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Old January 2, 2010   #1
Medbury Gardens
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Default kohlrabi recipes

I've grown a excellent crop of kohlrabi this season and would be interested to hear if anyone has some recipes.
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Old January 2, 2010   #2
mjc
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One way I've seen it done is grated and turned into slaw...a vinegar dressing slaw as opposed to a crealy type. Basically any cabbage slaw recipe substituting grated kohlrabi for the cabbage.

This one sounds good...

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/rec...abi84573.shtml
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Old January 2, 2010   #3
Wi-sunflower
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I usually tell customers that are new to Kohlrabi to think of them like a moist potato. Kind of like a cross between a potato and a turnip, but without the strong taste of the turnip.

Peal it, then cube it. I usually like to put the cubes in a microwave safe dish and cover with stretch wrap. Cook til fork tender. Drain any liquid that may have come out of them. (shouldn't be much)

Then do anything you would do with potatoes. Just butter. Mash. Or my favorite cover with a "cream sauce", that for me usually means dump a can of cream of mushroon soup over and heat up.

Hubby likes to make a mixed root crop dish. Cube up Kohlrabi, carrots, potatoes, turnips, rutabega, parsnips, whatever you have around. Cook and then butter and/or mash.

A couple of them are a bit too strong for my taste, but it is good anyway.

BTW, Kohlrabi is good raw too. Just peal and eat. Has the crunch and texture of a hard apple but a mildly cabbage taste.

Carol
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Old January 2, 2010   #4
Zana
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Kohlrabi Puree

Instead of mashed potatoes, serve this pureed kohlrabi alongside your favourite meat loaf for a delicious change of pace.

4 kohlrabi bults with leaves
1 tablespon olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup quartered small cultivated mushrooms
3 tablespoons chicken stock
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Trim and peel the kohlrabi bulbs, reserving the leaves (discard any that are yellow). Rinse the leaves, pat them dry, and coarsely chop. Set them aside. Cut the bulbs into 1-inc/2.5cm chucks.

Bring a saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil, and add the kohlrabi chunks. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a skillet. Add the onion and garlic, and sauté over medium-low heat until softened, about 5 minutes.

Add the mushrooms and the reserved kohlrabi leaves to the skillet. Cover, and cook 5 minutes. Then uncover, and cook, stirring, until al the liquid has evaporated, 3 minutes. Set the skillet aside.

Drain the kohlrabi chunks and place them in the bowl of a food processor. Add the mushroom mixture and all the remaining ingredients. Puree until smooth.

Transfer the puree to a saucepan and reheat over low heat, stirring, w minutes. (or transfer it to a baking dish and bake in a preheated 350 degree F oven until steaming hot, 25 minutes.)

Makes 6 portions.

~ from The New Basics Cookbook by Julee Rosso & Sheila Lukins

Zana’s note: I have been known to add a combination of parmesan and smoked gruyere and/or blue cheese over this when baking. Add in the last
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Old January 2, 2010   #5
Zana
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Kohlrabi Cakes

Similar to potato pancakes, these kohlrabi cakes have a bite – they’re spiked with ginger and hot red pepper. Minted Yoghurt Sauce is the refreshment contrast.

4 kohlrabi bulbs
1/4 cup chopped scallions (green onions)
2 eggs, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons dried bread-crumbs
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon dried re pepper flakes, crushed
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
1/4 cup olive oil
1 1/3 cups Minted Yoghurt Sauce

1. Peel and shred the kohlrabi bulbs. Squeeze out any excess moisture.
2. Combine the kohlrabi, scallions, eggs, bread crumbs, salt, ginger, red pepper flakes, and black pepper in a mixing bowl. Stir until well blended.
3. Heat the oil in a large skillet, and drop the mixture into it by large spoonfuls. Saute the cakes until golden, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Drain on paper towels.
4. Serve with Minted Yoghurt Sauce.

Minted Yoghurt Sauce

1 1/4 cups plain low-fat yoghurt
1/4 cup chopped fresh mint leaves
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper, to taste

• Stir all the ingredients together in a bowl until smooth.
• Refrigerate, covered, until ready to serve.

Makes 1 1/3 cups

~ from The New Basics Cookbook by Julee Rosso & Sheila Lukins
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Old January 2, 2010   #6
Medbury Gardens
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Gees its making me hungry just reading all this,must go and have some breakfast i think

Thanks everyone for your ideas
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Old January 2, 2010   #7
Zana
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Kohlrabi Gratine

The kohlrabi, a special turnip-like root vegetable much loved in ?Austira, is widely available in American markets. The following dish goes particularly well with broiled meats.

