Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Information and discussion regarding garden diseases, insects and other unwelcome critters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 17, 2019   #1
MuddyBuckets
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern USA 7b
Posts: 81
Default Aphid Control Help Needed

Wow, all of my healthy starts of peppers, tomatoes, okra and squash have aphids. I have rinsed the leaves and sprayed with insecticidal soap and rinsed the next day but they seem to be multiplying. Plants look healthy but it is a continual battle since they have another 3 weeks under the lights.

Any of my fellow gardeners have suggestions to get rid of the aphids or at least control them? Is a Neem oil spray a good control or a pure soap solution better?

HELP!
MuddyBuckets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17, 2019   #2
biscuitridge
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: washington
Posts: 166
Default

Need oil works great,I spray every other day ,for a total of 3 sprays,seems to do an excellent job.
biscuitridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 18, 2019   #3
MuddyBuckets
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern USA 7b
Posts: 81
Default

What brand or mix do you use? There is a lot of product on the market, some just neem oil, some pre-mixed and some ready to spray.
MuddyBuckets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 18, 2019   #4
biscuitridge
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: washington
Posts: 166
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MuddyBuckets View Post
What brand or mix do you use? There is a lot of product on the market, some just neem oil, some pre-mixed and some ready to spray.
It's usually less expensive to get the pure stuff and mix it yourself, I buy it by the gallon,it will last me forever. Aphids or any insect pest for that matter is a sure sign that you have an unhealthy plant,sick plants put out a certain frequency that's different from healthy plants, in that way they call the insects to come and attack it in order to eliminate that plant,so in effect those pests are garbage collectors that are helping in getting rid of diseased or sick plants,nature has wonderful ways of dealing with issues.
biscuitridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 18, 2019   #5
PlainJane
Tomatovillian™
 
PlainJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: North Florida
Posts: 656
Default

I keep Seabright Labs sticky traps hung around the garden and supplement with neem spray if necessary. So far this spring I have not had to use neem, knock on wood. I’ve also been quite happy to see lady bugs and green lacewings around...
- Joyce
PlainJane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 18, 2019   #6
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,077
Default

Let me know if you succeed with neem. I found I still have some, when I tidied up the plant ferts area. The one I have is plain neem oil, and you had to soak the bottle in warm water so it would 'melt' and be runny enough to mix it up - of course the label is long gone.


I had a huge aphid infestation on my late season carrots-in-greenhouse experiment... I got busy and did not even try to deal with it until season was over, what a mess! I sprinkled baking soda in the end, to kill those that were still moving around when the plants were removed. Definitely worked, but I suspect there are still some lurking in the greenhouse 'overwintering' style...


I don't consider aphids a sign of ill health on indoor plants. If plant health was the problem, there would still be aphids after putting them outdoors, but instead the beneficials and improved air circulation clean them right up in a jiffy. The big problem with indoor environments is when pests get in but predators don't. Ants bring the aphids, so as long as ants can get into your home or greenhouse, there will be recurring problems. We tried to re-seal all the windows last year but only succeeded in one window where I usually start my plants. So I have three pepper plants that came through the year without aphids, and have kept them going. They aren't looking the healthiest and need to be re-potted, but no aphids on em yet.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 18, 2019   #7
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,191
Default

Not sure how people use the neem, but it's best to use an emulsifier to mix it with water (like soap). If it's actually better than a common oil however, is debatable to me. What you need to do is have a decent concentration, otherwise it's kinda for nothing. You need at least 3%, preferably 4-5, and about 90% will die in one application.
Having to do it inside sure doesn't sound like fun though. How did they get there? Are you overwintering peppers?
zipcode is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #8
MuddyBuckets
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern USA 7b
Posts: 81
Default

You called it zipcode. I brought in 4 nice pepper plants to overwinter in the sunroom and that is where I first saw the aphids a month or so ago. I sprayed and rinsed them several times but I think the aphids had already spread to my starts. Such a challenge!
MuddyBuckets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #9
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 440
Default

I have used neem oil, dish soap, cayenne pepper mix with limited results.
I will be trying Hydrogen peroxide next, I gave up on the spray mix and have been washing the plants under warm water massaging the leaves and stems.
The mix was sticking to the leaves too much and should be rinsed, however I found that just rinsing the plants in the first place was better for the plants.
I eventually gave up on two of my pepper plants and terminated them.
I get them on my cilantro and parsley too but can cut them back and rinse.


I totally agree bower that "I don't consider aphids a sign of ill health on indoor plants"









These bastages remind me of the replicators on Stargate SG1.


SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #10
clkeiper
Tomatovillian™
 
clkeiper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 4,079
Default

Lady bugs if you can find any. I have oodles that wintered over in my lean-to greenhouse and I saw a few aphids but they have been kept under control by the ladybugs. Check if there is a host plant somewhere close by that is harboring a colony. Soapy water, sticky traps and an insectide of choice. Neem is not a quick knock down FYI. If you use it it won't be evident for a week or two. It interferes with the reproduction.
__________________
carolyn k
clkeiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #11
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 2,157
Default

The arsenal list is rather small if you keep up with it. Like Bower I have a few things
on a small shelf in my winter grow/seed starting room.

All plants coming indoors in the fall get a bath.

Yellow sticky traps let you know right away if a problem has begun.

Neem, soap, hot pepper, DE, gnattrol, mosquito dunks.

Potting up, do not use last years soil if it has ever been outside and wet.
(big box stores often have last years stock outside)

My aphid infestation was 2017. Happened so fast. First thing was a bath in the sink. Just water.
Then all the rest of the recommended methods.
AC vinegar +soap in tin cans.

In late August I start a dozen dwarf sunflowers every few weeks. Aphids love sunflowers,
even the small seedlings. Mice will go after sunflowers above anything else. Now I keep a
couple traps set at all times on a lower shelf. (only trapped 4-5 all winter but one is too
many)

Only thing purchased this year...yellow sticky traps and mouse traps.

I'm getting just a couple trapped gnats a day now so well under control.
oakley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #12
SQWIBB
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Philly
Posts: 440
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by oakley View Post
Neem, soap, hot pepper, DE, gnattrol, mosquito dunks.

Mice will go after sunflowers above anything else. Now I keep a
couple traps set at all times on a lower shelf. (only trapped 4-5 all winter but one is too
many)
.



I had to move my seeds outside.
SQWIBB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #13
AKmark
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 1,853
Default

The main error that people make when treating plants for insect control is using the same product on consecutive generations of any given insect. (That is a major NO NO). The surviving insects in the first generation adapt, and their offspring will be resilient to the treatment. Remember, Aphids give birth to pregnant Aphids.
This is very important for us commercial operators to understand, it is pounded in our heads over and over. This applies for RUP's as well as over the counter products. Most over the counter products do not work so well anymore, bugs drink it like soda.
AKmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #14
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: 25 miles southeast of Waterloo Texas.
Posts: 36,502
Default

Kerosene and mineral oil on my ornamentals.
__________________
Happy Fermenting.
I Texas.
I came into this life with a backbone and I'll leave it with one.
Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 Weeks Ago   #15
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 8,289
Default

I feel like I tried everything on my mums in the fall, and nothing worked. Pyrethrins were as good as anything. You kill what you can hit, but of course they hide under leaves. Neem did not work at all for me, maybe that was user error. I even tried a neonic systemic that is not approved for food, and it didn't work. That stuff is so toxic, I read the label, and felt like it said, "You had better make out your will if you are going to expose yourself to this stuff."
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
aphid , control , insecticidal soap , neem oil , peppers

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:11 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★