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Old February 27, 2022   #1
DK2021
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Default Hablitzia tamnoides

Wondering if anyone has experience with growing this interesting edible perennial. Searching the web I see some statements that definitively say this is a plant for at partial shade, others report that it does just fine in full sun. As I am going to be planting these in a presumably permanent location, I'd like to have a bit more certainty. Maybe the answer is that this plant does fine both in full sun and in partial shade.
I have a half dozen pots of plants I started from seed last year, which I hope have survived the winter, plus another dozen pots of happy seedlings under growlights indoors.
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Old February 28, 2022   #2
MrsJustice
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I have the Caucasian Spinach, but I just cannot eat it, yet. It's been growing here before I owned the farmland. It grows on fences, even in the shaded areas on one of my mini-farms. It looks pretty growing on old Historical Houses as well. It will be good from hard times like War, maybe I will eat it then. Maybe if I plant my own Caucasian Spinach " I will eat it.

Noting that the Hablitzia Tamnoides is the same as my Caucasian Spinach. I do not know if the Caucasian Spinach was growing here by Shepard Mallory or the Historical Home we protect from 1901, built by a Master Builder who was his Master Builder before coming to Fort Monroe. Some of it was growing on the back of the house but we removed it to the fenced area in 2005.

Maybe we can trade one day; if I can bring myself to eat it.
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Old February 28, 2022   #3
DK2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsJustice View Post
I have the Caucasian Spinach, but I just cannot eat it, yet. It's been growing here before I owned the farmland. It grows on fences, even in the shaded areas on one of my mini-farms. It looks pretty growing on old Historical Houses as well. It will be good from hard times like War, maybe I will eat it then. Maybe if I plant my own Caucasian Spinach " I will eat it.

Noting that the Hablitzia Tamnoides is the same as my Caucasian Spinach. I do not know if the Caucasian Spinach was growing here by Shepard Mallory or the Historical Home we protect from 1901, built by a Master Builder who was his Master Builder before coming to Fort Monroe. Some of it was growing on the back of the house but we removed it to the fenced area in 2005.

Maybe we can trade one day; if I can bring myself to eat it.
Are you sure it is Hablitzia? As far as I understand the history of this plant, it was introduced to the US only in the mid-2010's.
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Old March 1, 2022   #4
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That's why I did not eat it, yet, Amen!!

By the time my husband would get an assignment near a Native American Tribe, the leaves were dried up. I took it all over the United States to save all the Fruit and Vegetables growing here to save and understand the food history. Especially, the green tomatoes that were stated to be growing all over this small town that was called Chesapeake City in front of Fort Monroe in 1861, that was given to my people by The Honorable Benjamin Butler, before being called Phoebus. Learning from Dr. Carollyn and others here at Tomatoville, it was called the "Aunt Molly Ground Tomato Cherry." It's growing all over the place at this present time". Growing on Their Building As Mr. Henry Phoebus in 1901 Promised my people to Protect the Lands of Banker, Mallory, and James Townsend. Since Shepard Mallory and my Great Grandfather traded with Native Americans their food Supply up passed the State of Iowa. It is possible this England Edible Plant was traded here as a Food Source for private consumption. Noting that Shepard Mallory spelled his name with 1 P as society spells his name, Sheppard Mallory. He may have been dyslexia like me.
My people, here were intelligent farmers with their newfound freedom with the skills of Native Americans and freely eat the Caucasian Spinach. They would have had a plant to trade with Native Americans. They also used their skills to teach Native Americans to build strong Homes; like the Historical Family that build Our Home before this town was called Phoebus.
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Last edited by MrsJustice; March 1, 2022 at 08:26 PM. Reason: Dyslexia
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Old March 7, 2022   #5
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DK2021
I forgot to tell you that Caucasian Spinach is also called "Hablitzia tamnoides".

Here is the Definition; It is named after a German-born Russian botanist, Carl Ludwig von Hablitz (1752–1821). Also known as Karl Ivanovich Gablits. Although it doesn't seem to be well known as an edible in its native region, it was introduced to Scandinavia in the mid-nineteenth century and began to be eaten by a few people.

I Checked again. I have 3 different kinds of Ivy Vines growing on my Historical Farmland of Shepard Mallory. The only one that was edible was the Caucasian Spinach. It’s been around since the 1700’s. Maybe from England as it was mostly Mainly eaten in England. I guess you are finding out like me as I try to "Save the Food History of Contraband Slaves" who were proudly conservative like me that many Historical Vegetables were called different Names by a small new population of citizens of the United States. Pulling together their Resources from all walks of life brings forth the needed skills for survival by growing the Caucasian Spinach here on my historical Properties around 1861-1963 on their houses. Grown here on our Homes Constructed by their own hands that brought forth Beauty and a secret Food Source. I am so proud to be taken Care of this Last Home of this Historical Community that was dismantled after the Civil War and forgotten. Saving the food history is vital to all in the United States to learn about this forgotten Conservative Proud Black Community from 1861. As Conservative people from all walks of Life should be Covered under the United States Constitution to protect God and Country, Amen!!

"Hablitzia tamnoides"/ Caucasian Spinach means the small eatable Plant, Amen!!.
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