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General information and discussion about cultivating onions, garlic, shallots and leeks.

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Old April 9, 2017   #1
GoGayleGo
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Default Nitrogen for garlic

Filaree's instructions say:

"In the spring when garlic plants are experiencing most of their vegetative growth, water like any garden green. Nitrogen is appreciated at this stage of growth."

I use 10/10/10 for my SIP, not sure what to use for the garlic...???

Thanks in advance for your help.
Gayle
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Old April 9, 2017   #2
Worth1
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I think what you have will be just fine.
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Old April 9, 2017   #3
KarenO
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Well composted Manure if you want a natural high nitrogen fertilizer
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Old April 9, 2017   #4
henry
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As the cows are long gone from our garlic farm we use blood meal as the spring top dressing about three pounds per 40 inch by 100 foot bed. We are starting to grow field peas as a green manure crop and expect to need less blood meal in the future.
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Old April 9, 2017   #5
TomNJ
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Blood meal (13-0-0) if you are organic, or lawn fertilizer (29-0-4 or similar) if you are not. You can also use a mixture to provide some immediate nitrogen and some delayed nitrogen. I use blood meal in early March, early April, and early May, each time at 2 lbs per 100 sq ft.

Grow the green, and the green will grow the bulb.

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Old April 9, 2017   #6
jtjmartin
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Tom,

Where do you normally buy your blood meal? I would use it if I could find a better price.

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Old April 9, 2017   #7
henry
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Best price I have found for the eastern usa.
http://www.7springsfarm.com/blood-me...-12-0-0-50-lb/
$56.00
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Old April 10, 2017   #8
TomNJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtjmartin View Post
Tom,

Where do you normally buy your blood meal? I would use it if I could find a better price.

Jeff
I buy mine at Seven Springs Farm here in Floyd County, VA. Runs $56 for a 50 lb bag, which goes a long way.

http://www.7springsfarm.com/nitrogen-sources/

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Old April 10, 2017   #9
jtjmartin
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Tom:

Thanks - great price at a little over $1/lb. OK, now I'm hoping I get some work out around Floyd County!

Jeff
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Old April 11, 2017   #10
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Bloodmeal is not commonly sold here and I do not grow organic, so I am planning to use calcium nitrate when watering my garlic after they start forming shoots. Calcium nitrate is also used in greenhouses and works well to prevent bottom end rot in tomatoes. It is commonly sold for farmers in huge bags, but last fall I found this stuff at reasonable prices in containers suitable for home gardeners, so I purchased enough to use for my tomatoes and all alliums.
http://www.yara.co.uk/crop-nutrition...ing-bulb-size/

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Old April 11, 2017   #11
ilex
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I use manure
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Old April 11, 2017   #12
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I think I'll try the blood meal this year since I have some kicking around - I bought it mislabeled as bone meal - blue-black and not!
All I've done for spring ferts in my couple of years past is a little fish emulsion at best. Mostly just let em go on the bone meal at planting time.... guess I can do better!
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Old April 12, 2017   #13
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blood and/or bone meal can be attractive to critters, dogs etc.
just FYI in case raccoons etc are a problem in your area. even my usually non digger old lady of a dog finds bone meal irresistible and has been known to dig in my beds when I use it
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Old April 12, 2017   #14
AlittleSalt
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Just grow it. Take some and don't add anything.
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Old April 12, 2017   #15
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Buckwheat gets planted when the garlic is dug in early July. Mid Sept. it's turned in along with large amounts of horse manure. Seed goes in 2 weeks later.

Garlic needs no additional nitrogen during the growing season. Garlic is not the heavy feeder that an onion is. Plant it, mulch hard and forget it.
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