Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating all other edible garden plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 28, 2009   #46
duajones
Tomatovillian™
 
duajones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Corpus Christi,Texas Z9
Posts: 1,996
Default

Here they are 2 weeks later, pulling 5 or 6 pods a day now
Attached Images
File Type: jpg okra062809.JPG (222.1 KB, 21 views)
__________________
Duane Jones
duajones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 16, 2010   #47
bboomer
Tomatovillian™
 
bboomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 67
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by duajones View Post
I have grown Clemson Spineless, Emerald and Louisianna Green Velvet. Taste wise I prefer the LGV but this year I am growing the CS again since I already have seeds. In 2007, my CS plants were over 10ft tall and I was using a step ladder to harvest.

Holy Cow!!! Your plants do look like trees! Has anyone in the midwest even gotten close to growing beauties like these??
bboomer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2010   #48
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,986
Default

As to transplanting okra, they transplant very good. I start mine in egg cartons with potting soil; one seed per egg cup. When they get 5 or so inches tall I pot up to regular styrofoam coffee cups and when the temps are warm enough outside I transplant with each one about 2 feet apart. One year it was late getting warm and the plants were well over a foot tall and fairly root bound; but it didn't slow them down when they were put in the garden. I like to wait until the nights are in the 70's and the days well up in the 80's. Okra is a heavy feeder and needs a high amount of nitrogen when it is really pumping out the pods. I have also grown monstrous plants that required constant harvesting. Not so much anymore.
I now grow only two types that don't produce quite as many pods but the pods get huge before they get tough. One is called Cow Horn; it produces pods that are usually tender until they get 6 inches long and if left alone they will get well over a foot long. I have picked many 8 inches long that are still as tender as a 2" Clemson or other small pod variety.
The other is called Becks and it produces very fat pods that are fantastic for frying.The Becks is not as prolific as the Cow Horn but it only takes a couple of pods per person.
I have had the Becks get as big as a beer can and still be tender enough to cook but it's best to pick them when they are about as big around as a golf ball.
It now only takes a minute or two to pick around 2 dozen plants. When I used to grow some of the smaller pod varieties like Clemson it was a maddening job finding all of the little pods on the huge bushy plants and it took much longer to pick them. I rarely miss a pod large enough to pick anymore even when the plants are huge and it sure takes less time to prepare them for cooking.
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 18, 2010   #49
DuckCreekFarms
Tomatovillian™
 
DuckCreekFarms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma
Posts: 257
Default

B54Red

I see two becks (Okra) listed
Beck's Gardenville And Beck's Big Buckhorn, which one do you think you have as i would like to order some. I love Lousiana short becaus it's a great frying okra, but the becks intrigue me

thanks
gary
DuckCreekFarms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2010   #50
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 6,986
Default

The seed pack says 'Becks Big Buck' and I got them from Gourmet Seed International. If I had the room it is the only one I would grow; but since it doesn't produce as heavily as Cow Horn I have to grow both because I love to make gumbo when I have plenty of okra. here is the link

http://www.gourmetseed.com/category/...ble_seed.okra/


Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckCreekFarms View Post
B54Red

I see two becks (Okra) listed
Beck's Gardenville And Beck's Big Buckhorn, which one do you think you have as i would like to order some. I love Lousiana short becaus it's a great frying okra, but the becks intrigue me

thanks
gary
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2010   #51
duajones
Tomatovillian™
 
duajones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Corpus Christi,Texas Z9
Posts: 1,996
Default

Transplanting ended up working well for me last year. I harvested over a hundred pods per plant up until August. I had a death in the family and just quit harvesting or watering the plants and they died. They were well on their way to averaging 150 pods per plant and 10 ft tall or better.
This year I plan to grow Emerald for the second time
__________________
Duane Jones
duajones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2010   #52
DuckCreekFarms
Tomatovillian™
 
DuckCreekFarms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma
Posts: 257
Default

I posted this link last year but will repost for those that might have missed it.

http://www.kerrcenter.com/publications/heirloom-okra-report.pdf

I will be working with the kerr Center this year on a sweet potato trial

gary

Last edited by DuckCreekFarms; February 19, 2010 at 11:32 AM. Reason: leftout info
DuckCreekFarms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2010   #53
recruiterg
Tomatovillian™
 
recruiterg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Edina, MN (Zone 4)
Posts: 945
Default

What does "spineless" as in Clemson Spineless refer to? Does the plant have spines/thorns? I have never seen an Okra plant and thought it might be fun to try. Would it grow in Zone 4?
recruiterg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 19, 2010   #54
DuckCreekFarms
Tomatovillian™
 
DuckCreekFarms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma
Posts: 257
Default

Believe me... you would know if it wasn't spinless. I had one variety (dont remember which one) that you had to use gloves casue it was like picking prickly pear
DuckCreekFarms is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:23 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★