Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating onions, garlic, shallots and leeks.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old October 4, 2016   #1
My Foot Smells
Tomatovillian™
 
My Foot Smells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pulaski County, Arkansas
Posts: 1,200
Default Elephant Garlic

just ordered 25 bulbs for 9.99 from bonanza (missourijack), never grown before. I read this is actually a leak.

after some short reading on the net, some ppl say put in the freezer for a few weeks and plant later in the year for southern climate. never done that either, any thoughts?

also read that customary to plant on short day (12/21) and harvest on longest day (06/21) or thereabouts. never done that neither. usually plant in late October, but may wait till turkey day.
My Foot Smells is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 4, 2016   #2
ilex
Tomatovillian™
 
ilex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Spain
Posts: 399
Default

I've got something similar and I try to plant early September. I use first as baby leaks starting December.
ilex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 4, 2016   #3
My Foot Smells
Tomatovillian™
 
My Foot Smells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pulaski County, Arkansas
Posts: 1,200
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ilex View Post
I've got something similar and I try to plant early September. I use first as baby leaks starting December.
Nice, probably could manage that here with the weather as winter doesn't really cool down until the new year. Have a bazillion wild green onions that sprout up in the field......

Relegated to soft neck varieties due to spring weather and early summer being hotter than northern counterparts. First time growing the BIG garlic, we shall see.
My Foot Smells is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 5, 2016   #4
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,611
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by My Foot Smells View Post
just ordered 25 bulbs for 9.99 from bonanza (missourijack), never grown before. I read this is actually a leak.

after some short reading on the net, some ppl say put in the freezer for a few weeks and plant later in the year for southern climate. never done that either, any thoughts?

also read that customary to plant on short day (12/21) and harvest on longest day (06/21) or thereabouts. never done that neither. usually plant in late October, but may wait till turkey day.
I haven't put them in the freezer. I just put the Elephant garlic in the refrigerator a couple weeks before planting.

I planted ours last December 21 (Shortest day) and it was ready in June. I don't think planting a month earlier would hurt a thing unless the ground temperature is still pretty hot. I just remembered where I read that http://www.harvesttotable.com/2012/0...lanted-garlic/

Temperature. Garlic germinates in soil temperature of 55°F and grows best in soil temperatures ranging from 55°F to 75°F (13-24°C). Garlic that has established roots will overwinter best.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 6, 2016   #5
ilex
Tomatovillian™
 
ilex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Spain
Posts: 399
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post
I haven't put them in the freezer. I just put the Elephant garlic in the refrigerator a couple weeks before planting.

I planted ours last December 21 (Shortest day) and it was ready in June. I don't think planting a month earlier would hurt a thing unless the ground temperature is still pretty hot. I just remembered where I read that http://www.harvesttotable.com/2012/0...lanted-garlic/

Temperature. Garlic germinates in soil temperature of 55°F and grows best in soil temperatures ranging from 55°F to 75°F (13-24°C). Garlic that has established roots will overwinter best.
Forget garlic, it's a leek.

Leeks have a very short summer rest. They will sprout at the minimum temperature drop in late August/September. Sometimes just after first rain. Obviously, soil is quite hot (I'm at the equivalent of San Diego).
ilex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 6, 2016   #6
My Foot Smells
Tomatovillian™
 
My Foot Smells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pulaski County, Arkansas
Posts: 1,200
Default

yes, I meant to say refridgerator, not freezer. Thank you for the correction.
My Foot Smells is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7, 2016   #7
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,611
Default

You're right in the heart of Arkansas, I would plant in November too. http://www.usclimatedata.com/climate...tates/usar0909

ilex, you are right. It is a leek that is like an onion too. The bulb looks like garlic. I have been as close to San Diego as 1,165 km - Somewhere in-between lives my sister-in-law in a desert town. I don't dare to cross that desert - she might be there.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 10, 2016   #8
Medbury Gardens
Tomatovillian™
 
Medbury Gardens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Medbury, New Zealand
Posts: 1,765
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlittleSalt View Post

Temperature. Garlic germinates in soil temperature of 55°F and grows best in soil temperatures ranging from 55°F to 75°F (13-24°C). Garlic that has established roots will overwinter best.
Well technically term 'germinates' refers to a seed.
__________________
Richard




Medbury Gardens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 10, 2016   #9
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,279
Default

Who decides what is what in the plant world and why?
I have known the better part of my life elephant garlic was a leek, about the same minute I heard of the stuff the next I heard it was a leek.
I think it was on the Frugal Gourmet show on PBS years ago.
Why is elephant garlic classed as a leak and not garlic.

Worth
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 10, 2016   #10
GrowingCoastal
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Vancouver Island Canada BC
Posts: 389
Default

Apparently, elephant garlic does not have the same health benefits as regular garlic. Who knows? Maybe it has other health benefits.
GrowingCoastal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 10, 2016   #11
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 4,141
Default

Technically I think it means Elephant Garlic can cross with leeks, but not with garlic. Down to the DNA I guess, they are a match for the leek.
Where neither the Elephant nor the true garlic often make seeds, maybe it's mostly a moot point? Or does EG often flower and set seeds? If so, could cross with your leeks.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 10, 2016   #12
AlittleSalt
Tomatovillian™
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Zone 8A Texas Heat Zone 9
Posts: 9,611
Default

I have read that they are called scallops, garlic, and leeks. They look like garlic to me. The only reason I've grown it is because others have told me I cannot grow it in-ground. Wrong.
__________________
Salt, AlittleSalt, Robert
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 10, 2016   #13
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bastrop Texas Lost Pines Forest.
Posts: 30,279
Default

https://youtu.be/CLnADKgurvc

https://youtu.be/RJv2Mugm2RI
__________________
Home of Cactus Flats Botanical Gardens.
The dinner table is where we need to get acquainted not the battlefield.
I Seek The Truth.

Last edited by Worth1; October 11, 2016 at 12:04 AM.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 11, 2016   #14
ilex
Tomatovillian™
 
ilex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Spain
Posts: 399
Default

Most leeks make bulbs, specially old ones. Wild leeks make lots of them. Elephant garlic bulbs just happens to look like garlic, but anything else is quite leek.

Note there's a real garlic called elephant garlic grown in South America (Chiloe Island).
ilex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 31, 2016   #15
svalli
Tomatovillian™
 
svalli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Vaasa, Finland, latitude N 63°
Posts: 683
Default

Last fall I ordered elephant garlic from UK and planted to my garlic bed here in Finland. Last winter was harsh and none of the cloves survived. Now I am getting some cloves from a grower in Finland, but it is already too late to plant them here so I and will refrigerate them and plant during spring.

My DH is currently in Japan on a business trip and I asked him to look for local garlic varieties. This morning he e-mailed me that elephant garlic is commonly used there. I started to google it and found a thing called Japanese garlic, which does not look like a regular garlic clove. Then I noticed that they look exactly like elephant garlic corms. This Japanese garlic is advertised to have some special health values, but I could not find any good information about the plants themselves and I can find information about them only on English ans Spanish, but nothing in Japanese. Many Japanese sites however had a lot of pictures of the giant elephant garlic called janboninniku (some showed also the corms attached to the heads).

I do not speak Spanish, but I found this video interesting.
https://youtu.be/MWb9kSh1fzE
As I understood it shows planting elephant garlic from cloves and corms, which grow to a giant single bulb the first year.

Sari
__________________
"I only want to live in peace, plant potatoes and dream."
- Moomin-troll by Tove Jansson
svalli is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:31 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★