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Old May 18, 2017   #16
PhilaGardener
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Some folks feel that bulbils forming lower on the stem is a stress response.
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Old May 18, 2017   #17
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Some folks feel that bulbils forming lower on the stem is a stress response.
It's aliens.
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Old May 18, 2017   #18
henry
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It's aliens.
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True
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Old May 18, 2017   #19
Father'sDaughter
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I got it 2 years ago from someone, it's definitely hardneck. Last year it made no scapes. Now this year I'm planting a bit of those and a new one, also definitely hardneck. Again no sign of scapes on any of them, and I doubt they will.


Just curious -- how do you know it's "definitely hardneck" if it hasn't produced scapes in the two years you've grown it? By definition, a hardneck produces a scape. Did the person you got it from tell you what variety is was supposed to be?
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Old May 18, 2017   #20
jmsieglaff
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Just curious -- how do you know it's "definitely hardneck" if it hasn't produced scapes in the two years you've grown it? By definition, a hardneck produces a scape. Did the person you got it from tell you what variety is was supposed to be?
I agree, my first guess is maybe it isn't a hardneck.

My other thought is, maybe last year (the first year you grew this garlic?) there was stress such that it did not produce scapes. Now as far as this year, I believe it is too early for scapes--at least here in Wisconsin (~43N latitude) I usually don't get scapes until mid June.
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Old May 18, 2017   #21
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Just curious -- how do you know it's "definitely hardneck" if it hasn't produced scapes in the two years you've grown it? By definition, a hardneck produces a scape. Did the person you got it from tell you what variety is was supposed to be?
I have seen the garden, it had scapes at that time (also some of them had these bulbils suspended in the neck as svalli said), also the hardneck leaves a hard woody thing in the middle of the cloves.
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Old May 18, 2017   #22
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I have seen the garden, it had scapes at that time (also some of them had these bulbils suspended in the neck as svalli said), also the hardneck leaves a hard woody thing in the middle of the cloves.


The hard woody thing is the actually the base of the scape stalk.

Keep us posted on what the end up doing this year!
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Old May 18, 2017   #23
RayR
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I just noticed scapes forming on my elephant garlic, but my regular garlic hasn't started yet. It is hard to know what effect our roller coaster weather is having this year.
Elephant garlic isn't actually in the garlic family, it's related to leeks.
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Old May 18, 2017   #24
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Elephant garlic isn't actually in the garlic family, it's related to leeks.
Right,t but I have never been able to wrap my mind around it.
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Old May 18, 2017   #25
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Did you plant in spring or fall? I think spring planting can cause them to not produce scapes?

But honestly, if you have some bulbil things down in the stem, I think it is a softneck. Those bulbils look so cool!!! Like growing your own garden gnomes.
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Old May 18, 2017   #26
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I think we have came to the conclusion it is artichoke garlic.
Yes dont ask me why but that is what soft neck is called.
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Old May 18, 2017   #27
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Right,t but I have never been able to wrap my mind around it.
How about Garlic Chives are closely related to onions, not garlic.
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Old May 18, 2017   #28
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How about Garlic Chives are closely related to onions, not garlic.
Might as well add potato onions.
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Old May 20, 2017   #29
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Might as well add potato onions.
Worth


Which some people mistake for shallots...
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Old May 20, 2017   #30
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zipcode, Does your aunt grow the ones with real scapes and the ones with the bulbils in the neck in same bed mixed with each other? She must have at least two different garlic varieties, if some have scapes and others have bulbils lower at the stem. If she has not separated the varieties at harvest time, you may have gotten a softneck bulb with hard stem in the middle due to the bulbils close to the neck.

I'm growing multiple garlic varieties and keeping the varieties separate at harvest and curing time is a lot of work.

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