen to ripen at the end of the growing season that I had to pick to avoid frost.
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Old July 18, 2022   #4
paradajky
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Okay, thank you, I'll see if I can get it to ripen. Another thought, I suppose, would be to fry it up! Maybe will give me a sneak peak at texture for the upcoming tomatoes
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Old July 18, 2022   #5
KarenO
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It looks mature, full size , prob close to breaking so I think it will ripen
Just sit it on the counter out of direct sunlight
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Old July 19, 2022   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulF View Post
Like a lot of later fall tomatoes, wrap in newspaper, put into a cool, dry, dark place and see what happens. Too nice looking to become a pickle. Good luck.
Very good Advice. He will be surprised with goodness, Amen!
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Old July 19, 2022   #7
MrsJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balr14 View Post
I put green tomatoes I want to ripen in a brown paper bag on a shelf in my basement. It takes weeks or longer, but it works. I usually have several dozen to ripen at the end of the growing season that I had to pick to avoid frost.
I wish I had a Basement to storage my Winter Vegetables. This is the First Year my Cushaws and all Quash Plants are ready before most of my Tomatoes. But the Texas Wild Cherry Tomatoes and my Red Robins Dwarf are my Biggest Producers.
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Old July 19, 2022   #8
MrsJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenO View Post
It looks mature, full size , prob close to breaking so I think it will ripen
Just sit it on the counter out of direct sunlight
Karen

Sometime I like to look at the Tomato Ripen on the counter too, especially if it's big and beautiful like this one.
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Old July 19, 2022   #9
ramapojoe
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That will never ripen ito a good tomato. Pickle'd tomatoes are excellent and so are green fried tomatoe's. Don't waste three weeks putting in a brown bag to eat a half a## red tomatoe
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Old July 19, 2022   #10
slugworth
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go red just give it time
Since it isn't precious or a sole survivor I would just let it sit on a windowsill.
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Old July 21, 2022   #11
MrBig46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulF View Post
Like a lot of later fall tomatoes, wrap in newspaper, put into a cool, dry, dark place and see what happens. Too nice looking to become a pickle. Good luck.
I agree with what PaulF wrote. Given that the tomato is light green in color and has a shiny skin, which is usually a sign of botanical ripeness, I assume room ripening should be successful.
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Old July 23, 2022   #12
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Yes Yes Yes, I had to look-up The Meaning of "Botanical Ripeness" because I suffer from Dyslexia and just have to understand everything during the ripening processes and possibilities of successful ripening chances of this "Big" Green Shiny Tomato show in the Picture. As I have never had a Tomato This Large to become separated from the Plant with no color at all.

This is what I found from Wikipedia:
Sources Data From : "Climacteric" botany –
Generally, fleshy fruits can be divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of a respiratory increase at the onset of ripening. This respiratory increase -- which is proceeded, or accompanied, by a rise in ethylene -- is called a climacteric, and there are marked differences in the development of climacteric and non-climacteric fruits. Climacteric fruit can be either monocots or dicots and the ripening of these fruits can still be achieved even if the fruit has been harvested at the end of their growth period (prior to ripening on the parent plant).[1] Non-climacteric fruits ripen without ethylene and respiration bursts, the ripening process is slower, and for the most part they will not be able to ripen if the fruit is not attached to the parent plant.[2] Examples of climacteric fruits include apples, bananas, melons, apricots, tomatoes, as well as most stone fruits. Non-climactic fruits on the other hand include citrus fruits, grapes, and strawberries(However, non-climacteric melons and apricots do exist, and grapes and strawberries harbor several active ethylene receptors.) Essentially, a key difference between climacteric and non-climacteric fruits (particularly for commercial production) is that climacteric fruits continue to ripen following their harvest, whereas non-climacteric fruits do not.

Overview
The climacteric is a stage of fruit ripening associated with increased ethylene production and a rise in cellular respiration and is the final physiological process that marks the end of fruit maturation and the beginning of fruit senescence. Its defining point is a sudden rise in respiration of the fruit, and normally takes place without any external influences. After the climacteric period, respiration rates (noted by carbon dioxide production) return to or dip below the pre-climacteric rates. The climacteric event also leads to other changes in the fruit, including pigment changes and sugar release. For those fruits raised as food, the climacteric event marks the peak of edible ripeness, with fruits having the best taste and texture for consumption. After the event, fruits are more susceptible to fungal invasion and begin to degrade by cell death. If a fruit were to over-ripen, it could be detrimental to the post harvest of the fruit, meaning the shipment and storage of the fruits for marketing.[3] The over ripening could also lead to a pathogen attack, which can lead to the fruits developing diseases and exhibiting symptoms like necrosis and leaf wilting.[4]

Ethylene Production
Ethylene is a hormone in plants known for its role in accelerating the ripening of fleshy fruits. There are two systems, depending on the stage of development, for ethylene production in climacteric fruit. The first system occurs in immature climacteric fruit, where ethylene will inhibit the biosynthesis of more ethylene by a negative feedback system. This ensures that the fruit doesn't begin to undergo ripening until it is fully mature. The second system for ethylene production acts in mature climacteric fruit. In this autocatalytic system, the ethylene will promote its own biosynthesis and will make sure that the fruit will ripen evenly after the ripening begins.[2] In other words, a small amount of ethylene in mature, climacteric fruits, will cause a burst of ethylene production and induce even ripening.

Ethylene production begins when 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (the precursor of ethylene) is formed from the amino acid methionine/Met). An adenosynlated step takes place to change Met to SAM. SAM is then metabolized to ACC by 5ʹ-methylthioadenosine by ACC synthase which is then recycled back into 1-methylcyclopropane (1-MCP, an ethylene inhibitor) where another round of ethylene biosynthesis takes place.[5] Along with the production and control of ethylene, auxin also plays a major role in climacteric fruit ripening. Auxin, a plant hormone that allows for cell elongation, is accumulated during the initial growing and developmental phases of the plants life cycle. During ethylene gene induction it was found that auxin related genes (aux/IAA and AUX1) represents the transcription factors that induce 1-MCP.[6]

Ripening includes many changes in fleshy fruit including changes in color, texture, and firmness. Additionally, there may be an increase in certain volatiles (metabolites the plant releases into the air) as well as changes in sugar (starch, sucrose, glucose, fructose, etc.) and acid (malic, citric, and ascorbic) balance. these changes, particularly in sugars, are important in determining fruit quality and sweetness. [7]
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Old July 24, 2022   #13
ramapojoe
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ok
let us know how that green thing taste next month.
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Old July 25, 2022   #14
Kongobongo
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Are those ever nice looking tomatoes! Have you grown them before? And how is the taste?
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Old July 25, 2022   #15
paradajky
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Ramapojoe: I agree with you, I suspect the tomato will not be good if it actually ripens. That said, I decided to try and see how long it will take and what the flavor will be like compared to the vine ripened ones, since I'm not too keen now on trying pickled or fried. After my request for input, I found pickled green tomatoes from a brand called "Bubbies" at the store, I tried them and didn't really care for them (I do really like their cucumber pickles though). I also am not in a frying mood these days.


Kongobongo: no, first time growing them, still waiting for them to ripen probably another 2-3 weeks to go (had a late start this year). According to many threads here, the taiga is supposed to be an amazing heart tomato, and right now is the only large-tomato that continues to set tomatoes for me instead of green vines and leaves. I'm excited! However, given my issues, I suspect they will be mealy You're welcome to read through my whining and struggles here.
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