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Old February 12, 2007   #46
GrowSeeds
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Came across this ACES Pub while gogleing on how to grow okra.

Rejuvenating Okra: Producing
a Spring Crop and a Bigger Fall
Crop from the Same Planting

ACES Publication

link
http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-1112/ANR-1112.pdf
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Old February 12, 2007   #47
Worth1
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I’ll buy that I just can’t stand to cut down a tall okra tree.
You can actually cut the plant at about 4 feet tall and get it to branch out.
As for the seed I have lost I had a plant that spontaneously branched right off the get go and I wanted to plant seeds from it, as I had kept the seeds.
This plant was a real bush it just continued to branch.

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Old February 12, 2007   #48
Fusion_power
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Chicken manure is generally too much nitrogen for okra though you could use some as a sidedressing after the plants are about 8 inches tall. Good alternatives if you can't get rabbit are goat manure, composted cow manure or composted horse manure. Be aware that cow manure can contain large amounts of salt which is fed to the cattle to keep them eating in the summer.

That link for rejuvenating okra is something I've never seen. I hate to think of doing that to my cowhorn though. It already produces over 100 pods per stalk. I don't think I could gather more than that. I usually grow 2 rows of okra 120 feet long across my garden. I pick 5 to 6 gallons of okra every other day.

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Old February 12, 2007   #49
angelique
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusion_power
I usually grow 2 rows of okra 120 feet long across my garden. I pick 5 to 6 gallons of okra every other day.

Fusion
Dang. I wish that I had that much space. I guess that it is time to move out of CA.
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Old February 12, 2007   #50
Worth1
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"Dang. I wish that I had that much space. I guess that it is type to move out of CA."

Once you move out you can't come back, you cant afford it.

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Old February 12, 2007   #51
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Hey Worth that sounds like a heck of bush with great yeilds. I was talking to a farmer here who said he grows a bush type plant gets about 5 to 6 feet tall and loads itself with okra He's gets to itchy picking it so he doesn't grow many plants LOL I think he said he has someone else pick it for him - didn't know orka grow in bushes.

Fusion
Thanks I can get the horse manure here. LOL I don't think I would cut yours back if you did it might give a new meaning to the Jack and the Beanstalk tale
BTW have you grown Alabama Red Okra? Some of the old timers remember it but doesn't seem to be grown in Alabama any more.
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Old February 13, 2007   #52
angelique
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1
Once you move out you can't come back, you cant afford it.

Worth
You are so right. DH and I can't even upgrade houses in CA without our property tax at least tripling.
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Old February 13, 2007   #53
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Angelique

I know DH and your self wont, but you are welcome to come to Texas.
You could get 5 times the value on your place here.

I have 12.5 acres of land for sell, buy all or part. :wink:
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Old February 13, 2007   #54
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I have seed of Alabama Red okra to grow this year and will make seed available to Sandhill if it does well. Believe it or not, I actually got these seed from a grower in Alabama!


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Old February 13, 2007   #55
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I'm trying Alabama Red this year too. Looking forward to it.
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Old February 13, 2007   #56
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okra is great in soups, scothch broth comes to mind, some sliced okra, some barley, carrots, beef, onion, good stuff and not slimy at all.

Nattou is an acquired taste. My dad and mom loved the stuff. Me, not so much. Tororo, gack, I remember that grinding it up was my job. Then the mixing with raw egg...not a happy boy
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Old February 13, 2007   #57
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I LOVE OKRA!

I was raised on it in Mississippi. It was served only 2 ways in our house; battered in cornmeal and fried, or boiled with black-eyed peas! Slick, slimy boiled okra is fine, and the source of many dog fights in the south, just ask Jerry Clower.

I grew Clemson Spineless in Alabama, which grew about 10 feet tall. Tooks some seeds with me to Wisconsin and it grew about 2 feet tall.

I have started it indoors and transplanted it with good results. And, I usually plant it very close together... say, 4 inches or less, and get good production. Okra is very adaptable.

I still love it boiled, but most especially with diced tomatoes.... YUM YUM! (Gosh, wish summer would hurry back!)

Edit: Can't believe I forgot to mention my children's favorite way to eat okra - PICKLED! Great on salads or as a snack!
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Old February 14, 2007   #58
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Wow! Just four inches apart, huh? I'd never would have guessed it could grow that close together.
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Old February 14, 2007   #59
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Quote:
Hmmm, what about the Velvets
CdnTomato,
I will be trying Star of David this year on the recommendation of a friend down south. Yes, yet another variety just to add to the confusion.
But I also have a very small amount of White Velvet that was sent to me (only about 6 or 7 seeds). And since I am only a few minutes up the road from you, I will keep you in mind, should the Velvet do well here.
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Old February 23, 2007   #60
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Star of David is a good one, just don't let them get too long before you pick 'em (same goes for most varieties...)

I love reading this thread Okra is one of my favorite veggies to grow (and eat.) I really get a kick out of people freaking out over the slime factor. That's the best part!

This year I'm growing Burgundy, Bowling Red, and Fife Creek. I like trying new ones every year, but I have to say S of D is one of my all-time favorites. It has a somewhat stronger flavor, and my plants grew over ten feet high. That's when I learned to prune them. :wink:
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