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Old July 15, 2016   #16
GrowingCoastal
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If it is available try some purple asparagus too. It is sweeter than the green and seems to grow just as well.
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Old July 15, 2016   #17
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White asparagus is actually green asparagus that has been grown in the absence of sunlight by covering them with soil or plastic domes so they remain a pale white iridescent color. They can range from micro to jumbo in size. White asparagus contains no chlorophyll because sunlight is required to produce the chlorophyll that makes them green and has less nutritional value than green or purple asparagus. It has a mild flavor, sometimes likened to that of sweet baby artichokes, cooks quickly and can be found on the menu of gourmet restaurants. Because white asparagus requires much time and labor to produce it is very expensive!

Purple asparagus, not surprisingly, is purple in color and grows to be only 2-3 inches in height. The spears have bright purple color with a green interior. Unlike the more commonly enjoyed green variety, purple asparagus is almost fibrous free and some say are best enjoyed raw. They cook quickly, have a fruity flavor and provide the additional health-promoting benefits derived from the phytonutrients called anthocynanins that give it its purple color. The purple color will disappear with prolonged cooking, but if cooked quickly will add some extra color, as well as extra nutrition, to your meal.

Green asparagus is the variety we most often enjoy and is most commonly found in your local market. It grows up to 8 inches in height and older thicker stems can be very fibrous and are usually removed before cooking. They are delicately flavored, easy to prepare and a springtime favorite.

*********

Is purple short? Saw some purple crown been hawked under title of purple passion. Have no aversion to any color, but primarily just want male cultivators. Female makes things weedy from what I've read......
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Old July 15, 2016   #18
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It doesn't have to be short.
And as with many crops like this and okra it has a lot to do with growth rate as to how woody it will be at a certain size.
You can look at pictures on the internet to see many of these.
Bamboo is another one that is good.
You keep it under control by eating it.

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Old July 15, 2016   #19
My Foot Smells
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last time I grew okra, I had to cut it down with a chainsaw - loves the august heat, bout the only thing on the planet that does. I planted the okra in a 2 gallon bucket, cut the bottom off, and set it on top of the surfaced scratched clay ground and treated it like a step child. it was maybe 100 ft from a water source, and when it started to wilt, I didn't rush right over - too hot to lug hose. It loved the abuse....

I've actually never heard of purple being short, but been doing some reading and a couple articles state it's stature. Given that this will be a dedicated bed, with a hopeful long history, want to make sure to do it right from the beginning. it is always easier to "experiment" with an annual, as next year rolls around pretty quickly.

However, I'm not really sure either. Most articles just talk about "purple" asparagus and not any varieties. I "assume" there are different varieties in purple that may perform differently. dunno....
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Old July 22, 2016   #20
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I grow the purple passion under part shade. I didn't keep it control by eating it enough, now it's a jungle.
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Old July 22, 2016   #21
clkeiper
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purple asparagus grows way taller than 2-3". I pick spears that are 12-15" in height and an 1" in diameter. it is huge. I am not sure what variety would grow so poorly that anyone would be able to market it. the fern fronds grow way over 5' tall depending on how dry the Summer is.
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Old July 23, 2016   #22
GrowingCoastal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by My Foot Smells View Post
White asparagus is actually green asparagus that has been grown in the absence of sunlight by covering them with soil or plastic domes so they remain a pale white iridescent color. They can range from micro to jumbo in size. White asparagus contains no chlorophyll because sunlight is required to produce the chlorophyll that makes them green and has less nutritional value than green or purple asparagus. It has a mild flavor, sometimes likened to that of sweet baby artichokes, cooks quickly and can be found on the menu of gourmet restaurants. Because white asparagus requires much time and labor to produce it is very expensive!

Purple asparagus, not surprisingly, is purple in color and grows to be only 2-3 inches in height. The spears have bright purple color with a green interior. Unlike the more commonly enjoyed green variety, purple asparagus is almost fibrous free and some say are best enjoyed raw. They cook quickly, have a fruity flavor and provide the additional health-promoting benefits derived from the phytonutrients called anthocynanins that give it its purple color. The purple color will disappear with prolonged cooking, but if cooked quickly will add some extra color, as well as extra nutrition, to your meal.

Green asparagus is the variety we most often enjoy and is most commonly found in your local market. It grows up to 8 inches in height and older thicker stems can be very fibrous and are usually removed before cooking. They are delicately flavored, easy to prepare and a springtime favorite.

*********

Is purple short? Saw some purple crown been hawked under title of purple passion. Have no aversion to any color, but primarily just want male cultivators. Female makes things weedy from what I've read......
No, not short here. And not woody when tall enough to eat. I have since seen purple asparagus for sale in the stores - regular size.
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Old July 23, 2016   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clkeiper View Post
purple asparagus grows way taller than 2-3". I pick spears that are 12-15" in height and an 1" in diameter. it is huge. I am not sure what variety would grow so poorly that anyone would be able to market it. the fern fronds grow way over 5' tall depending on how dry the Summer is.
Mine do the same here in NE Ohio. They grow just as high as my green Jersey Kings, and are much fatter spears, and much sweeter also. The one bad thing I noticed: they (the Purple Passion ones) grow berries like there is no tomorrow.

I've now begun to prune out the stalks that are loaded with berries before they ripen, otherwise the seedlings can make one crazy, especially when you try to weed them out.
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