Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 16, 2020   #1
Dark Rumor
Tomatovillian™
 
Dark Rumor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Southeast Texas
Posts: 217
Default Changing soil in Earth Boxes & Raised Beds??

How often do you change the soil in your earth boxes and raised beds?

I use peat moss, pine bark, perlite, vermiculite and compost in my raised beds and plant tomatoes year after year in the beds, when should the soil be changed to avoid problems like RKN?

I use peat moss, perlite and vermiculite in my earth boxes, does anyone change the soil in their earth boxes, if so how often? Has anyone ever had RKN or other pests/diseases in their earth box because of growing tomatoes year after year?
Dark Rumor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2020   #2
JosephineRose
Tomatovillian™
 
JosephineRose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: California
Posts: 376
Default

Yes, Tomato Russet Mite. It is vicious, it overwinters and unless I change the soil, it wipes out my tomatoes.

Having said that, if you don't have that particular pest, it isn't as much of a problem.

You can solarize to sterilize the soil in the EB to kill it, but the warm, sunny period I would need to do that is the same time I need to use the box. I know Marsha grew all winter so she would solarize for 6-8 weeks or so in the summer and that would solve it for her.

The dilemma is, the fresh soil has not broken down the lime yet, so I invariably get BER with the refreshed boxes. I go with it because it is the lesser of two evils, really.
JosephineRose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 22, 2020   #3
Dark Rumor
Tomatovillian™
 
Dark Rumor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Southeast Texas
Posts: 217
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JosephineRose View Post
Yes, Tomato Russet Mite. It is vicious, it overwinters and unless I change the soil, it wipes out my tomatoes.

Having said that, if you don't have that particular pest, it isn't as much of a problem.

You can solarize to sterilize the soil in the EB to kill it, but the warm, sunny period I would need to do that is the same time I need to use the box. I know Marsha grew all winter so she would solarize for 6-8 weeks or so in the summer and that would solve it for her.

The dilemma is, the fresh soil has not broken down the lime yet, so I invariably get BER with the refreshed boxes. I go with it because it is the lesser of two evils, really.
I do not think the tomato mite is around here. I have used my earth boxes for more than 3 years, I just wonder if a problem lies ahead. Thanks for the comments.
Dark Rumor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 18, 2020   #4
Hudson_WY
Tomatovillian™
 
Hudson_WY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Smoot, Wyoming
Posts: 517
Default

It was recommended to me by a Soil Testing Laboratory that rather than replacing the soil in the entire bed - instead - dig a deeper and wider planting well every year when planting the seedling (removing what you dig out) and plant the seedling in fresh potting soil. Over time, the bed is replenished. My beds are 15 years old and producing outstanding healthy plants year after year using this method!
Hudson_WY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 20, 2020   #5
Rosine
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Germany
Posts: 3
Default

I did not change it for 5 years.
I put mulching things on top in summer when I have them. In spring they get compost on top and occasionally when I walk by and have a handfull form another project.
I did not have disease, so no need to change that.
When the pot is too full I remove a bit earth and put compost.

The pots are big and heavy, I do not want to remove earth.
Rosine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 20, 2020   #6
Dark Rumor
Tomatovillian™
 
Dark Rumor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Southeast Texas
Posts: 217
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson_WY View Post
It was recommended to me by a Soil Testing Laboratory that rather than replacing the soil in the entire bed - instead - dig a deeper and wider planting well every year when planting the seedling (removing what you dig out) and plant the seedling in fresh potting soil. Over time, the bed is replenished. My beds are 15 years old and producing outstanding healthy plants year after year using this method!
Makes sense, hope I can remember that next year
Dark Rumor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 22, 2020   #7
Father'sDaughter
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MA/NH Border
Posts: 4,850
Default

I just keep adding several inches leaf mulch to the top of my raised beds and top that off with a couple of inches of well shredded dry leaves every fall. In the spring I plant through the mulch. I actually stopped turning them several years back.
Father'sDaughter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 1, 2020   #8
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,316
Default

In my raised beds I never change the soil. I add to it every year.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 3, 2020   #9
zipcode
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Romania/Germany , z 4-6
Posts: 1,361
Default

Not sure raised beds would be much protection against RKN, at least not for long.
In containers, as long as one is careful, I think you can use the same medium for a few good years. The time will be probably decided by how compact it gets, after 2-4 years, depending with what you started, it decomposes to finer particles and becomes increasingly less aerated.
zipcode is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:23 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★