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Old September 4, 2016   #1
PaulF
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Default cabbage question

Our grandsons planted a long row of cabbages this spring and we thinned them back to about twenty heads. We are not much on eating cabbage so they have been growing all summer long. They really look good, so today I harvested a couple to put in a roast beef with potatoes and carrots.

I ate a leaf raw and it seemed to be bitter. Is this normal or will it be OK as it cooks? If we leave the plants in the garden until we use them will they be OK? Or should we pick and give away what we don't use? Does cabbage get bitter as it stays in the ground?
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Old September 4, 2016   #2
Worth1
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I think but I am not for sure that cabbage is better in cooler weather.
If I had that much cabbage I would make sauerkraut.

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Old September 4, 2016   #3
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Good idea. Then I could have kraut on my bratwurst.
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Old September 4, 2016   #4
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You can also make cabbage rolls and freeze them. My DW cuts the heads into ~2" chunks and vacuum seals them for cooking later. Most garden cabbage is not real sweet, depending on the variety grown. If you don't freeze it, then it will not store for long. A couple of years ago, I tried keeping a 4 pound head in the fridge to see how long it would last. After about 5 weeks, it was no longer on the menu.

Any kind of pickling processing is good. Besides the kraut, you can make chow chow that goes well with a lot of meals (beans, greens, etc) as a relish-like condiment. Folks around here make a lot of Chow Chow. If you're not familiar with making it, recipes are all over the internet. Seems like every community has their own version of how to make it.
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Old September 4, 2016   #5
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I disagree about not storing well. I have 2 heads of cabbage in the crisper drawer that I harvested in the spring and they are still good.

Cabbage can definitely get "old" tasting in the garden. Sometimes the heads will split and the inside will have some grayish areas but I don't remember if they were bitter tasting.

Shred some of it and try it sauteed with butter and seasonings. It is really good.
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Old September 4, 2016   #6
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I have had cabbage from the store last for a coons age in the one refrigerator but you never know from one time to the next what will happen.

If you want to make Sauerkraut try putting about an once of dill seeds or a small bottle 0.85 I think per 15 liters of cabbage it is to die for.

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Old September 4, 2016   #7
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I've never had bitter cabbage. We eat a lot of it too, it is a staple crop for us. I usually plant two crops of it, and start using it as soon as it is firm, and finish when I dig down in the snow to recover a head. Older heads of cabbage actually taste sweet to me, and is prized by us for late season vegetable soup!
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Old September 4, 2016   #8
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That's interesting especially in your climate, Hellmann's. It was an amazing year for cabbage here. My partner and I almost drew straws for the early heads, and then we both quickly ignored the remaining heads when the weather turned hot, assuming they were tough/bitter. I grew several varieties with different maturities and some were huge. My favorite looking cabbage was a pointy savoy type that was greener than the other varieties. Partner picked that one so I can't review but will grow more next year. Last year something ate them and we didn't get much edible crop.


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Old September 4, 2016   #9
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The bugs ate mine to the ground.
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Old September 4, 2016   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
The bugs ate mine to the ground.
Any idea what bug it was?
Did you see (white) cabbage moths?

This part of the garden is fenced and huge chunks were eaten .

- Lisa
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Old September 4, 2016   #11
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I have no idea they were skeletonised.
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Old September 4, 2016   #12
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Slugs.
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Old September 5, 2016   #13
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Quote:
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Slugs.
May be I dont know it was Chinese cabbage.
Worst year ever due to the rain.
Then all of my lettuce bolted and my radishes didn't do with a hoot.
I am about ready to plant the fall garden if the stinking rain stops.
Snail and slugtropolis all summer long.
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Old September 5, 2016   #14
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Yes, much better in cool weather, specially after light frost
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Old September 5, 2016   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
That's interesting especially in your climate, Hellmann's. It was an amazing year for cabbage here. My partner and I almost drew straws for the early heads, and then we both quickly ignored the remaining heads when the weather turned hot, assuming they were tough/bitter. I grew several varieties with different maturities and some were huge. My favorite looking cabbage was a pointy savoy type that was greener than the other varieties. Partner picked that one so I can't review but will grow more next year. Last year something ate them and we didn't get much edible crop.


- Lisa
Lisa,
I've grown many varieties over the years, but settled on a variety called Morris 15 or so years ago for its flavor, size, and holding ability. Morris was discontinued and replaced by a variety called Artost a few years back, and I have grown it since. Artost is just as good in my opinion, and will hold forever in the field. Cabbage loopers are the major pest of Cole crops here, followed by flea beetles and Harlequin bugs in that order. Artost is an f1, and available at Seedway, if you would like to give it a try.
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