Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating peppers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 3 Days Ago   #16
pmcgrady
Tomatovillian™
 
pmcgrady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 1,131
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhines81 View Post
I am guessing there a some calculation flaws with the calendar (at least with the peppers). It says to start my tomatoes 2 weeks before my peppers and my egg plant a week before the tomatoes. Eggplant and peppers are started at the same time ... and that is generally 2 weeks before the tomatoes.
The peas also seem to be a couple of weeks too early.
Really? And you have the correct last frost date in for 2018?
pmcgrady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Days Ago   #17
rhines81
Tomatovillian™
 
rhines81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Zone 5A, Poconos
Posts: 559
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcgrady View Post
Really? And you have the correct last frost date in for 2018?
Ooops, must have been the beer I had watching the Eagle game. But it does say to start tomatoes on Mar 31st and Peppers April 7th (only 1 week later, not 2) ... but still incorrect by my book. Eggplants it says Mar 24th.

Peppers and eggplants should be started at least 2 weeks earlier than tomatoes. Last year I jumped the gun and started most of my peppers in early-mid Feb and my tomatoes in late Feb/early Mar. It was way too early for the tomatoes as I found out when they got too large too quick, but the peppers were somewhat manageable and gave me a good crop.

This year, I think I will probably not start my peppers and eggplants until Mar 3rd and tomatoes will not be started until the 31st. Another lesson learned from last year is that I will not grow for anyone else but myself ... it was just too much of a burden with all of the extra plants. They can learn to grow for themselves or buy from the garden center like they used to do.
rhines81 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Days Ago   #18
ScottinAtlanta
Tomatovillian™
 
ScottinAtlanta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 2,265
Default

Superhots start slower than sweet peppers - I usually start mine in late Dec for a late March plant out. Watch your soil temp closely - keep it between 75 and 85 degrees. I use a laser pointer thermometer to test the temps in the germinating tray. You will be surprised how much the temps differ from the center of the tray to the edges. So start your hot peppers in the center, then the eggs, then the toms around the edge. Just a tip.
ScottinAtlanta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 Days Ago   #19
JerryHaskins
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 86
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottinAtlanta View Post
Superhots start slower than sweet peppers - I usually start mine in late Dec for a late March plant out. Watch your soil temp closely - keep it between 75 and 85 degrees. I use a laser pointer thermometer to test the temps in the germinating tray. You will be surprised how much the temps differ from the center of the tray to the edges. So start your hot peppers in the center, then the eggs, then the toms around the edge. Just a tip.
Great ideas! Thanks.
JerryHaskins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Day Ago   #20
DonDuck
Tomatovillian™
 
DonDuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Corinth, texas
Posts: 14
Default

I seem to remember some quick start method to treat hard or slow to germinate pepper and eggplant seeds. I can't remember the details, but I think it is something like soaking the seeds for a few days in warm water on a heat mat. After pre-soaking the seeds a few days, plant them in seed starting mix with very little moisture. I have no idea how accurate my memory is.

I planted my tomato, pepper; and egg plant seeds on January 6 with the peppers and egg plant seeds on heat mats set to about 80 degrees F. My tomatoes will be set out after mid March if the long term weather forecast looks good. My peppers and egg plant will be set out between early and late April. The peppers and eggplant don't seem to grow well in the cooler soil which tomatoes like.
DonDuck is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 1 Day Ago   #21
JerryHaskins
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 86
Default

There is a quick start method whereby you put the seeds on wet paper towel and place the towel in a zip-lock bag and leave it in a warm place (such as on top of the fridge) for a few days.

I found some detailed guidance that came with my pepper seeds from Pepper Joe's.

-----------------------------------------------------
Quote:
How to Propagate Habanero Pepper Seed - Native to Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, this tender perennial is grown as an annual in the U.S. It requires a long growing season; most gardeners start habanero seeds indoors, 7 to 10 weeks (January 4 to January 25 in zone 8) before the last frost date (March 15 in zone 8).

Germination - Habanero peppers have a reputation for slow germination. Habanero seeds may begin sprouting in 11 days and can take up to 5 weeks to germinate.

Soil - When preparing the seed-starting trays, use a sterile seed-starting mix. Using warm water to moisten the seed-starting mix helps keep the wet mixture warm until the seeds are planted. Generally three habanero seeds are planted in each cell of the planting tray and covered with 1/4 to 1/2 inch of the warm, moist mix.

Temperature - Peppers are tropical plants and require heat to germinate. While most fruit and vegetable seeds will sprout at soil temperatures of 65 degrees Fahrenheit, habanero peppers need warm soil to germinate, preferably between 90 and 95 degrees. Placing the seed-starting trays on a seedling heat mat with a thermostat controller allows you to maintain a consistently warm temperature. If a heat mat is not available, the top of the refrigerator or dryer are often the warmest places in the home.

Humidity - Habanero peppers are native to the Yucatan, where the air is hot and humid. To raise the humidity inside the seed-starting tray, either use a plastic lid or cover the tray with plastic wrap. Opening the lid for a few minutes every day allows the air to circulate inside the tray. If the planting mix looks dry, mist with warm water before closing the lid. After the seedlings emerge from the planting mix, remove the lid and place, the seed-starting tray in a brightly lit location.

Transplanting - When the seedlings are 2 to 4 inches tall and have two to four sets of leaves, they are ready to be transplanted into 4-inch pots. The habanero seedlings should be watered when the soil is dry to the touch and fertilized weekly with a half-strength 10-10-10 liquid fertilizer. When all chance of frost has passed and the soil temperatures are consistently above 65 degrees, transplant the seedlings into the garden or large outdoor planters.
JerryHaskins is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:04 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2017 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★