Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating all other edible garden plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 18, 2015   #1
barbamWY
Tomatovillian™
 
barbamWY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: North West Wyoming
Posts: 462
Default Okra in zone 4?

I made my first trip across the United States to Monticello and saw okra for the first time. I was surprised how pretty it is. I would like to try it here in northern Wyoming. Do I start it indoors and how soon before my last frost date of May 20th? Which variety should I try? Does one variety have prettier flowers than the others?
Thanks,
Barb
barbamWY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #2
AlittleSalt
BANNED FOR LIFE
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 13,333
Default

In Texas, I plant directly in ground when the soil gets to 70F. I have read that you can start transplants indoors. The shorter DTM varieties like Annie Oakley (50 DTM) or Burgundy (55 DTM) might do better in zone 4. Okra grows best in hot climates. When there are cool nights, okra slows growth - it basically stops growing. If I were growing in zone 4, I would grow okra in a green/hot house of some sort.

Prettier flowers? I've never seen an ugly okra flower.
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #3
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Den of Drunken Fools
Posts: 38,539
Default

The reason okra is so pretty is because it is related to the hibiscus.
If you have your TV turned up too loud and it (okra) hears frost in the forecast it will go ahead and die.
What I would recommend is to soak the seeds until they sprout/germinate.
Put seeds in proper containers and let it grow there protecting it from any freezes or frost.
When all signs of frost or freeze are gone plant it out.
You can plant the dwarf type or top a regular plant at around 2 feet tall, this will cause it to branch and put out more pods.
Cut the pods early so the plant will produce more.

Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #4
salix
Tomatovillian™
 
salix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: north central B.C.
Posts: 2,309
Default

Thanks for the helpful hints, Worth. Will be trying again this year...
__________________
"He who has a library and a garden wants for nothing." -Cicero
salix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #5
barbamWY
Tomatovillian™
 
barbamWY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: North West Wyoming
Posts: 462
Default

Thanks Worth. What do you think of Red Burgundy? It says In Seed Savers that it is 55-60 days and 4 foot plants. Do I start in peat pots? I am thinking to start about when I start tomatoes the first of April. Does that sound about right?
barbamWY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #6
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Den of Drunken Fools
Posts: 38,539
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by barbamWY View Post
Thanks Worth. What do you think of Red Burgundy? It says In Seed Savers that it is 55-60 days and 4 foot plants. Do I start in peat pots? I am thinking to start about when I start tomatoes the first of April. Does that sound about right?
You can start in peat pots if you want.
I would beware of the frost though it kills okra quicker than tomatoes.
The only red I have grown is called hill country red or something like that.
They should make beautiful plants though.
If your weather stays in the 70's it should be just fine.
I know it can get hot where you live depending on what part of the state it is.

Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #7
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 8,407
Default

As others have said, okra hates cold and loves heat. It came from Africa. It will grow and produce in very poor soil. My family has been growing it for thirty years. We have to pick it every day in the late summer to keep the pods from getting too big. But as soon as the fall nights turn cool, it quits producing.

I would think that black plastic mulch over raised ridges/beds would be best in a northern zone, preferably running east/west to get the most sun hitting the plastic.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #8
greenthumbomaha
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Omaha Zone 5
Posts: 2,515
Default

FYI I read to be watchful of a skin rash when handling the plants.

- Lisa
greenthumbomaha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #9
AlittleSalt
BANNED FOR LIFE
 
AlittleSalt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 13,333
Default

I found a few more early DTM varieties:

Burmese 58 DTM
Clemson Spineless 60 DTM
Emerald 58 DTM
Jimmy T 50 DTM

And this one really interesting pretty one:
http://www.rareseeds.com/pink-okra-/

My wife wants me to get the Pink Okra. I'm glad I looked it up because they attract bees and butterflies.

Last edited by AlittleSalt; January 18, 2015 at 09:36 PM.
AlittleSalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #10
Cole_Robbie
Tomatovillian™
 
Cole_Robbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois, zone 6
Posts: 8,407
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
FYI I read to be watchful of a skin rash when handling the plants.

- Lisa
Oh yeah, it makes you itch like crazy, kinda like picking peaches. You need to wear a long-sleeve shirt.

Okra is so itchy that even the deer won't eat it, at least the deer near me. I have heard other people say their plants got eaten, but ours never have. We have a lot of deer. The okra garden is the only one we don't fence in. There are always deer tracks through it, but no deer damage.
Cole_Robbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 18, 2015   #11
joseph
Tomatovillian™
 
joseph's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Cache Valley, N/E of The Great Salt Lake
Posts: 1,244
Default

I grow okra in zone 4. Definitely start the okra indoors. I'd say about the last week of April. Give the seed plenty of heat to germinate. I had to develop my own variety, because okra accustomed to warm climates is not at all happy in my cold garden. The first year I grew okra it only got ankle high. The second year it got knee high. This year it was waist high to taller than the farmer.

Trialing a new variety that failed.


I've noticed huge differences in how different seedlings and cultivars grow. So I plant lots of seeds and cull the slow growing ones. If they grow slow in the greenhouse, then they will continue to grow slowly when transplanted outside.

Cull slow growing plants.


After three years of selecting for better growth in my garden some of the plants are as tall as the farmer.


Enough left over to share at the farmer's market.
joseph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 19, 2015   #12
montanamato
Tomatovillian™
 
montanamato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Montana
Posts: 1,038
Default

Burmese and Emerald grew well for me in central Montana. Treat like basil, very sensitive to cold. I grow milsap white in containers now.
montanamato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 19, 2015   #13
recruiterg
Tomatovillian™
 
recruiterg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Edina, MN (Zone 4)
Posts: 945
Default

I've grown Okra in Minneapolis - Zone 4. It does ok and it is a beautiful plant, but I don't think you get a ton of production.
recruiterg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 19, 2015   #14
barbamWY
Tomatovillian™
 
barbamWY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: North West Wyoming
Posts: 462
Default

Thanks everyone,
I think I am going to try the red one in a container. Montanamato, do you start it inside and when? My climate is probably close to yours.
Barb
barbamWY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old January 19, 2015   #15
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Den of Drunken Fools
Posts: 38,539
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by recruiterg View Post
I've grown Okra in Minneapolis - Zone 4. It does ok and it is a beautiful plant, but I don't think you get a ton of production.
That's why you plant 10 acres of okra.
Worth
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:32 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★