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Old January 3, 2010   #31
Zana
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German-Style Stuffed Kohlrabi

Gourmet | October 1992
Yield: Serves 4 to 8

8 kohlrabies (about 5 pounds), bulbs peeled, stems discarded, and the leaves trimmed of tough center ribs
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1 garlic clove, chopped fine
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter
1 pound ground pork
1/2 cup cooked long-grain rice
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley leaves plus additional for garnish if desired

2 tablespoons sweet paprika
1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram, crumbled
1/4 teaspoon caraway seeds
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 large eggs, beaten lightly
3 1/2 cups chicken broth
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 cup heavy cream

Trim 1/4 inch from the root end of each kohlrabi bulb so the bulb will stand upright, scoop out the pulp from the opposite end with a small melon-ball cutter or spoon, leaving 1/4-inch-thick shells, and chop it fine (there will be about 2 3/4 cups). In a large kettle of boiling salted water cook the kohlrabi leaves for 3 minutes, or until they are just tender, drain them well, and chop them fine (there will be about 2 cups).

In a large skillet cook the onion and the garlic in 2 tablespoons of the butter over moderate heat, stirring, until the onion is golden and transfer the mixture to a large bowl. To the bowl add the pork, the rice, 2 tablespoons of the parsley, the paprika, the marjoram, the caraway seeds, the tomato paste, the eggs, 1/2 cup of the kohlrabi pulp, 1/4 cup of the chopped kohlrabi leaves, and salt and pepper to taste and combine the mixture well. Divide the mixture among the kohlrabi shells, mounding it, and arrange the shells in a shallow flameproof baking dish just large enough to hold them in one layer. Scatter the remaining pulp and leaves in the dish and pour in the broth. Bring the broth to a boil and simmer the shells, covered partially, for 30 to 50 minutes, or until they can be pierced easily with a sharp knife. Transfer the shells with a slotted spoon to a plate, reserving the cooking mixture in the baking dish, and keep them warm.

In a small saucepan cook the flour in the remaining 2 tablespoons butter over moderate heat, whisking, for 3 minutes and whisk in the cream. Bring the mixture to a boil, whisking, simmer it for 1 minute, and stir it into the reserved cooking mixture, a little at a time. Add salt and pepper to taste and cook the sauce over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 10 minutes, or until it is thickened. Return the stuffed shells to the baking dish and garnish them with the additional parsley.

Here are some of the reviews with alternative suggestions:

4 Forks)I love kohlrabi, my parents grow it in their garden and my mother is from Germany. I was very interested in making this recipe. I followed the recipe and we all liked the stuffing and the sauce. The only problem was the kohlrabi. I made this Labor Day weekend and my father gave me 8 huge kohlrabis. They were larger than a softball. I should have cut them down so that they would cook faster. They were thicker than a 1/4" and a bit stalky. I'm going to make this recipe again next summer earlier in the season with smaller and more tender kohlrabi. Everything else was very tasty. Actually, the sauce was so good I can see using it as the base for soup.

by A Cook from Rochester, NY on 09/09/09

3 ForksI made it vegetarian. I used textured vegetable protein in place of the ground pork, a vegetarian "chicken" broth, and soy milk instead of the cream. Very good flavor. Another variation: made it using bulgur wheat instead of rice, chopped up some seitan instead of meat, used no egg, veggie broth, and replaced the cream with soy milk. This was also very good.

by torij6 from Los Angeles on 06/11/09

4 ForksWe loved this dish! It was time consuming prepping the kohlrabi, but well worth it. I will definitely make this dish again. I used beef instead of pork, I also added extra garlic and onion. We used wonderful, freshly picked homegrown (by our friend) kohlrabi, and made it organic. Delicious!

by katelove1111 from Huntington Station, NY on 07/06/08

4 ForksWonderful flavors! The kohlrabi prep is time intensive, however. I lightly broiled the top add some extra texture. I would definitely make this recipe again.

by TheLovelySpoon on 04/09/08

4 ForksSuper delicious. Very indulgent. I made as written but would consider other reviewers lower calorie modifications such as ground turkey. I served casually alongside additional long grain rice. I also doubled the meat mixture and made rolled out meatballs and cooked them on a sheetpan. I mixed them with the remaining sauce to freeze and eat another day. Make sure to trim all the woody outer peel off the kohlrabi. Would make again but probably in the meatball form to save time.


