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Old February 28, 2018   #1
Black Krim
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Default Hilling Potatoes--how high?

Having read a few potato descriptions these last few months, I noticed mention of varieties that need a LOT of hilling up and others that dont't.

How do I know which is which?

Always looking to save time and efffort.

THank you.
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Old February 28, 2018   #2
kath
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Sometimes looking at descriptions given for different varieties online will tell you which ones tend to form "a little nest" around the seed piece, etc. Yukon Gold may be the best of the varieties I've grown to fit that description. Over the years, I've tended to eliminate the varieties that grow close to the surface of my hills because they result in green, unusable spuds and because I only have just so much usable soil for hilling within the confines of my potato patch; unfortunately, I don't have written records of which ones were eliminated because of this problem. The ones I still grow every year are Red Norland and Kennebec because of their taste, relative scab and disease resistance, versatility and production in my conditions. Last year began my trials of blue-fleshed varieties- no clear winner yet.
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Old February 28, 2018   #3
Black Krim
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Being from Maine the Kennebec is of interest. Re the Red Norland, I read several positive reviews making it one of the best. Like the 5 most planted variety commercially. ( NOt sure that translate in to a great variety for home use .)

I will keep these 2 on a list of likely to work.


And I like the blues too. Last year just bought spuds from the store, stored all winter , then planted. They broke dormancy rather quickly. To slow them down I packed them more carefully in shavings and sealed the paper box to eliminate all sunlight. Basement is cold 45-50 but it starts to warm with the better weather---I suspect they are more knowlegeable than I and keep to their personal schedule.

Would like to know about:

All blue
Adirondack blue
Adironcack red
peruvian purple
molly magic
french fingerling
papa cacho
red thumb
bora valley
mtn rose
purple magesty
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Old February 28, 2018   #4
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Yup, just opened the box. 1-2 inch sprouts! lol
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Old February 28, 2018   #5
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My fingerling potato order from MPL should be arriving soon, magic molly is one of them. My Russian banana, La Ratte and Rose Finn that I saved from last year have 2-3” sprouts on them,
Might have to plant a few early.
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Old February 28, 2018   #6
Black Krim
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Dang you!!! LOL Molly magic is sold out!!! lol

Yes, I looked at the potato bed and will have to use it again this year as no time to make another one as it looks like an early spring. Trying to figure out how fast the seed potatos can be warmed up as the eyes are already too long and delicate.

What else did you order from MPL?
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Old February 28, 2018   #7
kath
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So far the ones I've grown on your list are: Adirondack Blue, Adirondack Red, All Blue, Purple Majesty and French Fingerling. The first blue that I tried was All Blue, and Agway also sold All Red, which is another keeper that I forgot to mention. I'm hoping that Agway carries it again this year, because it makes large, smooth, scab-free, very good tasting spuds. They didn't carry All Blue again, so I guess that wasn't a hit with their customers.

All Red doesn't keep much longer than Red Norland, though, so we just eat these varieties first. Kennebecs and the blues I've grown store really well. My blues got mixed up when I had "help" harvesting last season, so that I can't really comment on their differences, which is why I'm hoping to grow them all again and try harder to keep them separate for comparison.

French Fingerling was probably my favorite fingerling, but the seed potatoes are much more expensive than the regular potatoes and to me, they're not worth the extra $ - harder to clean, more prep time, more little "unusable" pieces, etc.

Last edited by kath; February 28, 2018 at 10:44 PM.
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Old February 28, 2018   #8
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I buy my Yukon gold, Norland, Kennabec etc, locally from Rural King for less than 50 cents a pound. No one has fingerlings here for sale, to eat or grow. 1 pound of fingerlings produce a lot of potatoes in a good year.
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Old February 28, 2018   #9
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I had noticed the procing on the fingerlings were VERY high, but had also seen that fewer pounds were needed to fill the same length row...

My local source of seed carries maybe 10 varieties, but no all reds and no all blues. Did not sell well. ANd when I asked if they could get a 50# bag in and I would buy 25#, the decision after a number of phone calls, was not possible.

Im on my own to buy blues online, likely from MPL as prices and shipping are reasonable.
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Old March 1, 2018   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Krim View Post
I had noticed the procing on the fingerlings were VERY high, but had also seen that fewer pounds were needed to fill the same length row...

My local source of seed carries maybe 10 varieties, but no all reds and no all blues. Did not sell well. ANd when I asked if they could get a 50# bag in and I would buy 25#, the decision after a number of phone calls, was not possible.

Im on my own to buy blues online, likely from MPL as prices and shipping are reasonable.
Try Gran Teton Organics, good place to order potatoes also. It may be a little late to order rarer varieties.
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Old March 1, 2018   #11
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Nice selection of tubers at Gran Teton ORganics !!!!!
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Old March 1, 2018   #12
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They sell a 5# fingerling mix for $22.50 includes shipping. That's as cheap as you're going to find certified fingerlings, it's a nice mix also. On a good year 1# of fingerling seed potatoes can make up to 10# at harvest.
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Old March 1, 2018   #13
Black Krim
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A nice mix too.

The price for 50# is about 25$ more than I would pay for taters from MPL as I am close by.

HOWEVER, I see varieties that I am OVEREAGER to try, especially as I dont eat potatos anymore, BUT my kids devour them, and the dogs too! Baked of course. grin.
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Old March 6, 2018   #14
Greatgardens
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Krim View Post
Having read a few potato descriptions these last few months, I noticed mention of varieties that need a LOT of hilling up and others that dont't.

How do I know which is which?

Always looking to save time and efffort.

THank you.
I gave up growing potatoes because it seemed to magnify my tomato foliage diseases. Never had any disease issues with the potatoes. Hope that is is not the case for you, but you might keep a lookout for increases. I grew them both enough years here (Midwest) to believe there was a relationship, but other areas and greater distances between the plants may make a big difference in the results.

I'd be curious what other tomato/potato growers have seen.

-GG
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Old March 6, 2018   #15
Black Krim
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I think you are right.

And this makes me a bit nervous to persue potatoes.

As I research the fruits and veg that might benefit my family, I see diseases that cross over. THis is frustrating. How to keep a variety of foodstuffs for our use.

Not knowing the old ways to keep plants clean ( no disease) ---I expect old varieties could /should be more disease tolerant, BUT we know that is not true of tomatoes, so not likely true of other fruits/veg.

makes me ask questions. Perhaps a local variety thrived because it could handle the local disease pressure, UNTIL a new disease arrived via a traveler, human or animal ie birds.

Late blight has moved into the area the last few years. The davenport collection of old variety apple trees was badly damaged--no scions offered this year, again. Maybe never again. It was a historical orchard kept for the rare New England varieties that commercial growers of today dont use.

Picked up potatoes from a friend. There are lots of black tar like scabs on them all. Ikept a few to green up and sprout BUT with a little more thought, tossed into microwave. Wondering if black scab looks like these potatos. Not worth the risk.

Soooo. Thank you for the reminder.
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