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Old February 13, 2016   #31
barefootgardener
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Quote:
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BTW, Nero Di Toscana is the same as Lacinato & Dinosaur kale. Great photo, barefoot gardener!

kath
Kath, I have also seen it listed as Black Palm! It is a beauty in the garden and tasty! (And thank you! )

Ginny
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Old February 14, 2016   #32
crazyoldgooseman
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Worth,
I was like that (human goat) also. LOL

I would eat turnips like they were apples.

My parents and siblings new back then I was nuts!
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Anybody see where I sat my beer?

-crazyoldgooseman
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Old February 14, 2016   #33
Old chef
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Can someone tell me what the deal is with kale and all the latest hoopla is about it?
I have had this stuff on my plate before in restaurants and it tastes like wet cardboard and is as tough as boot.
I would be happier if they put raw hot curly leaf mustard greens on the plate.

Worth
It is one of the most popular salads on my menu. Sliced thin into ribbons. Served with a pecorino dressing similar to Ceasar. Topped with julliane beets,apples and pistachios.
Give it a shot

Old chef
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Old February 14, 2016   #34
Worth1
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Originally Posted by Old chef View Post
It is one of the most popular salads on my menu. Sliced thin into ribbons. Served with a pecorino dressing similar to Ceasar. Topped with julliane beets,apples and pistachios.
Give it a shot

Old chef
I will thanks.

worth
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Old February 14, 2016   #35
kath
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Kath, I have also seen it listed as Black Palm!
Ginny
I can understand why. As a result of this thread, I may have to try some of the "tender others" this season.

kath
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Old February 14, 2016   #36
SharonRossy
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I feel like Worth does about kale - someone told me you needed to massage it a bit with the dressing - ok, never mind, we won't go there. In the meantime, I was sent a pack of Highland Kale along with some Artisan tomato seeds.
Can anyone give me info on starting kale seeds? is it similar to starting tomato seeds or what? and same kind of light exposure?
Thanks, Sharon
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Old February 14, 2016   #37
Worth1
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Originally Posted by SharonRossy View Post
I feel like Worth does about kale - someone told me you needed to massage it a bit with the dressing - ok, never mind, we won't go there. In the meantime, I was sent a pack of Highland Kale along with some Artisan tomato seeds.
Can anyone give me info on starting kale seeds? is it similar to starting tomato seeds or what? and same kind of light exposure?
Thanks, Sharon
Just like cabbage, radishes and so on.
I planted all of them about 1/4 to 3/8 inch under the soil and they all sprouted.
I didn't use a tape measuer just eyeballed it.

Worth
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Old February 15, 2016   #38
swamper
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Flea beetles will sometimes bother young crucifer sprouts; a light covering with spun polyester row cover fabric provides an effective insect and moisture retention barrier, while also keeping soil from cooling off as much at night.

I like lacinato types best, with winterbor types second best.
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Old February 16, 2016   #39
NarnianGarden
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I have already given up growing any crucifers except as micro-greens. No cover can protect from the various beetles, butterflies or other insects, when they smell the brassicas and want to lay eggs No more hassle for me...
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Old March 4, 2016   #40
BackyardFarm
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I like the Red and White Russian Kales the best. I grow them for baby greens to go into salads. Yum yum!

Dinosaur Kale is good too but I usually cook that.
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Old March 4, 2016   #41
BackyardFarm
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I have already given up growing any crucifers except as micro-greens. No cover can protect from the various beetles, butterflies or other insects, when they smell the brassicas and want to lay eggs No more hassle for me...
NarnianGarden have you tried insect netting from day one? That can help especially with the white butterflies.
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Old March 5, 2016   #42
NarnianGarden
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Yes I have.
No foolproof method either.
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Old March 7, 2016   #43
NewWestGardener
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Kale is rich with lutein, supposed to be good for your eyes.

Unfortunately, kale can be a gas generater for some of my family members, do you guys have clever ways to reduce that effect? Vinegar?
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Old March 8, 2016   #44
Tormato
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There are two types of kale.

Brassica napus (Ruso-Siberian)
Brassica oleracea (European)

The napus is generally better raw, for flavor and tenderness.
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Old March 8, 2016   #45
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I'm growing scarlet kale right now, but it's March in Florida so I'm not sure how well it handle the heat compared to lacinato kale which tends to do well with the heat.
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