by StayHomeChef from Indianapolis on 03/05/08

4 ForksThis is fantastic! It took awhile to make, but it's so different from anything we've ever had. Extremely flavorful and rich.

by A Cook from Minneapolis, MN on 07/30/07

4 ForksThis recipe was just FANTASTIC! My husband is german; we both love german-style food. I ended up using a large skillet on the stovetop to cook the kohlrabi. This recipe is a bit time-intensive to prep the kohlrabi, but is so worth it. Just make sure to peel the kohlrabi well so as to remove the woodsy bits. I ended up adding a little extra cream, that was the only change. We were both really pleased with this.

by mcfolly from boston, ma on 07/27/07
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Old January 3, 2010   #32
Zana
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Chicken Soup with Loads of Vegetables

Epicurious | September 1998
by Joan Nathan Jewish Cooking in America

Jewish chicken soup is usually served with thin egg noodles or with matzah balls. The zucchini is my, not MGM's addition.

Yield: Yield: about 10 servings (M)

4 quarts water
1 large cut-up chicken, preferably stewing or large roaster
Marrow bones (optional)
2 whole onions, unpeeled
4 parsnips, peeled and left whole
1/2 cup chopped celery leaves plus 2 stalks celery and their leaves

1 rutabaga, peeled and quartered
1 large turnip, peeled and quartered
1 kohlrabi, quartered (optional)
6 carrots, peeled and left whole
6 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
6 tablespoons snipped dill
1 tablespoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 zucchini

1. Put the water and the chicken in a large pot and bring the water to a boil. Skim off the froth.

2. Add the marrow bones, onions, parsnips, celery, 3/4 of the rutabaga, turnip, kohlrabi, 4 of the carrots, the parsley, 4 tablespoons of the dill, and the salt and pepper. Cover and simmer of 2 1/2 hours, adjusting the seasoning to taste.

3. Strain, remove the chicken, discard the vegetables and refrigerate the liquid to solidify. Remove the skin and bones from the chicken and cut the meat into bite-size chunks. Refrigerate. Remove the fat from the soup.

4. Just before serving, reheat the soup. Bring to a boil. Cut the zucchini and the remaining 2 carrots into thin strips and add to the soup along with the remaining rutabaga cut into thin strips as well as a few pieces of chicken. Simmer about 15 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked, but still firm. Serve with the remaining snipped dill. You can also add noodles, marrow, or clos (matzah) balls.


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Reprinted with permission from Jewish C
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Old January 4, 2010   #33
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Isn’t that the stuff we see as a pathetic garnish in some of the sleazier restaurants cleverly passing their selves off as fine eating establishments?
I never knew you could eat the stuff.
No really, I have tried it raw and found it lacking in flavor and overwhelmingly chewy with a texture and flavor somewhat like an overused poorly maintained English saddle.
Now thanks to Zana we have an abundance of fine recipes, I might just give it another go.
I wonder if it goes well with Okra.


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Old January 4, 2010   #34
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I do believe I've tossed it in some gumbo in the past.....and naturally the gumbo included okra! But I like your descriptions of the raw flavour. Rather insipid when young, and rather leather-like when older, larger specimens. Sighhhhh....lol...rather like....oh never mind....
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Old January 5, 2010   #35
Medbury Gardens
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zana View Post
Rather insipid when young, and rather leather-like when older.
Ok,so like so many other vegetables where the flavour becomes more prominent with maturity,do you think this may compensate for a more leathery texture as you have described.
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Old January 5, 2010   #36
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I should mention that there are 3 types of Kohlrabi.

1 - the old non-hybrid varieties. You better pick this type small. About tenis ball to baseball (hard ball) size. Otherwise they get woody / stringy.

2 - Hybrid normal types. Winner and Grand Duke are 2 varieties. They will grow fast and can be much larger, more like the grade school softballs before they get a bit woody near the bottom. Even when a bit over sized just cut off the bottom a bit higher up and you still have a lot of good Kohlrabi.

