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Old December 21, 2017   #1
Greatgardens
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Default "Best" fungicide for Septoria?

I've made an early resolution (for probably the 20th time) that next season, I'm going to do a more consistent job of spraying my plants. I'm ordering a new 2-gallon SOLO sprayer + I'll experiment on a very limited basis with a recycled battery-powered Roundup sprayer. The plan for the empty Roundup sprayer is to at least triple rise + use salt water to oxidize any last molecules of the herbicide. (Any thoughts on that?) Wouldn't I love to have one of those big rigs that orchards use to basically "fog" the plants and cover every square mm of the leaves and stems! But obviously, that's impractical, and I certainly don't need another big piece of equipment sitting around.

That's the equipment part, but then comes the fungicide question. I have experience with both Daconil and Copper, and neither seems all that great. Any other thoughts on a good preventative/"cure" -- especially for Septoria? It's about the only real curse around here in central Indiana.

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Old December 21, 2017   #2
WhippoorwillG
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By no means a cure, I use a rotation of Actinovate and Liquid Copper fungicide(usually Southern Ag), as per recommendation from Johnny's for some control over our usual suspects.

The Actinovate is also great early season before pressures mount. We dip entire flats of transplants into a combination of Surround (mostly Kaolin Clay) and Actinovate before they are planted into the field. This has made a huge difference for us since we started this practice.

Every year is different, but we always have to deal with early blight and septoria. The alternation of bio and chem seems to do as well as anything I have tried other than a shadehouse, which greatly reduced foliar issues.

Best of luck and learning!
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Old December 21, 2017   #3
Longlake
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Actinovate helps, as does Daconil and Copper Fungicide. But, for us, the only way we've kept it totally in check is a combo of Mancozeb+Copper. Depends on your level of comfort with the various chemical solutions.
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Old December 21, 2017   #4
carolyn137
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Over the years I've tried almost everything that those above have suggested.

But where I am in NYState foliage infections are almost entirely fungal so what has worked best for me is Daconil,not the premixed stuff, the concentrate you dilute, and do NOT put anything else in the sprayer other than the Daconil for reasons I've posted about here before.

Info from both Ortho and Bonide who both make the correct Daconil .

And yes,I have a two gallon Solo sprayer which has lasted a long time, just be sure to wash it out each time it's used and flush out the sprayer lines with water.

Carolyn
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Old December 22, 2017   #5
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I've tried most alternatives. The best for me, by far, is Priaxor. It is made by BASF and contains two modes of action, which helps resistance issues. This fungicide has some systemic activity and can reverse low level existing infection, as well as prevent new disease activity. For home gardeners it may be hard to find. It is expensive, but a little goes a long way.
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Old December 22, 2017   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frogsleap farm View Post
I've tried most alternatives. The best for me, by far, is Priaxor. It is made by BASF and contains two modes of action, which helps resistance issues. This fungicide has some systemic activity and can reverse low level existing infection, as well as prevent new disease activity. For home gardeners it may be hard to find. It is expensive, but a little goes a long way.
We have a Tville member here who is a Sr group Leader at BASF,I can try and contact him about this although he hasn't posted at Tville in about a year or so.

Carolyn
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Old December 24, 2017   #7
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I'm also in mid IN. The cool nights and all the rain, plants got the usual, all the above. The 1st of July I got 2 Bonnie Celebrity plants from Lowes. Went to frost with no wilt and very little yellow/brown spotted leaves. rockman
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Old December 25, 2017   #8
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Hi, neighbor! I've also found Celebrity to be a very dependable variety over the years, especially if I half-way keep it lightly pruned.
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Old December 26, 2017   #9
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Pristine works very well for me. It's also excellent for grapes, fruit trees, strawberries and garlic. I use the one labeled for turf grass, under the name "Pageant". You can get a smaller bottle of it for about $100. Which might well still be a lifetime supply... It does all the fungal diseases on tomatoes. FYI its not labeled for tomatoes though, so use or don't use at your discretion...

Last edited by k3vin; December 26, 2017 at 03:53 PM.
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Old December 27, 2017   #10
greenthumbomaha
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Just curious if you have any BYF( Nebraska NET Backyard Farmer tv show) references for this. k3vin. Is the the turfgrass version over Pristine an availability issue? Do you need an applicators license to purchase?

Since I'm in my upper 50's a lifetime supply is still overkill!

- Lisa
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Old December 28, 2017   #11
k3vin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Just curious if you have any BYF( Nebraska NET Backyard Farmer tv show) references for this. k3vin. Is the the turfgrass version over Pristine an availability issue? Do you need an applicators license to purchase?

Since I'm in my upper 50's a lifetime supply is still overkill!

- Lisa
Pristine and pageant are identical products with different labels. I bought pageant because it is available in a smaller (cheaper) bottle. No BYF references as far as I know, you just have to do some googling. I start spraying as seedlings and continue every 10 days or so. No applicator licence needed to purchase. I got mine on ebay.

Last edited by k3vin; December 28, 2017 at 10:43 AM.
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Old December 29, 2017   #12
taboule
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New to this subject and trying to learn and be better prepared this year. My whole area saw much disease and my work commute drove me past a few farms with devastated tomato plants.

From my readings, it would seem that systemic fungicides could be more effective that the alternative, because they get better absorbed by the plant. However, some/most of the mentioned names (daconil, mancozeb, copper) are not systemic. Any experience or informed opinions on this characteristic, plus or con?
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Old January 13, 2018   #13
rick9748
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I think we have same problems.Lacation, Lexington, SC, just outside Columbia.July & August 95+s max. humidity.Have been doing 10 day rotation of copper then Daconil. Always a loosing battle.Love my heirlooms but extremely difficult to keep healthy or alive past July.
Have never used Actinovate or Surround. Would you suggest a better use of chemicals mentioned??
Any advice appreciated.
Thanks
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Old January 13, 2018   #14
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Here in nc i have used almost everything in the past andthe only thing effective for me has been daconil. Last season i sprayed with daconil alternating with copper every 7 to 10 days and had great looking tomatoes all the way into frost. Tried using actinovate for two seasons and it was useless and a waste of time and money for me. Actinovate is extremely expensive too.
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Old January 13, 2018   #15
dan1res
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If you have problems with septoria lycopersicum you need to be very carefull with the debris of diseased plants from the year past.Is not a fungi that resist without debris.Can also overwinter on solanaceous weeds like Datura Stramonium,Sonalnum Nigrum.etc.so you need to eliminate initial source of inoculum if you want to succeed.Also if you have thepossibility of crop rotation,that will be also ok.
Now ,for fungicide you have some options-you can use the classic 7 -10 day schedule with mancozeb ,benomyl,daconil , chlorothalonil etc and these are contact fungicides and also you need to correlate them with the weather and the disease cycles,mancozeb have the best action for the early blight and septoria,but not so good with Phytophtora Infestans,there chlorothalonil is much better,but mancozeb dont resist very well if is raining heavily,clorothalonil will do much better then etc.You need also to use systemic fungicid if the disease presure is high,i see above some good exemple of systemic fungicide in the strobilurine class but is very important to change frecvently the mode of action of the fungicide.A short exemple-if you use let's say Pristine who has the active ingredient pyraclostrobin(a strobilurin class)the next systemic spray will need to be done with a different mode of action class of fungicide like let's say mefenoxam-Ridomil Gold.Sorry for my english ,i am from Romania and i am pretty sure that i made some mistake.
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