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Old April 13, 2012   #31
livinonfaith
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Yes, that is fascinating about the bitter gene! I love most greens raw or cooked any way, especially sauteed. So does my son. He will eat a quarter of a cabbage before you can get it in the pan if you'll let him!

On the other hand, my son likes cilantro, and I don't. Besides licorice, it is the only herb that I really don't like. A little doesn't bother me too much but, recently I've started asking when ordering in restaurants because some chefs throw fresh cilantro all over everything. Apparently, it's the "in" herb these days. Ick!

For me, beet greens win over chard. (so far, I'm trying a new chard this year)

Real spinach wins over Malabar spinach. (Malabar has a mucilaginous texture to me. But I didn't try it sauteed, so it might be better that way)

Cabbage usually wins over Kale (but I'm trying three different kinds of kale this year that are supposed to be good)

Turnip greens and collards are close. Sometimes I prefer one, sometimes the other. Both are fantastic with a little vinegar or, better yet, a scoop of homemade Chow Chow.
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Old April 13, 2012   #32
Tracydr
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I'm trying the malabar and new Zealand spinach for the first time this summer. Also trying some more green appropriate amaranth varieties.
Working at getting more greens in our diet. Had a spinach omelette for breakfast. The red leaf spinach I grew this year from Pinetree is fantastic, really grew well compared to any other spinach I've tried, too. It's even good when it's gone to seed!
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Old April 14, 2012   #33
livinonfaith
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Well, the Malabar spinach grew like crazy for me! I had two tomato cages and planted four seeds around the base of each one. They were very attractive plants that easily filled up each tomato cage, jumped to the nearby fence and then soared out a couple of feet into the air.

For some reason that year I just wasn't in the mood to experiment with it. Once I found out that I didn't like it fresh, (strange texture) I meant to try it sauteed, but for some reason, never did. I think that might be the ticket for this green. That or to add color and thickness to soups.
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Old April 16, 2012   #34
texasrockgarden
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Here are a few pictures of beets I pulled this morning. My helper, Ms Pretty, and I will spend the rest of the afternoon pickling them.

This is a mixture of Red Ace, Kestrel and Pacemaker lll that were sown the middle of January. I buy my seeds from Twilley. The seeds are decorticated meaning they have been sized or separated for planters/seeders. Three seedlings are about the most that germinate from one beet seed cluster. I plant 6" in all directions and they all mature to full size without thinning.

I made a mistake this year because I planted the beets beside Chinese cabbage. The beets require more water than the Chinese cabbage and as a result the cabbage rotted. Won't do that again!

Edit: This mess of beets made 7 pints of pickled beets. added one more photo.
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File Type: jpg IMG_4917.JPG (72.2 KB, 32 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_4918.JPG (69.5 KB, 31 views)
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File Type: jpg IMG_4933.JPG (51.0 KB, 19 views)

Last edited by texasrockgarden; April 16, 2012 at 11:14 PM. Reason: Update post and add photo.
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Old April 16, 2012   #35
janezee
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I was out checking everything under my long cloche yesterday,
and I have beets that I started in there on January 5th, I think.
They're about half the size of those above. I'm letting them stay
in the ground until it's time for the tomatoes to take their place.
Just another experiment whose outcome I really like.
Time to plant more! I really can't grow enough beets.
Mom and neighbors look forward to dinner at my house,
since they don't grow them. I might have to change that
for mom, at least!

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Old April 16, 2012   #36
Tracydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by livinonfaith View Post
Well, the Malabar spinach grew like crazy for me! I had two tomato cages and planted four seeds around the base of each one. They were very attractive plants that easily filled up each tomato cage, jumped to the nearby fence and then soared out a couple of feet into the air.

For some reason that year I just wasn't in the mood to experiment with it. Once I found out that I didn't like it fresh, (strange texture) I meant to try it sauteed, but for some reason, never did. I think that might be the ticket for this green. That or to add color and thickness to soups.
I'm thinking soups will be good, kind of like okra.
I've hear New Zealand spinach is better? I don't know.
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Old April 17, 2012   #37
livinonfaith
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Tracy, maybe it would be good as a thickener in a gumbo type dish, the same way okra is. I'm not sure what the texture does when cooked.

I don't know why I didn't use it that year. There was certainly enough of it. (So pretty!) Part of me wonders if just a quick saute with some olive oil, a bit of garlic and some sea salt might do the trick, kind of change the texture. Heck, you may love the texture just the way it is!

How did you like the Amaranth? Some of the varieties are so pretty in the garden and if it tasted good, that would be a fantastic bonus. Have you tried roasting the seeds for grain?
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Old April 17, 2012   #38
Rockporter
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My understanding of Malabar Spinach is you have to harvest it very young or it doesn't taste very good. They say you want to keep picking the seeds off of the vines as they are growing as well or it will take off like mint does. They say if you cut it when the vine is about 2' tall or so and use them in salad or cooking that the taste is milder. They also say that cooking the spinach takes the mucuous like texture out of it. They(the persons I got the seed from) said they eat it very young and in salads.
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Old April 22, 2012   #39
Doug9345
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I'm one of those people that tolerate greens only in moderation. I find Brussel sprouts so bitter that it is impossible to swallow. I prefer wax beans to green beans, cauliflower over broccoli. I do eat some greens because they are good for me and I don't find them too bad. I like lettuce in moderation although I'd never describe it as sweet.
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