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Old August 21, 2017   #1
charline
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Default Your biggest deception this year

What variety did you exspect a lot of and then you didnt like it?

I start with Janets Jacinthe Jewel.
I like most of Brads tomatoes but this one is nothing to brag about in my garden. Big and beautiful but no taste.

Same with Banded Amazon....
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Old August 21, 2017   #2
Labradors2
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Kazachka (mini beefsteak cherry) . I thought it was supposed to be a purple cherry, but I got a brown saladette with green stripes!

Linda
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Old August 21, 2017   #3
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Kazachka (mini beefsteak cherry) . I thought it was supposed to be a purple cherry, but I got a brown saladette with green stripes!

Linda
Linda,what was your seed source for Kazachka, seeds to me from Andrey in Belarus. It can show up in many different forms but none of them is a brown saladette.

Actually it flips back and forth between a cherry form and a mini form,etc.

When I told Andrey what it was doing he said he was getting the same results.

I know the following link might help.

http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...light=kazachka

Carolyn
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Old August 21, 2017   #4
Labradors2
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Thanks Carolyn, I had read the link and learned that it didn't matter whether one planted the "cherry" or the "mini-beefsteak" as they flip flopped, but tasted good. My seeds came from Sandhill, via a friend. The ones that she grew (cherry version) turned out to be red plums

BTW I shared seeds in the winter with somebody here. I wonder how they turned out?

Linda
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Old August 21, 2017   #5
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Thanks Carolyn, I had read the link and learned that it didn't matter whether one planted the "cherry" or the "mini-beefsteak" as they flip flopped, but tasted good. My seeds came from Sandhill, via a friend. The ones that she grew (cherry version) turned out to be red plums

BTW I shared seeds in the winter with somebody here. I wonder how they turned out?

Linda
If your seeds came from Sandhill via a friend, you probably didn't read the descriptions for two Kazachkas Glenn lists in his 2017 catalog , and in earlier catalogs as well, and also online at his website. i'll just have to copy what he wrote.

Kazachka Cherry, I use abbreviations so, mid season,indet, RL,pink colored to reddish bronze colored

Kazachka Cherry Purple,, mid season, indet, RL, a unique shade of purple/pink. Fruits are PLUM shaped but variable.

Given the not everyone sees colors the same way since it depends on the ratio and distribution of cones and rods in the retina,,and that colors can be influenced by weather in any growing season, I'm going to suggest that it's Kazachka Cherry Purple that your friend got since it's the one that has PLUM shapes that can be VARIABLE.

Carolyn
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Old August 21, 2017   #6
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So far, for me it would have to be Gregori's Altai.

Based on reports I'd read here and elsewhere, I was expecting an early-ish, very tasty, good sized pink beefsteak. The plant piled on a bunch of very early fruit that quickly grew to full size, but then just hung there for about six weeks without even a hint of blushing. When they finally did start showing color, they went to a very pale pink stage, and then stayed there for another couple of weeks.

The first three that finally went to a deeper pink were almost sour/rotten tasting. When I tried one at the pale pink state, it was flavorless.

There are a couple more that are now going to deep pink, so I'll see if it has any redeeming qualities.
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Old September 5, 2017   #7
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So far, for me it would have to be Gregori's Altai.

Based on reports I'd read here and elsewhere, I was expecting an early-ish, very tasty, good sized pink beefsteak. The plant piled on a bunch of very early fruit that quickly grew to full size, but then just hung there for about six weeks without even a hint of blushing. When they finally did start showing color, they went to a very pale pink stage, and then stayed there for another couple of weeks.

The first three that finally went to a deeper pink were almost sour/rotten tasting. When I tried one at the pale pink state, it was flavorless.

There are a couple more that are now going to deep pink, so I'll see if it has any redeeming qualities.
Fathers Daughter,
I wouldn't give up just yet. I'm on the MA/RI border. This particular season all of my tomatoes ripened exactly as you described. I know that several local farms and gardeners had the same problem with ripening. I've grown GA for a few seasons now and they really have been great in the past.
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Old October 1, 2017   #8
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Fathers Daughter,
I wouldn't give up just yet. I'm on the MA/RI border. This particular season all of my tomatoes ripened exactly as you described. I know that several local farms and gardeners had the same problem with ripening. I've grown GA for a few seasons now and they really have been great in the past.
Pretty common NEast experience. Like every year I do take note
of what did well despite the troubles. I've always given most
highly recommended varieties a second try, often three tries.
I'm even in the habit of notating the seed source. Planting side
by side with saved vs purchased.

And do try and not let a crap year have too much effect on next
years choices. Hard to shake it though. A few new-to-me favorites
that did well will get prime spots.

My one total spitter was like trying to swallow a cotton ball and
not the cosmetic variety...more like the poly-fill found in most
plush dog toys, (like the piles all over my liv rm floor right now)
from one tiny toy they expand.
Lots of early fruit, then the plant died, no clear explanation why.

