Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating all other edible garden plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old May 27, 2014   #16
BucksCountyGirl
Tomatovillian™
 
BucksCountyGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Holland, PA/Zone 7A
Posts: 692
Default

I second Tyee for the fall. It grew very well for us last year. Nothing like home grown greens!
__________________
- Kelli

Life's a climb...but the view is fantastic
BucksCountyGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2014   #17
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,207
Default

I grow spinach in the winter here. It has such a short harvest time for me. I really like Giant Nobel and the red spinach from Pinetree seeds. I think the red spinach is a hybrid but the Nobel is and heirloom. Spinach is super easy to save seeds. It seems to like a little higher pH than some things. Chard and lettuce also tolerate higher pH nicely.
I actually prefer chard for most of our greens and it will grow nearly year-round in Arizona. I plant some in the shade for hot months.
I'm experimenting with Amaranth. It's a workhorse in the heat and also does okay in cooler weather. I don't have seeds for any of the varieties popular for greens but the red grain variety I'm growing tastes just like spinach after being cooked.
I'm hoping amaranth can be my green for hot weather.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2014   #18
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,207
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gssgarden View Post
going to have another Spinach Salad tomorrow!!

Between the Arugula, Lettuce, and Spinach, I'm all salad-ed out!! lol

I have one 4 ft row of each in raised beds and it's plenty for 5 of us. Salad every other night at least plus pickings for sandwiches and such.

LOVE the Greens in the Spring!!

Greg
Me,too!
Anybody need a few zucchinis? Mine have gone insane. And, we had more arugula than we could possibly eat before it bolted. Lettuce is almost done but I planted a late batch in some shade and it's still going.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2014   #19
luigiwu
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: ny
Posts: 1,217
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BucksCountyGirl View Post
I second Tyee for the fall. It grew very well for us last year. Nothing like home grown greens!
I think we're in similar zones - when/how do you start your Tyee for fall?
luigiwu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2014   #20
peppero
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: selmer, tn
Posts: 2,944
Default

I am growing Bloomsdale, New zealand and will be starting Malabar when I get seed. I am rediscovering spinach.

jon
peppero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 9, 2014   #21
better boy
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 14
Default row cover ??

What is best to use for row cover --Hay
better boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 9, 2014   #22
BucksCountyGirl
Tomatovillian™
 
BucksCountyGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Holland, PA/Zone 7A
Posts: 692
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by luigiwu View Post
I think we're in similar zones - when/how do you start your Tyee for fall?
I believe I direct seeded my Tyee in September last year. We had quite a long stretch without a killing frost and it performed well.
__________________
- Kelli

Life's a climb...but the view is fantastic
BucksCountyGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 9, 2014   #23
RebelRidin
Tomatovillian™
 
RebelRidin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Maryland's Eastern Shore
Posts: 993
Default

I use light weight spun material (row cover) which I buy from Johnny's Seeds.
__________________

George
_____________________________

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is it’s natural manure."
Thomas Jefferson, 1787
RebelRidin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 8, 2014   #24
camochef
Tomatovillian™
 
camochef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Posts: 707
Default

I grew two large patches of Bloomsdale this spring. It was excellent till it bolted in the warmer weather.
I managed to save a mason jar full of seed from the plants. I planted more in August, (a much larger patch), Then the beginning of this month I planted 25 more rows, all from saved seed. The August planting is just ready for picking. Will be a little while till the latest patch is ready. I love good spinach!
Enjoy!
Camo
camochef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 9, 2014   #25
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,207
Default

I love growing spinach. I use several varieties and succession to extend harvest. Plus chard and kale for variety, sometimes mustard,too.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 10, 2014   #26
bower
Tomatovillian™
 
bower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 6,784
Default

My friend grew an early crop of spinach in the farm greenhouses this year - it was amazing. So tender and sweet, it made me want to grow some.
So I saw a packet of "King of Denmark" in the hardware store this summer for 99 cents. Bought it, thinking you fool! There isn't even a year stamped on it.
Last week of August I finally sowed them, thinking... to be or not to be?
Couldn't believe it, great germination! Hope they get good growth in before Halloween.
bower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 10, 2014   #27
Tracydr
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Laurinburg, North Carolina, zone 7
Posts: 3,207
Default

I always direct sow spinach and lettuce. I find them both easy to grow.
I love home grown spinach but I also love chard. Chard gives me a much longer season so it gets planted more. I once had a chard plant live 2 1/2 years without bolting. It had a root the size of my wrist. It finally died in a record heat wave in August in Phoenix.
Tracydr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29, 2015   #28
JerryHaskins
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 166
Default

I have grown wonderful spinach in years past but lately my raised beds (which do great with everything else) just do not seem to germinate spinach well. I have also tried starting it in peat pots and such. I have also tested the seeds in a zip lock bag with a moist paper towel in the bag.

Lately my spinach seeds just don't germinate well. I get maybe 10% to 20% germination.

I have read all the tips about (a) always use new seeds, (b) refrigerate them first, (c) etc.

I am trying some seeds from seeds from "Seeds from Italy" this fall based upon someone's recommendation.

If anyone has a sure-fire tip on getting spinach to germinate, I'd love to hear it.

I see lots of trays of Bonnie's spinach plants for sale in stores with all 9 little spots filled with pretty little spinach plants; so I know it can still be done.

PS: Love your forum. Thanks for allowing me in.
JerryHaskins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29, 2015   #29
bjbebs
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: illinois
Posts: 280
Default

I plant large blocks of spinach in early spring and late summer. In a well prepared bed scatter seed on the surface. Punch this seed down with an iron rake and tamp in well. Spinach seed does not keep too long for me. I buy fresh seed every year. Two varieties that produce big crops are Space and Melody. If you can dedicate an area for just spinach it can be kept wet to allow for a good stand. If you can get seed in the ground in October you'll be picking in early Dec. My fall spinach will over- winter if we get enough snow to protect it. It comes out of dormancy in March and gives a good crop. It might be tough to grow spinach in Mississippi from May to September. Spinach needs cool temps. or it will bolt. Hope this helps.
bjbebs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29, 2015   #30
Lindalana
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Chicago IL
Posts: 849
Default

if nothing else Seeds from Italy give a lot of seed for your $. Yeah, cold weather is a must. f you concerned, soaking seeds a bit before planting makes it faster germinating but a bit harder to sprinkle. You can mix it then with wet sand.
Lindalana is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:32 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★