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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #1
habitat_gardener
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Default Can okra be moved?

I planted the first batch of okra about 3 inches apart. I had a dozen varieties, with some new seed and some seed as old as 2003, intending to plant accordingly, but on the way to the garden the seeds got mixed together. The ones that germinated are mostly at the ends of a 4x8 bed. They are all about an inch high.

Can I transplant some of them so that they will be 1-2 feet apart? Or will that be a waste of time?
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #2
PaulF
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It just so happens I am the first to answer this serious question with my kind of answer: yes, out of the garden and into the compost pile. Now wait for the real replies.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #3
GoDawgs
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Can't hurt to try as you'd have to pull them to thin the row anyway. Just get a nice chunk of soil with it.

Paul, I guess you won't be wanting any of the okra and tomatoes we're having with lunch today, eh?
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #4
brownrexx
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I would give it a try. I start mine indoors in pots and transplant it to the garden with no ill effects.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #5
PaulF
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I would love the tomatoes but forego the okra.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #6
brownrexx
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I make stewed tomatoes with sliced okra added and it acts as a natural thickener. Honestly I can't taste the okra but DH can and he loves it.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #7
b54red
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habitat_gardener View Post
I planted the first batch of okra about 3 inches apart. I had a dozen varieties, with some new seed and some seed as old as 2003, intending to plant accordingly, but on the way to the garden the seeds got mixed together. The ones that germinated are mostly at the ends of a 4x8 bed. They are all about an inch high.

Can I transplant some of them so that they will be 1-2 feet apart? Or will that be a waste of time?
I have done it successfully before. It is best to do it late in the day and for even better results on a day when rain is in the forecast. Like someone said make sure to get a good chunk of dirt with it and set it in a hole already scooped out and then water with a dilute fertilizer and keep them watered for a few days.

I used to have to do the same thing almost every time I planted them directly in the soil. I have been starting them in cups for years to eliminate that problem and they transplant with no problem especially if they are over six inches tall with a good root ball. I now grow mostly Cowhorn types and they are so large that I try to give them a couple of feet between them.

Bill
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Old 1 Week Ago   #8
habitat_gardener
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I did a test run a couple days ago, digging up 3 into prepared holes and the tossing a handful of compost around them before I watered. So far so good. The inferno is coming this week, two days 105F and two more days 100F+, so I’m letting them be for a few days.

In the meantime, I’m germinating a new batch so that I will be able to know who’s who.

One more question: do I need to bag blossoms if I want to save seeds?
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9
ddsack
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Yes, if you are growing more than one variety and want to keep seed pure. One source claimed it was possible to cross pollinate up to 1/4 mile, though I imagine you'd have to have no obstructions and perfect wind conditions. Or maybe the bees did it!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #10
Zeedman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habitat_gardener View Post
I did a test run a couple days ago, digging up 3 into prepared holes and the tossing a handful of compost around them before I watered. So far so good. The inferno is coming this week, two days 105F and two more days 100F+, so I’m letting them be for a few days.

In the meantime, I’m germinating a new batch so that I will be able to know who’s who.

One more question: do I need to bag blossoms if I want to save seeds?
Yes, you would need to bag blossoms if saving seed from more than one variety. Okra is a rich pollen source, so bees will most likely be working the flowers. Supposedly okra self-pollinates, so it may set pods on its own if bagged... never tried it myself. If not, you may need to open the bags long enough to hand pollinate, using a clean brush for each variety.


BTW if saving seed, it has been my observation that provided the plants are not crowded, letting one pod per plant go for seed has little to no effect on yield. The plants I allowed to do that last year bore all season.
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