I suppose if the tomato is next years super food, like kale and
broccoli sprouts, I've got the seed for those that don't like
tomatoes. A good smoothy filler, lol.

I'll plant again being such an odd year. Maybe just a rogue plant
as well as environmental.
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Old October 1, 2017   #9
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Pretty much everything did poorly this year, so I'm loathe to blame it on the varieties; and more so on the terrible weather we've had.

Even my super-early Latah fruited late and grew badly. However, if anyone knows of any robust varieties (which I can obtain in the UK) that you could recommend for a cold, wet area with a very short growing season, I'd be grateful.
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Old October 1, 2017   #10
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Pretty much everything did poorly this year, so I'm loathe to blame it on the varieties; and more so on the terrible weather we've had.

Even my super-early Latah fruited late and grew badly. However, if anyone knows of any robust varieties (which I can obtain in the UK) that you could recommend for a cold, wet area with a very short growing season, I'd be grateful.
You might try experimenting with Dwarfs and micros. Not
recommending you scrap your entire usual growing system as is.
(next year just may have better weather and a bit longer season)

Micros can be started way early and sit for some time in red cup
size pots. I use a nursery square 4" but they are tall and hold
about 1/3rd more medium/volume so same space being 'tall'.
Dwarfs also can be given a head start for the same reason.
Growing in 1 and 2 gallon containers can go out sooner in the
early Spring warm weather, then easily brought inside if a late
frost occurs.

My micro multi-floras were producing a ton of fruit when my
indeterminate plants were still waiting to go into the ground.

I had my first light frost the morning of Sept 3rd, a month ago.
35 this morning. Last Spring a late frost. Most of my tomatoes
had to wait until late June it was so cold and wet.

I'd try a few containers next year and see how it goes.
Marsha, oh-so-generous-enabler, has a seed offer probably in
Jan and has a few released DwarfProject toms in her offer.
Many available now in catalogs.
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Old August 21, 2017   #11
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Thanks for sharing that info Carolyn. There's a third Kazachka available at Sandhill, the mini-beefsteak variety! I must go and read what they say. I did check them out at the site in the winter but it must have escaped me that they are so different in colour! I went by Tania's description and expected a purple cherry, either beefsteak shape or round.

I saw a picture of the one my friend grew and it does fit the description of a purple/pink plum!

Linda
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Old August 21, 2017   #12
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Ha! I found it under RED tomatoes!

Kazachka Mini Beef:★ Mid-season, Determinate, Regular Leaf, thick foliage, medium sized, salad tomato.

Linda
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Old August 21, 2017   #13
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Cosmonault Volkov - Taste was mediocre, most tomatoes were fairly small. Productive plants, but not much better than hybrid varieties.

Indian Stripe has been highly touted on this site, but I found the flavor not be that great. Would definitely grow Cherokee Purple and Black Krim over the Indian Stripe.
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Old August 22, 2017   #14
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Cosmonault Volkov - Taste was mediocre, most tomatoes were fairly small. Productive plants, but not much better than hybrid varieties.

Indian Stripe has been highly touted on this site, but I found the flavor not be that great. Would definitely grow Cherokee Purple and Black Krim over the Indian Stripe.
All of my black varieties were rather bland when it was raining so much for most of this season. Now that it is hot and much drier the flavor is really coming alive. I much prefer Indian Stripe of either leaf type to CP or BK most of the time. BK busts too easy and CP is just too darn unpredictable in production. Love BK as long as it doesn't rain much and it is very hot and CP is wonderful when it produces. This year Gary O' Sena has been wonderful but in so many years past it was rather bland. I like to give a good variety several years of production and tasting before giving up on them for one or more reasons; but typically it is taste that finally gets them the axe or replanting again and again.

Bill
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Old August 22, 2017   #15
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All of my black varieties were rather bland when it was raining so much for most of this season. Now that it is hot and much drier the flavor is really coming alive. I much prefer Indian Stripe of either leaf type to CP or BK most of the time. BK busts too easy and CP is just too darn unpredictable in production. Love BK as long as it doesn't rain much and it is very hot and CP is wonderful when it produces. This year Gary O' Sena has been wonderful but in so many years past it was rather bland. I like to give a good variety several years of production and tasting before giving up on them for one or more reasons; but typically it is taste that finally gets them the axe or replanting again and again.

Bill
I will plant ISPL again next year in a different location in my fairly large garden to see if it lives up to the hype, but I am involved with numerous farmers markets and have numerous tastings at each and it never is more popular than Cherokee Purple, Black Krim and doesn't even come close to Mr. Stripey, Mortgage Lifter, Brandywine or Kellogg's Breakfast. Folks like it large and full flavored!
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