6 (6oz) kohlrabi
2 tablespoons butter, plus butter to grease the dish
1/2 cup Brown Veal Stock (or regular beef stock)
1/4 cup heavy cream
1 egg yolk
salt and freshly ground white pepper, to taste
1 garlic clove, peeled

1. Peel the kohlrabi, and cut into 1-inch/2.5cm thick slices.

2. Heat the 2 tablespoons of butter in a skillet and sauté the kohlrabi for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the veal stock and simmer, uncovered, until the kohlrabi is partially done, about 25 minutes.

3. Butter an au gratin dish and preheat the broiler.

4. Beat the cream and egg yolk together and add to the kohlrabi. Reduce over a low flame for 5 minutes, to a sauce consistency. Remove from the heat and season with salt and pepper to taste.

5. Add garlic clove, return to a simmer, and cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Remove garlic.

6. Remove from the heat and transfer to the au gratin dish. Place under the broiler until browned and bubbly. Serve in the au gratin dish.

Serves 6

~ from Viennese Cuisine: The New Approach by Peter Grunauer and Andreas Kisler with Donald Flanell Friedman

Zana’s Notes:
• I tend to be a garlic fiend(what Armenian isn't?...lol), so I mash or puree up at least 3 cloves of garlic to add to the sauce. I don’t remove them.
• I’ve also added hot peppers and/or hot pepper flakes to the sauce.
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Old January 2, 2010   #8
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Baked Stuffed Kohlrabi

4 medium unblemished potatoes of relatively equal size
salt and cayenne pepper
1/4 pint / 1.5dl heavy cream or drained unsweetened yoghurt
1 egg
6 oz. / 170g Cheddar, freshly grated
2 oz. / 55 g butter

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees C / 350 degrees F / gas mark 4 , or 200 degrees C / 400 degrees F / gas mark 6, depending on how much time you have.

Trim, scrub and ♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫ the kohlrabi, roll them in salt and bake them for an hour and 30 minutes at the lower setting or an hour at the higher setting.

Turn the oven up to 220 degrees C / 425 degrees F / gas mark 7.

Take out the kohlrabi, cut them in half and turn out the middles into a bowl, forking them out lightly rather than scooping them out with a spoon. (Zana’s Note: However, I have had to use a spoon too upon occasion – so whatever works best for you.) Keep the skins. Bring the cream/yoghurt to the boil and pour it into the kohlrabi flesh, whishing ti in with a fork until you have a smooth puree. Beat in the egg, cheese and butter and season with salt and cayenne pepper. Pile the mixture back into the skins, and bake for 15 minutes until brown.

Alternatives: sour cream and chives, bacon pieces, chopped ham or grilled mushrooms can all be added to the kohlrabi filling in place of the cheese or in addition to it. For a crispy finish, sprinkle the stuffed kohlrabi with breadcrumbs before returning them to the oven.

~ this was adapted from a recipe for Baked Stuffed Potatoes from The Cookbook by Terrence and Caroline Conran.

Zana’s Notes:
I’ve added the following alternatives too: smoked salmon and dill; candied ginger and slivers of hot peppers; blue cheeses, smoked cheeses, or combinations of cheeses; Dijon mustard; horseradish or wasabi horseradish.
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Old January 2, 2010   #9
Zana
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Kohlrabi a la Paysanne

Cut the kohlrabi into slices.
Brown in lard (Zana's Note: or butter or olive oil) in which some chopped onion has been softened.
Add some fresh breast of pork and season with salt.
Moisten with white wine and stock in equal proportions.
Cook in the oven.

~ from the New Larousse Gastronomique (1977 English edition)
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Old January 2, 2010   #10
Medbury Gardens
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Thanks again Zana,i like the sound of that recipe that has the butter ,egg yolk and heavy cream in it now that the consumption of saturated fats and cholesterol is now healthy again for us.
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Old January 2, 2010   #11
Zana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Medbury Gardens View Post
Thanks again Zana,i like the sound of that recipe that has the butter ,egg yolk and heavy cream in it now that the consumption of saturated fats and cholesterol is now healthy again for us.
Richard,

What's not to like? LOL...have to admit it goes with all the heavy food that we tend to get around this time of year in the NH. A bit heavy for you lot in the SH in the heat, I should think. But it is definitely yummmmmmmy!

Zana

ps - and yeah...now that they're healthy again
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Old January 2, 2010   #12
Medbury Gardens
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My comment about saturated fats and cholesterol being healthy again was in relation to a documentary i saw on TV the other day name "Fathead",a real eye opener,have you seen it??
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Old January 2, 2010   #13
Zana
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Richard, since we're talking "healthy" stuff now....here ya go.....

