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Old February 18, 2017   #31
joseph
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deborah View Post
What does hardneck mean?
It means that it makes a flower. The flower stem is hard, so they are called "hardneck". Some garlic varieties do not flower, so the stem stays soft and flexible until harvest.
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Old February 18, 2017   #32
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Oh! Thanks for explaining.
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Old June 28, 2017   #33
Medbury Gardens
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Originally Posted by velikipop View Post
. As far as I know growing garlic from bulbils takes about three years to produce a mature head of garlic.
If they are given plenty of space they can grow to full size with 10 months growth
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Old June 28, 2017   #34
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Recently I ran across this article, I think it's a good resource for this topic.
http://garlicseed.blogspot.com/p/gro...-seed.html?m=1
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Old June 28, 2017   #35
Medbury Gardens
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Yes thats one of the better sources of info
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Old June 29, 2017   #36
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Nice to hear, Medbury Gardens!

It was intriguing to learn here that it might work to put flowering scapes in a glass of water, has anyone done that successfully to get them to seed? I would think seed formation would require the presence of the roots.
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Old June 29, 2017   #37
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Originally Posted by Dak View Post
Nice to hear, Medbury Gardens!

It was intriguing to learn here that it might work to put flowering scapes in a glass of water, has anyone done that successfully to get them to seed? I would think seed formation would require the presence of the roots.
No, I haven't tried it...but as long as you can keep the flower alive, reproduction will progress. I'd be worried about keeping the flower around long enough to finish.
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Old June 29, 2017   #38
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I used the cut scape method last year. I did wait until they had been open, debulbiled, and had plenty of time to be pollinated. A lot of the garlic still had most of the outer wrapper still so I think my timing was perfect. I didn't see any difference in production. I liked this method a bit better only because of the fact the garlic I harvested still had an outer wrapper and kept better because of it. Other wise by the time the seed heads develop and start to dry down the outer wrapper has deteriorated and you pretty much just have the cloves with no wrapping.


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Old June 29, 2017   #39
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Question -- when you debulbil, are the bulbils able to be saved and planted, or do you need to choose between one or the other -- bulbils to plant or a chance at true seeds? I left three with the scapes on planning to harvest bulbils, but now wondering if I should try for seeds in addition to, or instead of.
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Old June 30, 2017   #40
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For most alliums, 3 to 5 flower stems is the minimum for seed production. So if you use all 3 for seed, you'll need to remove the bulbils.

I'm not sure if the bulbils will be far enough along to be useful when removed.
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Old June 30, 2017   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjc View Post
For most alliums, 3 to 5 flower stems is the minimum for seed production. So if you use all 3 for seed, you'll need to remove the bulbils.

I'm not sure if the bulbils will be far enough along to be useful when removed.


Thank you. I think I'll stick with harvesting bulbils this year and maybe leave more scapes on next year to try for seeds.
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Old June 30, 2017   #42
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the bulbils will still be fine to plant if you remove them carefully so you can still have a go at producing true seed, it can be your practise run
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Old July 1, 2017   #43
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All the bulbils I have removed do just fine when replanting. Then tend to be a different stages. The outer ones are starting the loosen on there own and the innermost and still forming on my chesnok red when I remove. I know that when Joseph removed his he just lets them fall to the ground. The next year he has garlic as thick as grass!


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Old July 1, 2017   #44
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I tried this one year with cut scapes of several varieties, Chesnok, Persian Star did flower and also produced a ton of bulbils and the survival rate was probably not 100% but still I got lots of rounds. I managed to coax a couple of flowers out of Spanish Roja but didn't get good survival of fall planted bulbils, which has turned out to be typical of our location here for SR, so it was not about the 'removal' process. Also removed many bulbils from Leningrad and Music, which didn't produce flowers in any case, and the survival wasn't great for removed bulbils, maybe 30-50%. Porcelains in general may be more of a challenge for getting true seed, cw Purple Stripe or Marbled PS varieties, afaik from what I've read.

I didn't get any true seeds in the end, but it was an interesting process. Took months! I enjoyed the flowers.
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