3 - The German "Super Smaltz" types that get huge. A neighbor farmer grows these and they can get to soccer ball size or close. I've seen them as large or larger than a big head of cabbage. They will be tender at that size but take a long growing season.

A lot of farmers still grow the non-hybrids in part because the hybrid seed are significantly more expensive. But they are more than worth it when you are selling them.

A clue to tell if it is going to be tough or tender is to look at the leaf stems on the side of the bulbs. If they look rather close together, on top of each other, it will most likely be tough. If the leaves are spaced far apart, it will be tender.

Carol
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Old January 5, 2010   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wi-sunflower View Post
I should mention that there are 3 types of Kohlrabi.

1 - the old non-hybrid varieties. You better pick this type small. About tenis ball to baseball (hard ball) size. Otherwise they get woody / stringy.

2 - Hybrid normal types. Winner and Grand Duke are 2 varieties. They will grow fast and can be much larger, more like the grade school softballs before they get a bit woody near the bottom. Even when a bit over sized just cut off the bottom a bit higher up and you still have a lot of good Kohlrabi.

3 - The German "Super Smaltz" types that get huge. A neighbor farmer grows these and they can get to soccer ball size or close. I've seen them as large or larger than a big head of cabbage. They will be tender at that size but take a long growing season.

A lot of farmers still grow the non-hybrids in part because the hybrid seed are significantly more expensive. But they are more than worth it when you are selling them.

A clue to tell if it is going to be tough or tender is to look at the leaf stems on the side of the bulbs. If they look rather close together, on top of each other, it will most likely be tough. If the leaves are spaced far apart, it will be tender.

Carol
The Kohlrabis that i'm growing this season are Early Purple Vienna, but when i did a search on it,i see that White Vienna is also included and thats exactly what i have in the garden ,some white, some purple,cant see if they are a Hybrid or not though
http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/store/ve...bi/earlypurple
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Old January 6, 2010   #38
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The Viennas are the old non-hybrid varieties.

Pick them small or they WILL be tough. About tennis ball size is their maximum size.

Carol
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Old January 6, 2010   #39
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Ok Carol,thats about size of the some first plants i planted,i've been sowing a few seeds every other week for a continual supply
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Old January 6, 2010   #40
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Richard, we have grown the Early, White and Purple Viennas and did as you, multiple sowings for a continuing supply. Last year grew the SuperSchmeltz and I think that's the way to go - even large they were not woody (although I did find it more difficult to peel them) and I still have 3 of the last ones harvested out in the almost-freezing unheated garage (it is currently -28C...). They are putting out nice fresh green leaves (which are quite edible). Will be planting one of them out next spring to see if/how to get some seeds.

By the way, think I like them raw best of all.
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Old January 6, 2010   #41
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wow -28C


SuperSchmeltz has certainly court my attention,bit late for me to grow that variety now because i would have to look overseas to get hold of the seed,but they do sound like they are an excellent winter vegetable for my climate as i could just leave them out in the garden.
Do light frosts "sweeten" the kohlrabi in the same way the Turnips are??
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Old January 6, 2010   #42
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Hmm - couldn't really say, this was the first year growing them and we started off with a darned hard freeze! Didn't seem to hurt them, though. Also didn't really notice much of a taste difference, they were not that "strong" to start with. If you would like me to send you a few dozen seeds, send a pm., just passing on the kindness of Velikipop who posts here and did the same for me. If you want a source for more seeds, they came from Territorial Seed Company.
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Old January 7, 2010   #43
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Thanks for your kind offer salix,but considering that i have only three months of growing season left its probably a bit too late now,i'll use up the last of the Early Purple Vienna seed i have and then look to next season buying superschmelz form Territrial Seeds.
i'll need to send them an email and ask if they send seed overseas,because a lot dont.
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Old January 7, 2010   #44
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Saw your message just now as I was setting out to post a correction. The seeds for Superschmeltz I have actually came from West Coast Seeds (Canada), but they are also available from Territorial (U.S.A.). Hope this helps.

If you cannot find a supplier to send to N. Z. - I can always send you a birthday card!

Last edited by salix; January 7, 2010 at 01:45 PM. Reason: addition
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