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Old January 15, 2016   #46
bower
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There's something about the Black Spanish, you're not supposed to plant them in spring,, maybe that was the problem. I grew them one year... hotttt!!!!! As good as horseradish. Overwintered for pods in spring too.
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Old January 16, 2016   #47
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There's something about the Black Spanish, you're not supposed to plant them in spring,, maybe that was the problem. I grew them one year... hotttt!!!!! As good as horseradish. Overwintered for pods in spring too.
Bower I was just looking at the radish info in one of my catalogs... can you believe there isn't one remark about using them cooked?... and there was one variety that made the same remark... It is because they bolt if planted in the Spring.

Now on to the next page of the Daikon radishes... they do have a header listing them for more than salads. I have never noticed that anywhere else. ( I picked up a catalog at a trade show last week from Johnny's)
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Old January 16, 2016   #48
bower
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I had a quick google this morning for 'mildest' radish, and found nothing helpful at all. Some are saying the daikons are mild, which I thought would be great, but then the same seed sellers or reviewers are describing varieties that were hot for me, as mild. White Hailstone for example. If there's truly an always-mild radish out there, it may be hard to find.
I don't think I've ever eaten Daikon though. It always looked like a daunting amount of radish, to me.
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Old January 16, 2016   #49
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One thing people seemed to agree... the longer you leave em in the ground, the hotter they get.
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Old January 16, 2016   #50
reddeheddefarm
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interesting quirk about the black Spanish, most of the heat is in the skin
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Old January 16, 2016   #51
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Sulfur in the soil and the growth rate of the radish plays a huge roll in how hot they can get.
Radish like the onion also needs room to grow like an onion or carrot.
This year I am growing for quality not quantity.
While I am here I might as well tell my story about my radish farm.
I must have been in the third grade and I was a wee little thing.
I wanted radishes or something I just had to have my little spot in the garden.
This was in MO and we had two huge gardens there.
My dad had a big ole 8 Hp tiller and I was reading how to plant radish seeds in the house.
My mom had went down the road to see someone and told me to behave myself and not burn the house down as this was the was it was back then.
Okay she is gone dad is out on the place somewhere now is my chance.
I get my seeds and head to the garden.
I choke the tiller and pull on the cord.
The tiller falls over and darn near kills me because I am too little to pull up not out.
I go find a bucket and stand on it.
It is cold outside and when I pull on the cord again the handle pops through my knuckles and it hurts like the devil.
Okay one more time and the monster tiller starts.
It is cold and raining but by darn I am going to plant them radishes before mom gets home.
She had told me it was too early to plant radishes and I wanted radishes.
I move the bucket out of the way and get behind the tiller.
The handles are so tall I have to reach way high in the air to run the tiller.
Off we go down the garden and I get about 100 feeet and the tiller bogs down in the mud and I am cold and covered in mud.
The tiller isn't where it is supposed to be either.
I'm caught.
I get my seeds and a hoe and I plant them.
I put up my little sticks and we are done.
My mom comes driving up and asked what on earth I am doing.
Planting radishes.
It is too early to plant radishes.
Well you dont know till you try.
Your father is going to want to know why the tiller is stuck out in the middle of the garden in the mud.
He cam in and asked what the tiller was doing stuck out in the muddy garden and we told him.
He said it is too wet to till go put a wash tub over it so it doesn't get wet and go take a bath.
Well as time went on the seeds came up and we had the best radish crop ever.
I remember my folks calling them Lee's radishes and everyone in the area we knew got to eat some.
I can still sees that big tiller flopped over in the mud at the end of that radish row to this day.
We planted radishes a lot sooner from then on too.
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Old January 16, 2016   #52
reddeheddefarm
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great story
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Old January 16, 2016   #53
spacetogrow
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I've eaten radishes in all the ways mentioned but still a hot radish isn't something I would seek out to eat bunches of. I find them okay only when mixed with a lot of something else. Even cooked they are not much more agreeable. Pickled and used as a condiment is more my speed. I agree the young pods are better but on some varieties the pods are as hot as the radish. The closer a radish is to a turnip in flavour the better I like it. I mean, mild really mild turnips. I think the mildest radish I've eaten is a purple skinned one called Purple Plum.
bower, did you get a chance to see if the Purple Plum have decent sized pods? Are there any other varieties you have found with larger, mild-flavored pods?

It's interesting to hear about White Hailstone. That was the only one I'd heard of (besides daikon) that is supposed to be mild; maybe it depends on the growing conditions. Did you get a chance to see what the White Hailstone pods are like?

I've eaten a lot of daikon. When I first saw it at the grocery store, I didn't know it was a radish; I just like to try new things to see if I like them. Only by the 5th one did I get one that even gave me a hint that it was a radish; almost all of them at the store are so mild you can't even tell. Even the spicier ones seem to only have the heat in the outer skin.

I've grown daikon a couple of times. The first time, they got pretty hot, but I had them quite crowded together. Last year, they were good and mild.

It seems that most of the daikons are meant to be planted in mid-summer for harvest in fall or early winter. If you want pods from those, you have to overwinter the roots somehow, and re-plant them in the spring. I don't have a good place to overwinter them, so I haven't tried it.

Some of mine last year didn't get harvested until mid-November (grant you, it was a very mild autumn for Minnesota).

If anyone has experience with a daikon that is meant for spring planting, and bolts in its first season, please share that. TIA
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Old January 17, 2016   #54
bower
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spacetogrow, the pods on Purple Plum were not especially large for me but pretty fat with maybe 2-6 fat seeds. I don't remember White Hailstone pods, I think I had a half dozen different radishes growing that year.
But it may be worth trying them if others found them mild... just water a lot and harvest as young as you can.
Thanks for the tips on daikon! I will have to try it.
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Old January 18, 2016   #55
swamper
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fermented as in kimchi, the daikon types are best

my favorite is alpine f1 from johnnys, a smaller daikon, a single radish is not too much for my dinner salad.
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Old January 18, 2016   #56
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space to grow

don't have experience with this daikon, but recommended for both spring and fall (at least here on the coast)

https://www.westcoastseeds.com/shop/...-radish-seeds/
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Old January 18, 2016   #57
swamper
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i plant daikons in july where the garlic was harvested. I haven't had as much success in spring. lately i've been slicing thin and adding a carrot, ginger, sesame oil, rice vinegar, soy sauce dressing. The remainders will be fermented.
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Old April 27, 2016   #58
Tracydr
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There are three bugs that love when radishes go to seed. Stink and Harlequin Bugs and especially Squash Bugs. In the spring 2014 garden, we let several types of radishes go to seed. Once they start getting woody, there's a strong scent released. It's like a dinner bell going off for stink, harlequin, and squash bugs. They were so bad that I pulled the plants, put them directly into a large trash can, and hauled them to a burning pile.

I'm pretty sure that where I went wrong was by not keeping the pods picked soon enough. Stink, Harlequin, and Squash bugs will do in a crop - in a short time.
I'm glad you mentioned this. Was looking for a quick growing crop to trap stink bugs on and beat the tomatoes.
I love radish pods. Also love radishes grilled with Mexican food. And,homemade kimchi or any fermented radishes are delicious.
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Old April 27, 2016   #59
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They do the salad thing well. I got my taste for them from my mother, she felt a good tossed salad required them.
I can eat gobs of fresh salted radishes just as treats. Like popcorn!
The greens are wonderful cooked.
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Old April 28, 2016   #60
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No one has mentioned being artistic. I've seen Beauty Heart ones (also called watermelon, I think) beautifully carved in Japan, I think (over 50 years ago).
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