Creamed Kohlrabi

6 kohlrabi
boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
paprika
1 egg yolk
2 cups thin white sauce

Pare kohlrabi and cut into cubes or slices. Let stand in mixture of cold water and 2 tablespoons vinegar for 1 hour. Rinse.

Cook uncovered in boiling salted water 20 to 35 minutes. (Makes about 4 cups cooked.)

Drain.

Add paprika and egg yolk to white sauce and pour over kohlrabi.

Serves 6

White Sauces
Thin White Sauce (for cream soups)

1 tablespoon butter or other fat
1 tablespoon flour
1 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Medium White Sauce (for graves, sauces, creamed and scalloped dishes)

2 tablespoons butter or other fat
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Thick White Sauce (for cutlets, croquettes and souffles)

4 tablespoons butter or other fat
4 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

(Zana's note: I prefer to use a "half and half cream" rather than milk since there is less lactose and it gives more body to the sauce. You could also substitute a heavy cream too.)



Method 1 - Melt butter, blend in flour until smooth. Add milk gradually, stirring constantly until boiling point is reached. Reduce heat and cook for 3 minutes longer; add seasonsings and blend. Place over hot water to keep hot and cover tightly to prevent film from forming.

Method 2 - Heat milk. Blend butter or other fat and flour together and add to hot milk, stirring contantly until mixture thickens. Cook for 3 minutes longer, add seasonings and blend.

Variations on White Sauce

Use 1 cup medium white sauce as the basis for each sauce.

Caper Sauce - Add 2 to 4 tablespoons chopped capers.

Celery Sauce - Add 1/2 cup chopped cooked celery.

Cheese Sauce - Add 2 to 4 ounces grated cheese. Set over hot water and stir until cheese is blended with sauce. Season to taste with mustard and paprika.

Cream Gravy - Use 2 tablespoons meat drippings for butter in white sauce recipe.

Cream Sauce - Use cream instead of milk in white sauce.

Egg Sauce, No. 1 - Add 1 hard-cooked egg, chopped.

Egg Sauce, No. 2 - Beat an uncooked egg, dilute with 1 tablespoon of hot thin white sauce, then beat this into the remainder of a cup of sauce. If the egg white is beaten separately, the sauce will be foamy.

Lobster Sauce - Add 1/2 cup finely flaked cooked lobster.

Mock Hollandaise Sauce - Pour sauce over 2 slightly beaten egg yolks, 2 tablespoons each of butter and lemon juice, beat thoroughly and serve immediately.

Olive Sauce - Add 1/4 cup chopped ripe or stuffed olives.

Oyster Sauce - Heat 1 pint small oysters in their own liquor to boiling point. Remove from heat after they have cooked 1/2 minute and combine with sauce. Season to taste.

Parsley Sauce - Add 2 to 4 tablespoons chopped parsley.

Pimiento Sauce - Add 2 tablespoons minced onion and 6 tablespoons minced pimiento. Onion may be browned in fat when making white sauce, if desired.

Shrimp Sauce - Add 1/2 cup chopped cooked shrimp.

Soubise Sauce - Rub 4 boiled onions and 2 sprigs parsley through a coarse sieve. Combine with sauce.

Tomato Cream Sauce - Cook 1 cup fresh or canned tomatoes (Zana's Note: I have found that I now prefer to use black tomatoes for this, as they give a deep, smokey flavour to the sauce.), 1 stalk celery, 1 slice onion, 1/2 teaspoon salt and a few grains cayenne together for 20 minutes. Rub through a sieve. Add gradually, stirring constantly, to white sauce.

Veloute Sauce - Use 1 cup well-seasoned white stock for milk in thin or medium white sauce.

Yellow Sauce - Add hot sauce to 1 to 2 slightly beaten egg yolks and beat thoroughly.



All the above from The American Women's Cook Book, edited and revised by Ruth Berolzheimer. Published by The Culinary Arts Institute, Chicago, 1956.

Last edited by Zana; January 2, 2010 at 07:38 PM. Reason: added "credit" for source of recipes
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Old January 2, 2010   #14
Zana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Medbury Gardens View Post
My comment about saturated fats and cholesterol being healthy again was in relation to a documentary i saw on TV the other day name "Fathead",a real eye opener,have you seen it??
Haven't seen that one, but have been looking at allot of stuff online and in print, as I have high cholesterol. Sheeeeeeeeesh...what a pain in the arse!
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Old January 2, 2010   #15
Zana
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Oh yeah....another version of the white sauce -

Add grated nutmeg to it and pour over steamed or roasted kohlrabi.
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